SciCombinator

Discover the most talked about and latest scientific content & concepts.

 

0

The exciton relaxation dynamics of photoexcited electronic states in poly(p-phenylenevinylene) are theoretically investigated within a coarse-grained model, in which both the exciton and nuclear degrees of freedom are treated quantum mechanically. The Frenkel-Holstein Hamiltonian is used to describe the strong exciton-phonon coupling present in the system, while external damping of the internal nuclear degrees of freedom is accounted for by a Lindblad master equation. Numerically, the dynamics are computed using the time evolving block decimation and quantum jump trajectory techniques. The values of the model parameters physically relevant to polymer systems naturally lead to a separation of time scales, with the ultra-fast dynamics corresponding to energy transfer from the exciton to the internal phonon modes (i.e., the C-C bond oscillations), while the longer time dynamics correspond to damping of these phonon modes by the external dissipation. Associated with these time scales, we investigate the following processes that are indicative of the system relaxing onto the emissive chromophores of the polymer: (1) Exciton-polaron formation occurs on an ultra-fast time scale, with the associated exciton-phonon correlations present within half a vibrational time period of the C-C bond oscillations. (2) Exciton decoherence is driven by the decay in the vibrational overlaps associated with exciton-polaron formation, occurring on the same time scale. (3) Exciton density localization is driven by the external dissipation, arising from “wavefunction collapse” occurring as a result of the system-environment interactions. Finally, we show how fluorescence anisotropy measurements can be used to investigate the exciton decoherence process during the relaxation dynamics.

Concepts: Time, Photon, Energy, Quantum mechanics, Fundamental physics concepts, Classical mechanics, Musical scale, Wave function collapse

0

The Bloch equation of the nuclear magnetization of spin-½ nuclei in molecules, which have permanent electric dipole moments μe that are placed simultaneously in a magnetic field B and an electric field E, is derived. It is shown that if the principal components of the nuclear magnetic shielding tensor σ and the dipole moment μe are known, then the measurement of the transverse component to the magnetic field B of the nuclear magnetization, which is induced by the application of the electric field oscillating at the half of the spin precession frequency, allows determining the orientation of the dipole moment μe with respect to the principal axis system of the symmetric part of the tensor σ. Four-component relativistic density functional theory computations, which have been performed for several molecules containing heavy nuclei, i.e., 207Pb, 205Tl, 199Hg, 195Pt, and 125Te, indicate that coefficients of the relaxation matrix perturbed by the electric field E are in favorable cases of the order of 1000 pm2 V-2 T-2. Therefore, the spin dynamics is perturbed at experimentally observable levels for the strengths of electric and magnetic fields E = 5 kV/mm and B = 10 T, respectively.

Concepts: Electron, Electromagnetism, Magnetic field, Quantum mechanics, Fundamental physics concepts, Nuclear magnetic resonance, Magnetism, Permeability

0

We present an extrapolation scheme for the correlation energy in many-body theory that requires only a relatively small fraction of the orbitals spanning the virtual space but recovers nearly the whole dynamic correlation energy, independently of the single- or multi-reference nature of the problem. Applications to both ground-state chemistry and photochemistry are discussed that clearly show how such an extrapolation scheme can be used to overcome the scaling walls in ab initio quantum chemistry arising from the sheer number of molecular orbitals needed for very accurate calculations.

Concepts: Quantum mechanics, Physics, Matter, Chemistry, Chemical bond, Computational chemistry, Quantum chemistry, Classical mechanics

0

Low-temperature chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of B-C thin films is of importance for neutron voltaics and semiconductor technology. The highly reactive trialkylboranes, with alkyl groups of 1-4 carbon atoms, are a class of precursors that have been less explored for low-temperature CVD of B-C films. Herein, we demonstrate plasma CVD of B-C thin films using triethylboron (TEB) as a single source precursor in an Ar plasma. We show that the film density and B/C ratio increases with increasing plasma power, reaching a density of 2.20 g/cm3 and B/C = 1.7. This is attributed to a more intense energetic bombardment during deposition and more complete dissociation of the TEB molecule in the plasma at higher plasma power. The hydrogen content in the films ranges between 14 and 20 at. %. Optical emission spectroscopy of the plasma shows that BH, CH, C2, and H are the optically active plasma species from TEB. We suggest a plasma chemical model based on β-hydrogen elimination of C2H4 to form BH3, in which BH3 and C2H4 are then dehydrogenated to form BH and C2H2. Furthermore, C2H2 decomposes in the plasma to produce C2 and CH, which together with BH and possibly BH3-x(C2H5)x are the film forming species.

Concepts: Optics, Hydrogen, Chemistry, Atom, Chemical bond, Chemical element, Alkane, Chemical vapor deposition

0

Molecular junctions, where single molecules are bound to metal or semiconductor electrodes, represent a unique architecture to investigate molecules in a distinct nonequilibrium situation and, in a broader context, to study basic mechanisms of charge and energy transport in a many-body quantum system at the nanoscale. Experimental studies of molecular junctions have revealed a wealth of interesting transport phenomena, the understanding of which necessitates theoretical modeling. The accurate theoretical description of quantum transport in molecular junctions is challenging because it requires methods that are capable to describe the electronic structure and dynamics of molecules in a condensed phase environment out of equilibrium, in some cases with strong electron-electron and/or electronic-vibrational interaction. This perspective discusses recent progress in the theory and simulation of quantum transport in molecular junctions. Furthermore, challenges are identified, which appear crucial to achieve a comprehensive and quantitative understanding of transport in these systems.

Concepts: Electron, Quantum mechanics, Fundamental physics concepts, Physics, Matter, Condensed matter physics, Chemistry, Atom

0

We investigate percolation in mixtures of nanorods in the presence of external fields that align or disalign the particles with the field axis. Such conditions are found in the formulation and processing of nanocomposites, where the field may be electric, magnetic, or due to elongational flow. Our focus is on the effect of length polydispersity, which-in the absence of a field-is known to produce a percolation threshold that scales with the inverse weight average of the particle length. Using a model of non-interacting spherocylinders in conjunction with connectedness percolation theory, we show that a quadrupolar field always increases the percolation threshold and that the universal scaling with the inverse weight average no longer holds if the field couples to the particle length. Instead, the percolation threshold becomes a function of higher moments of the length distribution, where the order of the relevant moments crucially depends on the strength and type of field applied. The theoretical predictions compare well with the results of our Monte Carlo simulations, which eliminate finite size effects by exploiting the fact that the universal scaling of the wrapping probability function holds even in anisotropic systems. Theory and simulation demonstrate that the percolation threshold of a polydisperse mixture can be lower than that of the individual components, confirming recent work based on a mapping onto a Bethe lattice as well as earlier computer simulations involving dipole fields. Our work shows how the formulation of nanocomposites may be used to compensate for the adverse effects of aligning fields that are inevitable under practical manufacturing conditions.

Concepts: Scientific method, Simulation, Probability theory, Monte Carlo, Monte Carlo method, Computer simulation

0

We present a novel coarse-grain particle-based simulation technique for modeling self-developing flow of dilute and semi-dilute polymer solutions. The central idea in this paper is the two-way coupling between a mesoscopic polymer model and a phenomenological fluid model. As our polymer model, we choose Responsive Particle Dynamics (RaPiD), a Brownian dynamics method, which formulates the so-called “conservative” and “transient” pair-potentials through which the polymers interact besides experiencing random forces in accordance with the fluctuation dissipation theorem. In addition to these interactions, our polymer blobs are also influenced by the background solvent velocity field, which we calculate by solving the Navier-Stokes equation discretized on a moving grid of fluid blobs using the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) technique. While the polymers experience this frictional force opposing their motion relative to the background flow field, our fluid blobs also in turn are influenced by the motion of the polymers through an interaction term. This makes our technique a two-way coupling algorithm. We have constructed this interaction term in such a way that momentum is conserved locally, thereby preserving long range hydrodynamics. Furthermore, we have derived pairwise fluctuation terms for the velocities of the fluid blobs using the Fokker-Planck equation, which have been alternatively derived using the General Equation for the Non-Equilibrium Reversible-Irreversible Coupling (GENERIC) approach in Smoothed Dissipative Particle Dynamics (SDPD) literature. These velocity fluctuations for the fluid may be incorporated into the velocity updates for our fluid blobs to obtain a thermodynamically consistent distribution of velocities. In cases where these fluctuations are insignificant, however, these additional terms may well be dropped out as they are in a standard SPH simulation. We have applied our technique to study the rheology of two different concentrations of our model linear polymer solutions. The results show that the polymers and the fluid are coupled very well with each other, showing no lag between their velocities. Furthermore, our results show non-Newtonian shear thinning and the characteristic flattening of the Poiseuille flow profile typically observed for polymer solutions.

Concepts: Fluid dynamics, Continuum mechanics, Force, Fluid mechanics, Viscosity, Fluid, Non-Newtonian fluid, Navier–Stokes equations

0

Inelastic scattering of H and D atoms from the (111) surfaces of six fcc transition metals (Au, Pt, Ag, Pd, Cu, and Ni) was investigated, and in each case, excitation of electron-hole pairs dominates the inelasticity. The results are very similar for all six metals. Differences in the average kinetic energy losses between metals can mainly be attributed to different efficiencies in the coupling to phonons due to the different masses of the metal atoms. The experimental observations can be reproduced by molecular dynamics simulations based on full-dimensional potential energy surfaces and including electronic excitations by using electronic friction in the local density friction approximation. The determining factors for the energy loss are the electron density at the surface, which is similar for all six metals, and the mass ratio between the impinging atoms and the surface atoms. Details of the electronic structure of the metal do not play a significant role. The experimentally validated simulations are used to explore sticking over a wide range of incidence conditions. We find that the sticking probability increases for H and D collisions near normal incidence-consistent with a previously reported penetration-resurfacing mechanism. The sticking probability for H or D on any of these metals may be represented as a simple function of the incidence energy, Ein, metal atom mass, M, and incidence angle, 𝜗in. S=(S0+a⋅Ein+b⋅M)*(1-h(𝜗in-c)(1-cos(𝜗in-c)d⋅h(Ein-e)(Ein-e))), where h is the Heaviside step function and for H, S0 = 1.081, a = -0.125 eV-1, b=-8.40⋅10-4 u-1, c = 28.88°, d = 1.166 eV-1, and e = 0.442 eV; whereas for D, S0 = 1.120, a = -0.124 eV-1, b=-1.20⋅10-3 u-1, c = 28.62°, d = 1.196 eV-1, and e = 0.474 eV.

Concepts: Energy, Atom, Mass, Metal, Kinetic energy, Force, Potential energy, Electron configuration

0

Studies of the Gaussian core model (GCM) have shown that it behaves like a mean-field model and the properties are quite different from standard glass former. In this work, we investigate the entropies, namely, the excess entropy (Sex) and the configurational entropy (Sc) and their different components to address these anomalies. Our study corroborates most of the earlier observations and also sheds new light on the high and low temperature dynamics. We find that unlike in standard glass former where high temperature dynamics is dominated by two-body correlation and low temperature by many-body correlations, in the GCM both high and low temperature dynamics are dominated by many-body correlations. We also find that the many-body entropy which is usually positive at low temperatures and is associated with activated dynamics is negative in the GCM suggesting suppression of activation. Interestingly despite the suppression of activation, the Adam-Gibbs (AG) relation that describes activated dynamics holds in the GCM, thus suggesting a non-activated contribution in AG relation. We also find an overlap between the AG relation and mode coupling power law regime leading to a power law behavior of Sc. From our analysis of this power law behavior, we predict that in the GCM the high temperature dynamics will disappear at dynamical transition temperature and below that there will be a transition to the activated regime. Our study further reveals that the activated regime in the GCM is quite narrow.

Concepts: Energy, Fundamental physics concepts, Temperature, Thermodynamics, Heat, Entropy, Absolute zero, Configuration entropy

0

X-ray scattering measurements were utilized to probe the effects of pressure on a series of ionic liquids, N-alkyl-N-methyl-pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (Pyr1A-TFSI) (A = 3, 6, and 9), along with mixtures of ionic liquid and 30 mol. % lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) salt. No evidence was found for crystallization of the pure ionic liquids or salt mixtures even at pressures up to 9.2 GPa. No phase separation or demixing was observed for the ionic liquid and salt mixtures. Shifts in the peak positions are indicative of compression of the ionic liquids and mixtures up to 2 GPa, after which samples reach a region of relative incompressibility, possibly indicative of a transition to a glassy state. With the application of pressure, the intensity of the prepeak was found to decrease significantly, indicating a reduction in cation alkyl chain aggregation. Additionally, incompressibility of the scattering peak associated with the distance between like-charges in the pure ionic liquids compared to that in mixtures with lithium salt suggests that the application of pressure could inhibit Li+ coordination with TFSI- to form Li[TFSI2]- complexes. This inhibition occurs through the suppression of TFSI- in the trans conformer, in favor of the smaller cis conformer, at high pressures.

Concepts: Crystal, Solid, Viscosity, Sodium, Ionic liquid, Gas, Glass transition, Ions