SciCombinator

Discover the most talked about and latest scientific content & concepts.

Journal: Joint, bone, spine : revue du rhumatisme

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In the majority of cases, Lyme disease responds well to antibiotic treatment. Nevertheless, some patients may suffer from chronic nonspecific symptoms such as musculoskeletal pain and fatigue, termed as a post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS). Proper understanding and management of PTLDS may prevent from the incorrect diagnosis of patients with autoimmune, neuromuscular or other somatic disorders, where identical symptoms are equally prevalent. We report a 37-year-old female with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who was repeatedly misdiagnosed for a chronic Lyme disease and treated with tetracycline antibiotics before she developed an acute exacerbation of SLE and finally died due to multi-organ failure. The internet encourages patients to ask physicians for serology testing for Lyme disease and to demand further antibiotic treatment. However, there is clear evidence that positive serology does not indicate infection with B.burgdorferi and most importantly, antibiotic therapy for PTLDS is potentially harmful for patients. It is crucial to follow the recent guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease and PTLDS to avoid the repetition of antibiotic regimens and misdiagnosing patients.

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Cow’s milk is often severely criticized as a cause of multiple health problems, including an increased risk of fractures. A close look at the scientific literature shows a striking contradiction. On the one hand, experimental studies of surrogate markers (e.g., bone turnover markers and bone mineral density [BMD]) usually indicate benefits from drinking cow’s milk. On the other, the findings from epidemiological studies are conflicting and disconcerting. In all age groups, including children and postmenopausal women, consuming cow’s milk, powdered milk supplements, or whey protein is associated with a slower bone turnover and unchanged or higher BMD values. These benefits are particularly marked in populations where calcium deficiency is prevalent, for instance in Asian countries. No interventional studies have addressed the fracture risk potentially associated with drinking cow’s milk. The only available data come from epidemiological observational studies, whose results are conflicting, with a lower fracture risk in some cases and no difference or a higher risk in others. Several hypotheses have been offered to explain these findings, such as a deleterious effect of D-galactose, lactose intolerance, and acid overload. Epidemiological studies face many obstacles when seeking to detect effects of a single food, particularly the multiplicity of interactions among foods. Furthermore, reliable dietary intake data must be collected over prolonged periods, often long before the occurrence of a fracture, and defective recall may therefore introduce a major yet often unrecognized bias, particularly in populations where calcium deficiency is uncommon. To date, there is no conclusive evidence that we should modify our currently high level of consumption of cow’s milk.

Concepts: Scientific method, Osteoporosis, Bone, Epidemiology, Milk, Calcium, Lactose intolerance, Cheese

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Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common chronic inflammatory joint disease and is associated with an excess risk of cardiovascular disease. For the general population, the World Health Organization has issued detailed recommendations on the type of physical activity appropriate for decreasing the cardiovascular risk. The objective of this work is to review available data on the effects of physical activity in patients with RA.

Concepts: Medicine, Cardiovascular disease, Rheumatoid arthritis, Rheumatology, Osteoarthritis, Arthritis, World Health Organization, Psoriatic arthritis

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Drug-induced tendon toxicity is rare but often underestimated. To date, four main drug classes have been incriminated in tendinopathies. Quinolones and long-term glucocorticoids are the most widely known, but statins and aromatase inhibitors can also induce tendon damage. The specific pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for drug-induced tendinopathies remain unknown. Proven risk factors have been identified, such as age older than 60years, pre-existing tendinopathy, and potentiation of toxic effects when several drug classes are used in combination. Mean time to symptom onset varies from a few days with quinolones to several months with statins and several years for long-term glucocorticoid therapy. The most common sites of involvement are the lower limb tendons, most notably the body of the Achilles tendon. The first part of this review discusses tendon anatomy and the pathophysiology and radiological manifestations of tendinopathies. The second part provides details on the main characteristics of each of the drugs classes associated with tendon toxicity.

Concepts: Drug, Glucocorticoid, Drugs, Drug addiction, Toxicity, Tendon, Achilles tendon, Tendons

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To identify, by a systematic literature review, predictors of clinical response to methotrexate treatment in rheumatoid arthritis patients, which would facilitate personalised treatment.

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To evaluate the prevalence of biological abnormalities leading to secondary osteoporosis in recently fractured patients.

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The primary objective was to evaluate the correlation between 5-year radiographic structural disease progression and early clinical remission in recent-onset rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The secondary objective was to assess the correlation between erosion development in joints free of damage at baseline and early clinical remission.

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Temporal and geographic variations in knee osteoarthritis (OA) incidence occur worldwide. Regional variations also exist for socioeconomic status. We analyzed the association between socioeconomic deprivation (SED) and knee replacement (KR) incidence and assessed the proportion of KR associated with affluence.

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A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted to investigate the associations of hyperuricemia, gout, and uric acid (UA)-lowering therapy with the risk of fractures.

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Several conditions have clinical and laboratory features that can mimic those present in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). Some of these “SLE mimickers” are very common, such as rosacea which can be mistaken for the butterfly rash, while others such as Kikuchi disease, type-1 interferonopathies, Castleman’s disease, prolidase deficiency, angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma, Evans' syndrome in the context of primary immune deficiencies and the autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome are exceptionally uncommon. A proper diagnosis of SLE must therefore be based upon a complete medical history as well as on the adequate constellation of clinical or laboratory findings. While there is no single test that determines whether a patient has lupus or not, the search for auto-antibodies towards nuclear antigens is a key step in the diagnosis strategy, keeping in mind that ANAs are not specific for SLE. In case of persistent doubt, patients should be referred to reference centers with experience in the management of the disease.