SciCombinator

Discover the most talked about and latest scientific content & concepts.

Journal: The Korean journal of internal medicine

142

The clinical manifestations of Behcet disease (BD) have been reported to differ according to country, region, and race. Gender, onset age, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B51 have also been known as the factors that influence the clinical features of BD. The aim of this study is to investigate the clinical phenotypes of Korean patients who visited the rheumatology clinic with BD with respect to gender, onset age, and HLA-B51.

Concepts: Immune system, Medicine, Death, Human leukocyte antigen, Hangul, Behçet's disease, Hulusi Behçet, HLA-B51

138

Behçet’s disease (BD) is a chronic, idiopathic, relapsing immune-mediated disease involving multiple organs, and is characterized by recurrent oral and genital ulcers, ocular disease, gastrointestinal ulcers, vascular diseases, and skin lesions. In particular, gastrointestinal involvement in BD is followed by severe complications, including massive bleeding, bowel perforation, and fistula, which can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. However, the management of intestinal BD has not yet been properly established. Intestinal BD patients with a severe clinical course experience frequent disease aggravations and often require recurrent corticosteroid and/or immunomodulatory therapies, or even surgery. However, a considerable number of patients with intestinal BD are often refractory to conventional therapies such as corticosteroids and immunomodulators. Recently, there has been a line of evidence suggesting that biologics such as infliximab and adalimumab are effective in treating intestinal BD. Moreover, new biologics targeting proteins other than tumor necrosis factor α are emerging and are under active investigation. Therefore, in this paper, we review the current therapeutic strategies and new clinical data for the treatment of intestinal BD.

138

The Crohn’s and Colitis Knowledge (CCKNOW) score does not reflect updated knowledge relating to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aim of this study was to develop, validate, and apply a novel tool to measure disease-related knowledge in IBD patients.

Concepts: Inflammation, Biopsy, Ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, Colonoscopy, Gastroenterology, Inflammatory bowel disease, Helminthic therapy

138

Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have been found to show markedly increased rates of end-stage renal disease, major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events (MACCEs), and mortality. Therefore, new biomarkers are required for the early detection of such clinical outcomes in patients with CKD. We aimed to determine whether the level of circulating renalase was associated with CKD progression, MACCEs, and all-cause mortality, using data from a prospective randomized controlled study, Kremezin STudy Against Renal disease progression in Korea (K-STAR; NCT 00860431).

Concepts: Renal failure, Chronic kidney disease, Kidney, Nephrology, Erythropoietin

23

Diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) lead to elevation of reactive oxygen species, which can activate the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor (NLR) family members containing the pyrin domain 3 (NLRP3)-inf lammasome. In this study, we elucidated whether NLRP3 -inf lammasome is activated by DEPs and whether antioxidants (N-acetylcysteine [NAC]) could inhibit such activation.

Concepts: Protein, Oxygen, Lung, Mitochondrion, Gasoline, Oxidative phosphorylation, Reactive oxygen species, Glutathione

2

Recent advances in genome editing with programmable nucleases have opened up new avenues for multiple applications, from basic research to clinical therapy. The ease of use of the technology-and particularly clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-will allow us to improve our understanding of genomic variation in disease processes via cellular and animal models. Here, we highlight the progress made in correcting gene mutations in monogenic hereditary disorders and discuss various CRISPR-associated applications, such as cancer research, synthetic biology, and gene therapy using induced pluripotent stem cells. The challenges, ethical issues, and future prospects of CRISPR-based systems for human research are also discussed.

Concepts: DNA, Gene, Genetics, Cancer, Stem cell, Stem cells, Biotechnology, Induced pluripotent stem cell

2

Cardiotoxicity is a well-known complication following treatment with anthracyclines. However, they are still widely used in chemotherapy for breast cancer, lymphoma, leukemia, and sarcoma, among others. Patient clinical characteristics, such as age, sex, comorbidities, anthracycline dose and infusion schedule, and the combined anti-cancer agents used, are diverse among cancer types. It is difficult to recommend guidelines for the prevention or management of anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity applicable to all cancer types. Therefore, anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity remains a major limitation in the proper management of cancer patients treated with an anthracycline-combined regimen. Efforts have been extensive to determine the mechanism and treatment of anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity. Because cardiotoxicity causes irreversible damage to the myocardium, prevention is a more effective approach than treatment of cardiotoxicity after symptomatic or asymptomatic cardiac dysfunction develops. This article will review the pathophysiological mechanisms of anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity and strategies for protecting the myocardium from anthracycline.

Concepts: Cancer, Breast cancer, Chemotherapy, Leukemia, Lymphoma, Chemotherapy regimens, Doxorubicin, Anthracycline

1

Studies investigating diabetic nephropathy (DN) have mostly focused on interpreting the pathologic molecular mechanisms of DN, which may provide valuable tools for early diagnosis and prevention of disease onset and progression. Currently, there are few therapeutic drugs for DN, which mainly consist of antihypertensive and antiproteinuric measures that arise from strict renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inactivation. However, these traditional therapies are suboptimal and there is a clear, unmet need for treatments that offer effective schemes beyond glucose control. The complexity and heterogeneity of the DN entity, along with ambiguous renal endpoints that may deter accurate appraisal of new drug potency, contribute to a worsening of the situation. To address these issues, current research into original therapies to treat DN is focusing on the intrinsic renal pathways that intervene with intracellular signaling of anti-inflammatory, antifibrotic, and metabolic pathways. Mounting evidence in support of the favorable metabolic effects of these novel agents with respect to the renal aspects of DN supports the likelihood of systemic beneficial effects as well. Thus, when translated into clinical use, these novel agents would also address the comorbid factors associated with diabetes, such as obesity and risk of cardiovascular disease. This review will provide a discussion of the promising and effective therapeutic agents for the management of DN.

Concepts: Kidney, Medicine, Nutrition, Myocardial infarction, Diabetes mellitus, Glucose, Diabetic nephropathy, Blood sugar

0

Increased understanding of the immunopathology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has led to the development of targeted therapies and has unlocked a new era in IBD treatment. The development of treatment options aimed at a variety of pathological mechanisms offers new hope for customized therapies. Beyond anti-tumor necrosis factor agents, selective lymphocyte trafficking inhibitors have been proposed as potent drugs for IBD. Among these, vedolizumab has recently been approved for both Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Numerous other agents for IBD treatment are currently under investigation, including Janus kinase inhibitors, anti-mucosal vascular addressin cell adhesion molecule-1 agents, an anti-SMAD7 antisense oligonucleotide, an anti-interleukin-12/23 monoclonal antibody, and a sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor-1 selective agonist. These agents will likely expand the treatment options available for the management of IBD patients in the future. In this review, we discuss the efficacy and safety of novel agents currently under investigation in IBD clinical trials.

0

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease, and the prevalence of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) with fibrosis is increasing as the population with NAFLD ages. To date, lifestyle modifications including weight loss, increased physical activity, and dietary changes remain the treatment of choice for NAFLD because there are no approved effective pharmacologic agents. Increased physical activity has therapeutic effects on NAFLD by reducing hepatic fat independent of weight reduction. Indeed, even minimal physical activity below the recommended threshold may have a beneficial impact on NAFLD. Aerobic activity and resistance training have similar effects on NAFLD. Universal recommendations for the optimal intensity and dose of physical activity have not been established. Therefore, physical activity should be tailored based on a patient’s clinical characteristics, comorbidities, and fitness capacity. Physical activity also prevents the development of NAFLD and may represent a valuable strategy for reducing the public health burden. However, there are insufficient data supporting the effects of physical activity on the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver to NASH with advanced fibrosis, and on extrahepatic disease-related morbidity and mortality. In this paper, we review the role of physical activity in the management of NAFLD.