SciCombinator

Discover the most talked about and latest scientific content & concepts.

Journal: Journal of environmental management

28

The effect of dyeing auxiliaries on UV/H(2)O(2) removal of an indigoid dye, Acid Blue 74 (AB74) from the solution was investigated. The inhibition effect of anions including carbonate, bicarbonate and chloride on the process efficiency was evaluated in terms of color removal and total organic carbon (TOC) abatement. The presence of carbonate, bicarbonate and chloride anions had no considerable effect on the total decolorization time. However, the degradation efficiency of the process was enhanced by bicarbonate anion during the first 80 min of the process. During this period, the formation of active oxygen species such as CO(3)(-),HCO(4)(-)andO(2)(-) that participate in the degradation process of AB74 increases the degradation rate, in spite of the consumption of hydroxyl radicals by these anions. After this period, the overall efficiency was considerably decreased. Adding the chloride had less decreasing effect compared to the bicarbonate. The order of anions as AB74 degradation inhibitor in this study could be concluded as: [Formula: see text] .

Concepts: Oxygen, Carbon dioxide, Acid, Hydrogen, Carbon, Oxide, Ion, Chemical formula

28

Sustainability assessments of coastal beach exploitation are difficult because the identification of appropriate monitoring methodologies and evaluation procedures is still ongoing. In particular, the most suitable procedure for the application of sustainability assessment to coastal beaches remains uncertain. This paper presents a complete sustainability assessment process for coastal beach exploitation based on the analytic hierarchy process (AHP). We developed an assessment framework consisting of 14 indicators derived from the three dimensions of suitability, economic and social value, and ecosystem. We chose a wind power project on a coastal beach of Yancheng as a case study. The results indicated that the wind power farms on the coastal beach were not completely in keeping with sustainable development theory. The construction of the wind power farms had some negative impacts. Therefore, in the design stage, wind turbines should be designed and planned carefully to minimize these negative impacts. In addition, the case study demonstrated that the AHP was capable of addressing the complexities associated with the sustainability of coastal beaches.

Concepts: Assessment, Sustainability, Analytic Hierarchy Process, Renewable energy, Wind power, Wind farm, Wind turbine, Arithmetical hierarchy

28

Water shortages and the drive to recycle is increasing interest in reuse of reclaimed wastewater. Timely and cost-effective ways to detect fecal pollutants prior to reuse increases confidence of residents and neighbors concerned about reuse of reclaimed wastewater. The on-site wastewater treatment and reuse systems (OWTRS) used in this study include a septic tank, peat bioreactor, ClO(2) disinfection and land spray irrigation system. Bacteroides fragilis, Escherichiacoli and Enterococcus spp., were tested with immunomagnetic separation/ATP bioluminescence (IMS/ATP), qPCR and culture-based methods. The results displayed a 2-log reduction in fecal bacteria in the peat bioreactor and a 5-log reduction following chloride dioxide disinfection. The fecal bacteria levels measured by IMS/ATP correlated with qPCR results: HuBac 16S (R(2) = 0.903), Bf-group 16S (R(2) = 0.956), gyrB (R(2) = 0.673), and Ent 23S (R(2) = 0.724). This is the first study in which the newly developed human-specific IMS/ATP and previously developed IMS/ATP were applied for determining OWTRS efficiency. Results of the study revealed that IMS/ATP is a timely and cost-effective way to detect fecal contaminants, and results were validated with qPCR and culture based methods. The new IMS/ATP can also be applied broadly in the detection of human-originated fecal contamination.

Concepts: Bacteria, Gut flora, Sewage treatment, Wastewater, Denitrification, Reclaimed water, Septic tank, Greywater

28

Novel NH(2)-functionalized cellulose acetate (CA)/silica composite nanofibrous membranes were successfully prepared by sol-gel combined with electrospinning technology. Tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) as a silica source, CA as precursor and 3-ureidopropyltriethoxysilane as a coupling agent were used in membrane preparation. The membrane’s chemical and morphological structures were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images, X-ray diffraction (XRD), element analyzer, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and N(2) adsorption-desorption isotherms. The composite nanofibrous membranes exhibited high surface area and porosity. The membranes were used for Cr(VI) ion removal from aqueous solution through static and dynamic experiments. The adsorption behavior of Cr(VI) can be well described by the Langmuir adsorption model, and the maximum adsorption capacity for Cr(VI) is estimated to be 19.46 mg/g. The membrane can be conveniently regenerated by alkalization. Thus the composite membrane prepared from biodegradable raw material has potential applications in the field of water treatment.

Concepts: Electron, Electron microscope, Chemistry, Sol-gel, Transmission electron microscopy, Scanning electron microscope, Silicon dioxide, Tetraethyl orthosilicate

28

In this study, a method was proposed for calculating the thermodynamic entropy increase ΔS in a water body after receiving excess discharge of organics and nutrients in order to quantitatively assess the impact of pollutants discharge on aquatic systems. The enthalpy change was evaluated using the standard thermodynamic data according to the possible chemical and/or biochemical reactions such as organic oxidation, nitrification/denitrification, and phosphorus precipitation, for the recovery of water quality to the background level. A series of equations were established for calculating the ΔS associated with the decomposition or removal of TOC, NO(3)-N, NO(2)-N, NH(3)-N and TP. The values of ΔS corresponding to unit mass (per g) of these pollutants were calculated as 54.0 kJ/K, 2.91 kJ/K, 10.01 kJ/K, 28.51 kJ/K and 2.81 kJ/K, respectively. Besides, the applicability of the proposed method was proved by a scenario analysis regarding effluent quality control and surface water quality protection in China.

Concepts: Energy, Evaluation, Water, Thermodynamics, Entropy, Gibbs free energy, Enthalpy, Thermodynamic databases for pure substances

28

Various technologies have been used for the treatment and remediation of areas contaminated by BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes), which are organic compounds that are of particular concern due to their toxicity. Potential applications of synthetic zeolites for environmental fieldwork have also been reported worldwide. In this work, a hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium (HDTMA) surfactant-modified synthetic zeolite was investigated for its efficiency in removing BTEX from aqueous solutions. Three surfactant-modified zeolites were synthesized, with amounts of surfactant corresponding to 50%, 100%, and 200% of the total cation-exchange capacity (CEC) of the synthetic zeolite Y. The results of the BTEX adsorption experiments onto both synthetic zeolite and surfactant-modified zeolites (SMZ) showed that the SMZ-100 (zeolite modified with surfactant levels at 100% of CEC) was the most efficient modified zeolite for BTEX removal. Kinetics studies indicated that the multicomponent adsorption equilibrium was reached within 6 h and followed pseudo-second-order kinetics. The Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson and Temkin models were used to evaluate the BTEX adsorption capacity by SMZ-100. The Temkin model was found to be suitable for all BTEX compounds in a multicomponent system. Regeneration cycles of the modified zeolite were also performed, and the results showed that the adsorbent could be used efficiently in as many as four adsorption cycles, except for benzene.

Concepts: Chemistry, Benzene, Adsorption, Solutions, Toluene, Freundlich equation, Zeolite, Xylene

28

Successful watershed planning can be enhanced by stakeholder involvement in developing and implementing plans that reflect community goals and resource limitations. Community DECISIONS (Community Decision Support for Integrated, On-the-ground Nutrient Reduction Strategies) is a structured decision process to help stakeholders evaluate strategies that reduce watershed nutrient imbalances. A nutrient accounting algorithm and nutrient treatment database provide information on nutrient loadings and costs of alternative strategies to reduce loadings. Stakeholders were asked to formulate goals for the North Fork Shenandoah River Watershed in Virginia and select among strategies to achieve those goals. The Vector Analytic Hierarchy Process was used to rank strategies. Stakeholders preferred a Maximum strategy that included point source upgrades, riparian buffers, no-till corn silage, wheat cover, and bioretention filters in developed areas. Participants generally agreed that the process helped improve communication among stakeholders, was helpful for watershed planning, and should be used for TMDL (Total Maximum Daily Load) planning. Participants suggested more attention be paid to ensuring that all relevant issues are addressed and all information needed to make decisions is available. Watershed planning should provide stakeholders with clear scientific information about physical and socioeconomic processes. However, planning processes must give stakeholders adequate time to consider issues that may not have been addressed by existing scientific models and datasets.

Concepts: Decision making, Water pollution, Decision theory, Decision making software, Analytic Hierarchy Process, Analytical hierarchy, Plan, Analytic set

28

In this research, the capability of lateritic soil used as coagulant for the treatment of stabilized leachate from the Penang-Malaysia Landfill Site was investigated. The evaluation of lateritic soil coagulant in comparison with commercialized chemical coagulants, such as alum, was performed using conventional jar test experiments. The optimum pH and coagulant dosage were identified for the lateritic soil coagulant and the comparative alum coagulant. It was found that the application of lateritic soil coagulant was quite efficient in the removal of COD, color and ammoniacal-nitrogen content from the landfill leachate. The optimal pH value was 2.0, while 14 g/L of lateritic soil coagulant was sufficient in removing 65.7% COD, 81.8% color and 41.2% ammoniacal-nitrogen. Conversely, the optimal pH and coagulant dosage for the alum were pH 4.8 and 10 g/L respectively, where 85.4% COD, 96.4% color and 47.6% ammoniacal-nitrogen were removed from the same leachate sample. Additionally, the Sludge Volume Index (SVI) ratio of alum and lateritic soil coagulant was 53:1, which indicated that less sludge was produced and was an environmentally friendly product. Therefore, lateritic soil coagulant can be considered a viable alternative in the treatment of landfill leachate.

Concepts: Blood, Soil, PH, Anaerobic digestion, Optimization, Leachate, Landfill, Daily cover

28

One of the most commonly employed water conservation strategies is to restrict lawn watering to limited times on specified days. Water managers typically assume that limiting the frequency and duration of lawn watering will reduce water use. Consequently, the effectiveness of water restrictions is often evaluated based on observed compliance to the specified schedule, whether or not actual reductions in water use are achieved. This assessment approach is more practical than quantifying the reduction in water use brought about by restrictions because quantification of lawn water use is hampered by difficulties in disaggregating the various components of residential water use. Dual meters to separately meter the portion of public supply devoted to lawn water use are rare, and for households that withdraw water from private wells, canals, or ponds for lawn watering, there is no record of such water use at all. As a consequence of this gap in water use data, compliance to a prescribed frequency of watering is often equated with effectiveness. In this paper we develop an alternative metric for evaluating the effectiveness of water restrictions and present a case study in a suburban area in Southeast Florida that illustrates some of the challenges of quantifying lawn water use and explores some of the limitations of day of the week water restrictions as a conservation strategy.

Concepts: Scientific method, Wavelength, Case study, Indian Reductions, Water conservation, Metre, Grass, Metric system

28

This paper presents the effect of desliming on the short- and long-term strength, stability and rheological properties of cemented paste backfill (CPB) produced from two different mill tailings. A 28-day unconfined compressive strength (UCS) of ≥1.0 MPa and the maintenance of stability over 224 days of curing were selected as the design criteria for the evaluation of paste backfill performance. Desliming induced some changes in the physical, chemical, mineralogical and rheological properties of the tailings. CPB mixture of the deslimed tailings achieved the required consistency at a lower water to cement ratio. The short-term UCSs of CPB samples of the deslimed tailings were found to be 30-100% higher than those samples of the reference tailings at all the binder dosages and curing times. CPB samples of the deslimed tailings achieved the long-term stability at relatively low binder dosages (e.g. 5 wt% c.f. ≥6.1% for the reference tailings). It was also estimated that desliming could allow a 13.4-23.1% reduction in the binder consumption depending apparently on the inherent characteristics of the tailings. Over the curing period, generation of sulphate and acid by the oxidation of pyrite present in the tailings was also monitored to correlate with the strength losses observed in the long term. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry (MIP) analyses provided an insight into the microstructure of CPB and the formation of secondary mineral phases (i.e. gypsum) confirming the beneficial effect of desliming. These findings suggest that desliming can be suitably exploited for CPB of sulphide-rich mill tailings to improve the strength and stability particularly in the long term and to reduce binder consumption.

Concepts: Time, Electron, Mineral, Materials science, Term, Scanning electron microscope, Compressive strength, Concrete