SciCombinator

Discover the most talked about and latest scientific content & concepts.

Journal: Journal of endovascular therapy : an official journal of the International Society of Endovascular Specialists

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Purpose: To describe a bailout technique for in situ fenestration of an inadvertently covered internal iliac artery (IIA) associated with endovascular repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Technique: The procedure is demonstrated in a 76-year-old patient who underwent elective repair of a 5-cm infrarenal AAA using an Excluder endovascular graft 2 years following thoracic aortic stent-graft repair of a chronic type B aortic dissection. A completion angiogram demonstrated unintentional coverage of the left IIA. The iliac limb of the stent-graft was not able to be displaced away from the ostium, so to preserve IIA perfusion in a patient with prior thoracic aortic stent-grafting, a bailout technique was performed using an Outback re-entry device to successfully fenestrate the polytetrafluoroethylene graft material. An iCast balloon-expandable stent was placed across the fenestration creating a patent side branch to maintain patency. Six-year follow-up demonstrates a stable repair. Conclusion: In situ fenestration of a stent-graft overlying the internal iliac artery can be a useful bailout technique when other options are unsuccessful.

Concepts: Aortic aneurysm, Aneurysm, Aortic dissection, Aorta, External iliac artery, Abdominal aortic aneurysm, Internal iliac artery, Vascular surgery

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To compare success rates of a guidewire and microcatheter strategy vs the use of specialized crossing devices to traverse infrainguinal peripheral artery chronic total occlusions (CTOs).

Concepts: Input device

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To compare the total initial treatment costs for open surgery, endovascular revascularization, and primary major amputation within a single-payer healthcare system.

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To report the 1-year outcomes of a single-center, all-comers registry aimed to assess effectiveness and safety of endovascular revascularization for atherosclerotic erectile dysfunction (ED) in an unselected patient cohort.

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To compare the acute success and complication rates of distal radial (DR) vs proximal radial (PR) artery access for superficial femoral artery (SFA) interventions.

2

Purpose: To evaluate the midterm results of patients suffering from no-option chronic limb-threatening ischemia (CLTI) treated with a dedicated system for percutaneous deep venous arterialization (pDVA). Materials and Methods: Thirty-two consecutive CLTI patients (mean age 67±14 years; 20 men) treated with pDVA using the Limflow device at 4 centers between 11 July 2014 and 11 June 2018 were retrospectively analyzed. Of all patients, 21 (66%) had diabetes, 8 (25%) were on immunosuppression, 4 (16%) had dialysis-dependent renal failure, 9 (28%) had Rutherford category 6 ischemia, and 25 (78%) were deemed at high risk of amputation. The primary outcome was amputation-free survival (AFS) at 6 months. Secondary outcomes were wound healing, limb salvage, and survival at 6, 12, and 24 months. Results: Technical success was achieved in 31 patients (96.9%). The median follow-up was 34 months (range 16-63). At 6, 12, and 24 months, estimates were 83.9%, 71.0%, and 67.2% for AFS, 86.8%, 79.8% and 79.8% for limb salvage, and 36.6%, 68.2%, and 72.7% for complete wound healing, respectively. Median time to complete wound healing was 4.9 months (range 0.5-15). The DVA circuit occluded during follow-up in 21 patients; the median time to occlusion was 2.6 months. Reintervention for occlusion was performed in 17 patients: 16 because of unhealed wounds and 1 for a newly developed ulcer. Conclusion: This study represents the largest population of patients with no-option CLTI treated with pDVA using the LimFlow device with midterm results. In this complex group of patients, pDVA using the LimFlow device has been shown to be feasible, with a high technical success rate and AFS at 6 up to 24 months coupled with wound healing. In selected patients with no-option CLTI, pDVA could be a recommended treatment to prevent amputation and heal wounds.

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To evaluate if jugular vein flow restoration in various venographic defects indicative of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients can have positive effects on cerebral lesions identified using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

2

Purpose: To systematically review the literature and extract information on the definitions, prevalence, implications, and treatment of dissections after infrainguinal balloon angioplasty, with a goal of summarizing current data and identifying gaps in knowledge to help direct future research. Materials and Methods: A systematic review was performed according to the PRISMA guidelines. Medline (PubMed), Scopus, and Cochrane CENTRAL databases were reviewed for prospective and retrospective studies reporting dissection identification, characterization, incidence, severity, and/or outcomes after infrainguinal balloon angioplasty up to January 30, 2019. The electronic search resulted in 288 studies. From these, 153 full-text articles were assessed, and 51 published from 1964 to 2018 were selected as relevant to this systematic review. Because of the significant between-study differences in lesion characteristics, reporting methods, and lack of core laboratory adjudication, the findings were summarized from each study, but the results were not pooled. Results: The mechanism of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) consists of adventitial stretching, medial necrosis, and controlled dissection or plaque fracture. PTA-induced dissections can precipitate pathological high and low shear hemodynamic defects and have been implicated as a contributing factor in procedural complications as well as restenosis at the treatment site. The development of significant dissection after PTA often leads to the use of adjunctive therapies, including stent placement. Despite the ubiquitous nature of dissection after balloon angioplasty (incidence 7.4% to 84%), limited data are available to categorize dissections in the peripheral arteries and direct subsequent treatments to improve vessel patency. With the increased utilization of drug-coated balloon angioplasty, understanding the outcomes of postangioplasty dissection has become increasingly important, as the decision to treat dissections with additional strategies has therapeutic and economic implications. Conclusion: All post-PTA dissections in the femoropopliteal arteries may benefit from a treatment approach that ensures optimal hemodynamics with long-term durability in treated lesions. Further understanding the importance of postangioplasty dissections, along with the development of new technologies, will help optimize the patency of endovascular interventions.