SciCombinator

Discover the most talked about and latest scientific content & concepts.

Journal: Clinical endoscopy

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Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is the infusion of liquid filtrate feces from a healthy donor into the gut of a recipient to cure a specific disease. A fecal suspension can be administered by nasogastric or nasoduodenal tube, colonoscope, enema, or capsule. The high success rate and safety in the short term reported for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection has elevated FMT as an emerging treatment for a wide range of disorders, including Parkinson’s disease, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, myoclonus dystopia, multiple sclerosis, obesity, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and autism. There are many unanswered questions regarding FMT, including donor selection and screening, standardized protocols, long-term safety, and regulatory issues. This article reviews the efficacy and safety of FMT used in treating a variety of diseases, methodology, criteria for donor selection and screening, and various concerns regarding FMT.

Concepts: Cancer, Gut flora, Nutrition, Infection, Obesity, Constipation, Clostridium difficile, Chronic fatigue syndrome

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With the notable exceptions of dementia, stroke, and motor neuron disease, relatively little is known about the safety and utility of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube insertion in patients with neurodegenerative disease. We aimed to determine the safety and utility of PEG feeding in the context of neurodegenerative disease and to complete a literature review in order to identify whether particular factors need to be considered to improve safety and outcome.

Concepts: Stroke, Neurology, Feeding tube, Esophagogastroduodenoscopy, Motor neuron, Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, Gastrostomy, Enteral feeding

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The use of moderate to deep sedation for gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures has increased in Europe considerably. Because this level of sedation is a risky medical procedure, a number of international guidelines have been developed. This survey aims to review if, and if so which, quality aspects have been included in new sedation practices when compared to traditional uncontrolled sedation practices.

Concepts: Procedural sedation, Sedation, Endoscopy

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Colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is now a well-established endoscopic treatment for early-stage colorectal neoplasms, especially in Asian countries, including Japan. Despite the spread of colorectal ESD, there are still situations in which achieving successful submucosal dissection is difficult. Various novel techniques and devices have been developed to overcome these difficulties, and past reports have shown that some of these strategies can be applied to colorectal ESD. We review several recent developments in the field. The techniques reviewed include the pocket creation method and traction methods and the devices reviewed include the overtube with balloon and electrosurgical knives with water-jet function. These improved techniques and devices can facilitate safer, more reliable ESDs and expand its applicability and acceptability all over the world.

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Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) are relatively rare; however, the incidence has increased over the last few decades. They are classified as functional or non-functional tumors according to the presence of associated clinical symptoms. The majority are non-functional tumors. For classification and staging, the World Health Organization 2010 classification system is the most commonly accepted. Chromogranin A is the most sensitive marker but has insufficient specificity. In general, PNETs are hypervascular tumors, and multiphasic contrast-enhanced computed tomography is considered the first choice for imaging study. Multiphasic magnetic resonance imaging can detect PNETs smaller than 2 cm and small liver metastasis compared with other modalities. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy is often used in cases where functional PNETs are suspected. Positron emission tomography (PET) scan with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose cannot visualize PNETs, but PET with 68-Ga DOTATATE can. Endoscopic ultrasonography can characterize smaller PNETs using contrast and confirm histology through fine needle aspiration or biopsy. In this article, we review the characteristics of grading systems and diagnostic modalities commonly used for PNETs.

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The incidence of rectal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) has increased by almost ten-fold over the past 30 years. There has been a heightened awareness of the malignant potential of rectal NETs. Fortunately, many rectal NETs are discovered at earlier stages due to colon cancer screening programs. Endoscopic ultrasound is useful in assessing both residual tumor burden after retrospective diagnosis and tumor characteristics to help guide subsequent management. Current guidelines suggest endoscopic resection of rectal NETs ≤10 mm as a safe therapeutic option given their low risk of metastasis. Although a number of endoscopic interventions exist, the best technique for resection has not been identified. Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has high complete and en-bloc resection rates, but also an increased risk of complications including perforation. In addition, ESD is only performed at tertiary centers by experienced advanced endoscopists. Endoscopic mucosal resection has been shown to have variable complete resection rates, but modifications to the technique such as the addition of band ligation have improved outcomes. Prospective studies are needed to further compare the available endoscopic interventions, and to elucidate the most appropriate course of management of rectal NETs.

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Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) are increasingly being detected, though usually as incidental findings. Majority of the PNETs are non-functional and surgical resection is the standard of care for most of them. However, in patients with small PNETs localized within the pancreas, who are unfit or unwilling for surgery, alternate methods of treatment are needed. Direct methods of ablation of PNETs, using either ethanol injection or radiofrequency ablation (RFA), are emerging as effective methods. The limited literature available as case reports or case series on endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided local ablation using either ethanol or RFA has demonstrated safety and efficacy along with short- to medium-term sustained relief. Long-term benefits with these local ablative therapies are awaited. Comparative studies are needed to show which of these two competing technologies is superior. Finally, comparative trials of EUS-guided ablation with surgical resection in terms of efficacy and safety will ensure their place in the management algorithm.

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Upper gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are rare tumors which are increasingly recognised by practising endoscopists. After confirmation by endoscopic biopsies of these focal lesions, many questions may arise. As NETs are less frequently encountered compared to other malignancies or gastrointestinal pathology, many endoscopists may not fully understand the natural history, diagnosis and management of these tumors. In this review, we aim to update the practising endoscopist on the key clinical features and management of patients with upper gastrointestinal NET.

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The gold standard for treatment of acute cholecystitis is laparoscopic cholecystectomy. However, cholecystectomy is often not suitable for surgically unfit patients who are too frail due to various co-morbidities. As such, several less invasive endoscopic treatment modalities have been developed to control sepsis, either as a definitive treatment or as a temporizing modality until the patient is stable enough to undergo cholecystectomy at a later stage. Recent developments in endoscopic ultrasound-guided gallbladder drainage (EUS-GBD) with endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-specific stents having lumen-apposing properties have demonstrated potential as a definitive treatment modality. Furthermore, advanced gallbladder procedures can be performed using the stents as a portal. With similar effectiveness as percutaneous transhepatic cholecystostomy and lower rates of adverse events reported in some studies, EUS-GBD has opened exciting possibilities in becoming the next best alternative in treating acute cholecystitis in surgically unfit patients. The aim of this review article is to provide a summary of the various methods of gallbladder drainage (GBD) with particular focus on EUS-GBD and the many new prospects it allows.

Concepts: Laparoscopic surgery, Cholecystectomy, Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography

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Esophagogastroduodenoscopy for cancer screening was performed in a 55-year-old woman as part of a health screening program, and revealed a depressed lesion approximately 20 mm in diameter in the lesser curvature of the mid-gastric body. Several biopsy specimens were collected as the lesion resembled early gastric cancer; however, histopathologic evaluation revealed chronic active gastritis with an ulcer and amorphous eosinophilic material deposition. Congo red staining identified amyloid proteins, and apple-green birefringence was shown using polarized light microscopy. Immunohistochemical staining revealed the presence of kappa and lambda chain-positive plasma cells. There was no evidence of underlying plasma cell dyscrasia or amyloid deposition in other segments of the gastrointestinal tract. Echocardiography and computed tomography of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis did not show any significant findings. Thus, the patient was diagnosed with localized gastric amyloidosis with kappa and lambda light chain coexpression.

Concepts: Anatomical pathology, Histology, Amyloid, Stomach, Amyloidosis, Abdomen, Congo red, Birefringence