SciCombinator

Discover the most talked about and latest scientific content & concepts.

Journal: Journal of bioscience and bioengineering

28

Carthamus yellow (CY) is the major component of the yellow pigments of Carthamus tinctorius L. CY has been extensively used as a natural color additive for food and cosmetics. Here, our results demonstrate that carthamus yellow reduced the activity of mushroom tyrosinase in a dose-dependent manner with a half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) value of approximately 1.01 ± 0.03 mg/mL. A kinetic study of carthamus yellow on tyrosinase exhibited a mode of competitive inhibition with a Ki of 0.607 mg/mL. Moreover, cell viability analysis indicated that carthamus yellow used at concentrations of 1.0-4.0 mg/mL had no cytotoxicity in B16F10 melanoma cells. Melanin content analysis showed that melanin production in B16F10 melanoma cells treated with 4 mg/mL carthamus yellow can decrease to 82.3 ± 0.4% of the levels of melanin production of untreated cells. Thus, carthamus yellow has the potential to become a useful skin-whitening agent in the future.

Concepts: Electrochemistry, Concentration, Melanoma, Melanin, Pigment, Melanocyte, Tyrosinase, Safflower

28

Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) remains a major cause of diarrheic disease in developing areas, for which there is no effective vaccine available. In this study, we genetically engineered a recombinant heat-stable enterotoxin (STa) coupled to the subunit B of heat-labile enterotoxin (LTB). This fusion protein, STa-LTB, possesses a single amino acid substitution at position 14 of STa. Our data demonstrates that the enterotoxicity of STa in STa-LTB was dramatically reduced. A gelatin nanovaccine candidate was prepared using the purified STa-LTB fusion protein characterized with an entrapment efficiency of 84.88 ± 6.37% and smooth spheres size ranges of 80-200 nm. Antigen-specific antibody responses against STa-LTB and STa in the sera and the intestinal mucus respectively were used to test the immunogenicity of the nanovaccine. This vaccine was further screened in mice by its ability to elicit neutralizing antibodies against STa and protect animals from the challenge with ETEC in mice. The STa-LTB nanoparticles delivered demonstrated a capacity to induce significantly higher and long-lasting antibody responses and increased immune protection against ETEC challenge relative to the control STa-LTB vaccine absorbed in conventional aluminum hydrate salt (p < 0.01). These results warrant the further studies of the development of a novel nanoparticulate vaccine as a broad-spectrum vaccine against ETEC infection.

Concepts: Immune system, Antibody, Protein, Bacteria, Immunology, Escherichia coli, Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, Heat-stable enterotoxin

28

We developed a rapid and simple method for evaluating the degradation of solid biodegradable plastics (BPs). Dye-containing BP films were used as substrates and the release of dye caused by the degradation of BPs was confirmed by a color change in the enzyme solution after a reaction time of 24 h.

Concepts: Enzyme, Catalysis, Starch, Plastic, Biodegradation, Recyclable materials, Bioplastic, Biodegradable plastic

28

In this study, tubular hydrogel structures were constructed via electrodeposition using alginate gels. Electrolysis of water in alginate solutions with calcium carbonate particles induced gel aggregation around Pt wire electrodes, forming tubular alginate gel structures. The simple method is a promising approach for construction of multi-layer tubular hydrogel structures for tissue engineering.

Concepts: Water, Calcium, Colloid, Calcium carbonate, Electrolysis, Calcite, Aragonite, Electrolysis of water

28

The present work deals with the improvement of multiple stress tolerance in a glucose-xylose co-fermenting hybrid yeast strain RPR39 by sequential mutagenesis using ethyl methane sulfonate, N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, near and far ultraviolet radiations. The mutants were evaluated for their tolerance to ethanol, temperature and fermentation inhibitors. Among these mutants, mutant RPRT90 exhibited highest tolerance to 10% initial ethanol concentration, 2 g L(-1) furfural and 8 g L(-1) acetic acid. The mutant also showed good growth at high temperature (39-40°C). A study on the combined effect of multiple stresses during fermentation of glucose-xylose mixture (3:1 ratio) was performed using mutant RPRT90. Under the combined effect of thermal (39°C) and inhibitor stress (0.25 g L(-1) vanillin, 0.5 g L(-1) furfural and 4 g L(-1) acetic acid), the mutant produced ethanol with a yield of 0.379 g g(-1), while under combined effect of ethanol (7% v/v) and inhibitor stress the ethanol yield obtained was 0.43 g g(-1). Further, under the synergistic effect of sugar (250 g L(-1)), thermal (39°C), ethanol (7% v/v) and inhibitors stress, the strain produced a maximum of 47.93 g L(-1) ethanol by utilizing 162.42 g L(-1) of glucose-xylose mixture giving an ethanol yield of 0.295 g g(-1) and productivity of 0.57 g L(-1) h(-1). Under same condition the fusant RPR39 produced a maximum of 30.0 g L(-1) ethanol giving a yield and productivity of 0.21 g g(-1) and 0.42 g L(-1) h(-1) respectively. The molecular characterization of mutant showed considerable difference in its genetic profile from hybrid RPR39. Thus, sequential mutagenesis was found to be effective to improve the stress tolerance properties in yeast.

Concepts: Oxygen, Carbon dioxide, Ethanol, Yeast, Acetic acid, Wine, Vinegar, Ethanol fuel

27

Mixotrophic growth of Chlorella minutissima with carbon supplements such as glucose, glycerol, succinate, molasses and press mud resulted in maximum biomass accumulation in glucose supplemented culture. Lipid content was maximum with molasses followed by press mud, fatty acid compositions of which also were best suited for biodiesel production.

Concepts: Fatty acid, Ethanol, Triglyceride, Fat, Lipid, Biochemistry, Eicosapentaenoic acid, Glycerol

27

This work is to explore the potential of producing biodiesel and valuable co-products from the biomass of Schizochytrium mangrovei PQ6 which was isolated from Phu Quoc Island, Kien Giang province, Vietnam. This microalga contains high lipid content (up to 70% of dry cell weight) and high level of total fatty acids, which is ideal for making biodiesel. The production of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) from this marine microalga resulted in a yield of 88% based on algal oil and 44% based on algal biomass. The process of separating the obtained FAME into a first fraction enriched with saturated FAME (SFAME) and a second fraction enriched with unsaturated FAME (UFAME) was then investigated to exploit the valuable co-products. The obtained results shown that the mass fraction of SFAME and UFAME were 70% and 30%, respectively. The UFAME fraction contains a high content of DHA (accounting for 69.000% of TFAs). The test results of the SFAME fraction indicated that specific gravity at 15°C, flash point, water and sediment, kinematic viscosity at 40°C, sulfated ash, sulfur, copper strip corrosion at 50°C, cetane number, carbon residue, iodine number, workmanship meet Vietnam Biodiesel B100 Standard. Moreover, the utilization of waste glycerol from biodiesel process as carbon source for the cultivation of the microalgae S. mangrovei PQ6 and Spirulina platensis was also investigated.

Concepts: Fatty acid, Fat, Lipid, Ester, Biofuel, Eicosapentaenoic acid, Glycerol, Biodiesel

27

The field of metabolomics continues to grow rapidly over the last decade and has been proven to be a powerful technology in predicting and explaining complex phenotypes in diverse biological systems. Metabolomics complements other omics, such as transcriptomics and proteomics and since it is a ‘downstream’ result of gene expression, changes in the metabolome is considered to best reflect the activities of the cell at a functional level. Thus far, metabolomics might be the sole technology capable of detecting complex, biologically essential changes. As one of the omics technology, metabolomics has exciting applications in varied fields, including medical science, synthetic biology, medicine, and predictive modeling of plant, animal and microbial systems. In addition, integrated applications with genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics provide greater understanding of global system biology. In this review, we discuss recent applications of metabolomics in microbiology, plant, animal, food, and medical science.

Concepts: DNA, Gene, Genetics, Evolution, Biology, Organism, Biotechnology, Systems biology

27

Active uptake of ferric iron in microorganisms is based on siderophores. During iron deficiency, Pseudomonas fluorescens synthesizes siderophores, called pyoverdine, which have a high affinity for ferric iron. Strategy I plants generally cannot synthesize pyoverdine or take up ferric iron. We assessed the effect of pyoverdine chelated to ferric iron on iron nutrition in Solanum lycopersicum. Weight and photosynthetic pigment concentrations in the plants supplemented with the pyoverdine and ferric iron were restored to the rates of plants supplemented with ferrous iron. Leaves and roots accumulated significant iron after pyoverdine and ferric iron supplementation than when supplemented with ferric iron alone. When leaves and roots were supplemented with pyoverdine and ferric iron, the SlFRO1 expression level was suppressed to 20% and 50% relative to those decreased with ferric iron alone, respectively. The level of SlIRT1 in roots supplemented with pyoverdine and ferric iron decreased to 50% compared with the level in roots supplemented with ferric iron alone. These results suggest that SlFRO1 and SlIRT1 expression levels were suppressed and that iron content was restored by pyoverdine and ferric iron supplementation. Thus, the downregulation may have occurred because of negative feedback on mRNA expression. Pyoverdine-mediated ferric iron uptake by tomato is suggested to be a useful strategy to increase iron uptake from the environment.

Concepts: Photosynthesis, Bacteria, Iron, Fruit, Tomato, Solanaceae, Solanum, Ferric

27

A novel bacterium was isolated from the soil of Ichalkaranji textile industrial area. Through 16S rRNA sequence matching and morphological observation it was identified as Lysinibacillus sp. RGS. This strain has ability to decolorize various industrial dyes among which, it showed complete decolorization and degradation of toxic sulfonated azo dye C.I. Remazol Red (at 30°C, pH 7.0, under static condition) with higher chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction (92%) within 6 h of incubation. Various parameters like agitation, pH, temperature and initial dye concentrations were optimized to develop faster decolorization process. The supplementation of cheap co-substrates (e.g., extracts of agricultural wastes) could enhance the decolorization performance of Lysinibacillus sp. RGS. Induction in oxidoreductive enzymes presumably indicates involvement of these enzymes in the decolorization/degradation process. Analytical studies of the extracted metabolites confirmed the significant degradation of Remazol Red into various metabolites. The phytotoxicity assay (with respect to plants Phaseolus mungo and Sorghum vulgare) revealed that the degradation of Remazol Red produced nontoxic metabolites. Finally Lysinibacillus sp. RGS was applied to decolorize mixture of dyes and actual industrial effluent showing 87% and 72% decolorization (in terms of decrease in ADMI value) with 69% and 62% COD reduction within 48 h and 96 h, respectively. The foregoing result increases the applicability of the strain for the treatment of industrial wastewaters containing dye pollutants.

Concepts: Enzyme, Ribosomal RNA, 16S ribosomal RNA, Toxicology, Dye, Azo compound, Pigments, Azo dyes