SciCombinator

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Journal: Journal of phycology

22

The diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum was cultured in five different growth regimes to obtain cells with different composition. Pairs of populations subjected to different treatments were then mixed in a communal culture regime that differed from those of the origin. After six hours, the ratio between the two populations was verified by flow cytometry. Alterations in this ratio were found when cells previously grown at 1 mM NH4+were mixed with GeO2- and 0.5 mM NH4+-grown cells. The nutritional background may thus make cells differently suited to new environmental conditions and afford advantages in terms of reproductive potential. Competitive interactions between populations may result from the differences in the expressed proteome and/or in the availability of tools for regulatory responses. This may have relevance to the persistence of phenotypically neutral variants present in the population best suited to the new condition, after the interaction of the conspecifics with different nutritional histories. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Concepts: Protein, Sociology, Flow cytometry, All rights reserved, Diatom, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Diatoms, Copyright

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Long distance dispersal plays a key role in evolution, facilitating allopatric divergence, range expansions, and species movement in response to environmental change. Even species that seem poorly suited to dispersal can sometimes travel long distances, for example via hitchhiking with other, more intrinsically dispersive species. In marine macroalgae, buoyancy can enable adults - and diverse hitchhikers - to drift long distances, but the evolution and role of this trait is poorly understood. The southern bull kelp genus Durvillaea includes several non-buoyant and buoyant species, including some that have only recently been recognized. In revising the genus, we not only provide updated identification tools and describe two new species (D. incurvata comb. nov. from Chile, and D. fenestrata sp. nov. from the Antipodes Islands), but also carry out biogeographic analyses to determine the evolutionary history of buoyancy in the genus. Although the ancestral state was resolved as non-buoyant, the distribution of species suggests that this trait has been both gained and lost, possibly more than once. We conclude that although buoyancy is a trait that can be useful for dispersal (creating evolutionary pressure for its gain) there is also evolutionary pressure for its loss as it restricts species to narrow environmental ranges (i.e., shallow depths).

1

A redefinition of the cyanobacterial lineage has been proposed based on phylogenomic analysis of distantly related non-phototrophic lineages. We define Cyanobacteria here as “Organisms in the domain bacteria able to carry out oxygenic photosynthesis with water as an electron donor and to reduce carbon dioxide as a source of carbon, or those secondarily evolved from such organisms.”

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Prasinophytes (Chlorophyta) are a diverse, paraphyletic group of planktonic microalgae for which benthic species are largely unknown. Here, we report a sand-dwelling, marine prasinophyte with several novel features observed in clonal cultures established from numerous locations around Australia. The new genus and species, which we name Microrhizoidea pickettheapsiorum (Mamiellophyceae), alternates between a benthic palmelloid colony, where cell division occurs, and a planktonic flagellate. Flagellates are short lived, settle and quickly resorb their flagella, the basal bodies then nucleate novel tubular appendages, termed “microrhizoids”, that lack an axoneme and function to anchor benthic cells to the substratum. To our knowledge, microrhizoids have not been observed in any other green alga or protist, are slightly smaller in diameter than flagella, generally contain 9 microtubules, are long (3-5 times the length of flagella) and are not encased in scales. Following settlement, cell divisions result in a loose, palmelloid colony, each cell connected to the substratum by two microrhizoids. Flagellates are round to bean-shaped with two long, slightly uneven flagella. Both benthic cells and flagellates, along with their flagella, are encased in thin scales. Phylogenies based on the complete chloroplast genome of Microrhizoidea show it is clearly a member of the Mamiellophyceae, most closely related to Dolichomastix tenuilepsis. More taxon-rich phylogenetic analyses of the 18S rRNA gene, including metabarcodes from the Tara Oceans and Ocean Sampling Day projects, confidently show the distinctive nature of Microrhizoidea, and that the described biodiversity of the Mamiellophyceae is a fraction of its real biodiversity. The discovery of a largely benthic prasinophyte changes our perspective on this group of algae and, along with the observation of other potential benthic lineages in environmental sequences, illustrates that benthic habitats can be a rich ground for algal biodiscovery. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

1

Cyanobacterial diversity associated with sponges remains underestimated, though it is of great scientific interest in order to understand the ecology and evolutionary history of the symbiotic relationships between the two groups. Of the filamentous cyanobacteria, the genus Leptolyngbya is the most frequently found in association with sponges as well as the largest and obviously polyphyletic group. In this study, five Leptolyngbya-like sponge-associated isolates were investigated using a combination of molecular, chemical, and morphological approach and revealed a novel marine genus herein designated Leptothoe gen. nov. In addition, three new species of Leptothoe, Le. sithoniana, Le. kymatousa and Le. spongobia, are described based on a suite of distinct characters compared to other marine Leptolyngbyaceae species/strains. The three new species, hosted by four sponge species, showed different degrees of host specificity. Leptothoe sithoniana and Le. kymatousa hosted by the sponges Petrosia ficiformis and Chondrilla nucula respectively, seem to be more specialized than Le. spongobia, which was hosted by the sponges Dysidea avara and Acanthella acuta. All three species contained nitrogen-fixing genes and may contribute to the nitrogen budget of sponges. Leptothoe spongobia TAU-MAC 1115 isolated from Acanthella acuta, was shown to produce microcystin-RR, indicating that microcystin production among marine cyanobacteria could be more widespread than previously determined. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

1

A marine, sand-dwelling, golden-brown alga is described from clonal cultures established from a high intertidal pool in southeastern Australia. This tiny, unicellular species, which we call the “golden paradox” (Chrysoparadoxa australica gen. et sp. nov.), is benthic, surrounded by a multilayered cell wall and attached to the substratum by a complex adhesive plug. Each vegetative cell gives rise to a single, naked zoospore with heterokont flagella that settles and may become briefly amoeboid prior to dividing. Daughter cells are initially amoeboid, then either permanently attach and return to the benthic stage or become motile again prior to final settlement. Two deeply lobed chloroplasts occupy opposite ends of the cell and are surrounded by only two membranes. The outer chloroplast membrane is continuous between the two chloroplasts via the outer membrane of the nuclear envelope. Only two membranes occupy the chloroplast-nucleus interface, the inner membrane of the nuclear envelope and the inner chloroplast membrane. A small pyrenoid is found in each chloroplast and closely abuts the nucleus or protrudes into it. It contains an unusual, membrane bound inclusion that stains with SYBR green but is unlikely to be a nucleomorph. Phylogenies inferred from a 10-gene concatenated alignment show an early-branching position within the PX clade. The unusual morphological features and phylogenetic position indicate C. australica should be classified as a new class, Chrysoparadoxophyceae. Despite an atypical plastid, exploration of the C. australica transcriptome revealed typical heterokont protein targeting to the plastid. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

1

Maintaining buoyancy with gas-filled floats (pneumatocysts) is essential for some subtidal kelps to achieve an upright stature and compete for light used for photosynthesis. However, as these kelps grow up through the water column, pneumatocysts are exposed to substantial changes in hydrostatic pressure, which could cause complications as internal gases may expand or contract, potentially causing them to rupture, flood, and lose buoyancy. In this study, we investigate how pneumatocysts of Nereocystis luetkeana resist biomechanical stress and maintain buoyancy as they develop across a hydrostatic gradient. We measured internal pressure, material properties, and pneumatocyst geometry across a range of thallus sizes and collection depths to identify strategies used to resist pressure-induced mechanical failure. Contrary to expectations, all pneumatocysts had internal pressures less than atmospheric pressure, ensuring that thalli are always exposed to a positive pressure gradient and compressional loads, indicating that they are more likely to buckle than rupture at all depths. Small pneumatocysts collected from depths between 1 and 9 m (inner radius = 0.4 - 1.0 cm) were demonstrated to have elevated wall stresses under high compressive loads and are at greatest risk of buckling. Although small kelps do not adjust pneumatocyst material properties or geometry to reduce wall stress as they grow, they are about 3.4 times stronger than they need to be to resist hydrostatic buckling. When tested, pneumatocysts buckled around 35 m depth, which agrees with previous measures of lower limits due to light attenuation, suggesting that hydrostatic pressure may also define the lower limit of Nereocystis in the field. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

1

Early life stages of marine organisms are predicted to be vulnerable to ocean acidification. For macroalgae, reproduction and population persistence rely on spores to settle, adhere and continue the algal life cycle, yet the effect of ocean acidification on this critical life stage has been largely overlooked. We explicitly tested the biomechanical impact of reduced pH on early spore adhesion. We developed a shear flume to examine the effect of reduced pH on spore attachment time and strength in two intertidal rhodophyte macroalgae, one calcified (Corallina vancouveriensis) and one non-calcified (Polyostea robusta). Reduced pH delayed spore attachment of both species by 40-52% and weakened attachment strength in C. vancouveriensis, causing spores to dislodge at lower flow-induced shear forces, but had no effect on the attachment strength of P. robusta. Results are consistent with our prediction that reduced pH disrupts proper curing and gel formation of spore adhesives (anionic polysaccharides and glycoproteins) via protonation and cation displacement, although experimental verification is needed. Our results demonstrate that ocean acidification negatively, and differentially, impacts spore adhesion in two macroalgae. If results hold in field conditions, reduced ocean pH has the potential to impact macroalgal communities via spore dysfunction, regardless of the physiological tolerance of mature thalli. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Concepts: Algae, Reproduction, Plant, Oceanography, Asexual reproduction, Ocean, Copyright, Ocean acidification

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Twenty-six cultures of the harmful marine dinoflagellate Karlodinium, isolated from Japanese and Philippine coastal waters, were examined using LM, SEM and molecular phylogeny inferred from ITS and LSU rDNA. Seven Karlodinium species (6 from Japan and 4 from Philippines), K. australe, K. ballantinum, K. decipiens, K. gentienii, K. veneficum, K. zhouanum, and a novel species Karlodinium azanzae sp. nov., were identified based on their morphology and phylogenetic positions. Karlodinium azanzae from Manila Bay, Philippines was further characterized by TEM, HPLC (chloroplast pigment) and bioassay on brine shrimp and other marine zooplankton. Cells of K. azanzae were the largest (mean 25.3 ┬Ám long) in Karlodinium, possessed numerous tiny reflective particles, starch grains and lipid granules, and usually swam at the bottom of the culture vessel. The straight apical structure complex and a ventral pore were common to the genus. The longitudinally elongated nucleus was located at the center, and the yellowish chloroplasts contained an embedded pyrenoid and carotenoid pigments typical of the genus (i.e., fucoxanthin as major carotenoid with its derivatives). TEM revealed a part of the flagellar apparatus, of which the long striated ventral connective is the first report in the Kareniaceae. Phylogenetic trees showed closest affinity of K. azanzae with K. australe and K. armiger. The new species could be differentiated from related species by cell size, position of the nucleus, and characteristic swimming behavior. Lethality of K. azanzae to large zooplankton and micropredation using a developed peduncle were also observed.

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Nitric oxide (NO) is widely recognized as an important transmitter molecule in biological systems, from animals to plants and microbes. However, the role of NO in marine photosynthetic microbes remains unclear and even less is known about the role of this metabolite in Antarctic sea-ice diatoms. By using a combination of microsensors, microfluidic chambers and artificial sea-ice tanks, a basic mechanistic insight into NO’s dynamics within the Antarctic sea-ice diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus was obtained. Results suggest that NO production in F. cylindrus is nitrite-dependent via nitrate reductase. NO production was abolished upon exposure to light but could be induced in the light when normal photosynthetic electron flow was disrupted. The addition of exogenous NO to cellular suspensions of F. cylindrus negatively influenced growth, disrupted photosynthesis and altered non-photochemical dissipation mechanisms. NO production was also observed when cells were exposed to stressful salinity and temperature regimes. These results suggest that during periods of environmental stress, NO could be produced in F. cylindrus as a “stress signal” molecule.