SciCombinator

Discover the most talked about and latest scientific content & concepts.

Journal: Journal of family nursing

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This article is the third part of a hermeneutic research study examining the impact of childhood cancer experiences on the parental relationship. In Part 1, we offered an exploration of the phenomenon with background literature; a description of the research question, method, and design; and finally a discussion of relationships that survived, thrived, or demised, with an emphasis on the notions of difference and trading. In Part 2, we furthered the interpretations to look at the complexities of issues such as teams, roles, focus, protection, intimacy, grieving, putting relationships on hold, and reclaiming them. In this article, we discuss the advice that the participants offered us and how that advice might have implications for other parents in similar situations and health care professionals working with families experiencing childhood cancer.

Concepts: Family, Health care, Health care provider, Healthcare, Parent, Interpersonal relationship, Mother, Father

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This article is the first of a three-part report of a research study that used hermeneutic inquiry to examine the effects of childhood cancer on the relationship between the parents of the child. In Part 1, we identity the topic of investigation and the relevant literature; describe the research question, method, and design; and begin our interpretations of the data with a focus on the couples who remained together and those who experienced relationship demise. In this analysis, we discovered that issues of difference and trading played a strong role in how the couples fared in their relationships. In Part 2 of this series, we focus on further interpretations, and in Part 3, we discuss the implications of the study for other parents and for health care professionals.

Concepts: Health care, Health care provider, Relationship, Parent, Knowledge

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Much has been written about the global implementation of the Calgary Family Assessment and Intervention Models (CFAM/CFIM) and the application of these practice models in various clinical settings. The purpose of this article is to provide a brief update on the background of CFAM/CFIM, and the current applications of the models as evidenced in the English-language literature. Little has been written about the use of CFAM/CFIM in a personal context, however. As originators of the models, we offer our own narratives and reflections about the reciprocity between the personal and professional applications of our models and the ways that our personal experiences have extended our understanding about the utility of the models for clinical practice with families.

Concepts: Family, Linguistics, The Current, Extended family, System software, Application software

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Illness beliefs affect how individuals and families deal with illness. A valid and reliable instrument has not yet been developed to measure “illness beliefs” in family nursing research and clinical practice. This article describes the purpose, reliability, validity, and the potential clinical and research applications of a new instrument, the Iceland-Family Illness Beliefs Questionnaire (ICE-FIBQ). The ICE-FIBQ is a short, self-report measure of an individual’s beliefs about illness. Drawing from an advanced nursing practice model called the Illness Beliefs Model, the instrument was developed to measure illness beliefs about (a) cause of illness, that is, etiology; (b) control of illness on family and control of family on illness; © effect of illness on the individual and family; (d) illness suffering; and (e) support received from health care professionals during illness. The instrument was tested on 139 family caregivers of adolescents/youth with an illness or a disorder. Exploratory factor analysis reduced the original questionnaire from eight to seven items with a one-factor solution (Cronbach’s α = .780). Confirmatory factor analysis supported the one-factor solution (Cronbach’s α = .789). Further research is needed to determine concurrent validity with other illness belief/illness perception scales and if the instrument is sensitive to capture change in illness beliefs following family nursing intervention.

Concepts: Health care, Educational psychology, Psychometrics, Factor analysis, General intelligence factor, Validity, Reliability, Confirmatory factor analysis

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This article reports the development and preliminary testing of a new scale named “Partnership Scale for Primary Family Caregivers Caring for Patients With Dementia” that measures the ability of primary family caregivers to establish partnerships while providing care for patients with dementia in Japan. The first draft of the scale was developed using qualitative data from interviews with five primary family caregivers; a pool of 39 items was created through a review process with dementia care experts and researchers. An exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis were conducted with data from 261 primary family caregivers who completed the instrument. This resulted in a multidimensional scale that consists of three factors with 13 items. The suitability of the model and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) values (1, 1) obtained by the test-retest method satisfied statistical standards. The criterion-related validity of the scale was significantly correlated to an external reference, which was the desired outcome. However, some subscales exhibited low internal consistency, demonstrating the need for further research.

Concepts: Statistics, Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, Educational psychology, Psychometrics, Factor analysis, Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient, Covariance and correlation, Confirmatory factor analysis

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There is a need for a suitable instrument for the Swedish context that could measure family members' perceptions of cognitive and emotional support received from nurses. The purpose of this study was to translate and test the psychometric properties of the Swedish version of the Iceland-Family Perceived Support Questionnaire (ICE-FPSQ) and, further, to report perceptions of support from nurses by family members of children with congenital heart defects (CHDs). A sample of 97 parents of children with CHD, living in Sweden, completed the Swedish translation of ICE-FPSQ. The Swedish version of ICE-FPSQ was found to be reliable and valid in this context. Parents scored perceived family support provided by nurses working in pediatric outpatient clinics as low, which suggests that nurses in these outpatient contexts in Sweden offered family nursing only sparingly.

Concepts: Psychology, Cognition, Perception, Mind, Sweden, Congenital heart defect, Congenital heart disease, Translation

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Individual behavior affects and is affected by other people. The aim of this study was to examine if emotional distress in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and their spouses was associated with their own and their partner’s perceived health. Participants included 91 dyads of patients and their spouses. Emotional distress was measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and perceived health was measured with the Short Form 36 Health Survey. The Actor-Partner Interdependence Model was used for dyad-level analyses of associations, using structural equation modeling. Higher levels of anxiety and depression were associated with lower levels of perceived health in patients and spouses. Higher levels of depression in patients were associated with lower levels of vitality in spouses and vice versa. As AF patients and their spouses influence each other, health-care interventions should consider the dyad to address dyadic dynamics. This may benefit the health of the individual patient and of the couple.

Concepts: Health care provider, Psychology, Hospital, Atrial fibrillation, Illness, Dyadic, Dyad

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Caring culture is a concept embodying the perceptions and caring practices of caregivers, acknowledging the unique role of cultural beliefs in shaping behavior. A qualitative descriptive study with 13 caregivers of adult family members with a cancer diagnosis in Japan was conducted to gain insight into perceptions and experiences surrounding caregiving. Several major categories were identified, representing rarely reported cultural constructs of high cultural value for the Japanese: On-repayment for what the patient has given, Caregiving as performing a socially expected role, Enryo/meiwaku-restraint in asking for help, Family decision making reflecting strong bonds, Omoiyari-empathizing with the patient’s feelings, and Inori-praying to myriad gods and ancestors. The Japanese cultural construct of ie (the strong relationship to family lineage and spiritual connection to past and future generations) is helpful in understanding these categories. Invisible yet powerful cultural constructs permeated caregiving practices. Insights from Japanese cultural concepts and beliefs may foster sensitivity and individualized care in diverse settings, cultures, and societies.

Concepts: Family, Sociology, Cognition, Culture, Anthropology, Concept, The Culture, Society

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As part of the Heart Failure Family Trial presently being conducted in Denmark, this qualitative process evaluation explored the perceptions of seven practicing cardiac nurses who offered family nursing therapeutic conversations (FNTC) to families in three heart failure outpatient clinics. FNTC were guided by the Calgary Family Assessment and Intervention Models. Data consisted of 34 case reports written by the nurses which documented the use of FNTC, including family responses to the FNTC. A focus group interview with the six of the nurses about their experience of offering FNTC was also conducted. Content analysis was performed using a combined deductive and inductive process. Nurses reported developing a distinct, closer, and more constructive relationship with the patients and their families and reported FNTC increased family bonding and strengthened family relationships. The nurses considered FNTC to be feasible interventions in the routine care provided in heart failure outpatient clinics.

Concepts: Family, Focus group, Evaluation, Heart, Qualitative research, Interpersonal relationship, Kinship terminology, Cousin

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Stroke in midlife is a life altering, challenging experience for the whole family thereby necessitating a family approach to intervention. The aim of this study was to describe the experiences of 17 family members living in Sweden, including seven adult stroke patients (six males; one female) under the age of 65 who participated in a series of three nurse-led family conversations that were offered in each family’s home. These Family Health Conversations (FamHC) were guided by the conceptual lens of Family System Nursing. Individual, semi-structured, evaluative interviews conducted with each participant one month after the FamHC were analyzed by qualitative content analysis. The FamHC were described by family members as a unique conversation that they had not previously experienced in health care contexts. Family members described possibilities for relational sharing and meaningful conversations as well as changes in family functioning that support the suitability of FamHC for family stroke care.

Concepts: Family, Health care, Health care provider, Health, Evaluation methods, Experience, Content analysis, Family therapy