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Journal: Clinical and experimental emergency medicine

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To test the hypothesis that the quick Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment (qSOFA) score, derived from vital signs taken during triage and recommended by current sepsis guidelines for screening patients with infections for organ dysfunction, is not sensitive enough to predict the risk of mortality in emergency department (ED) sepsis patients.

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The use of computed tomography (CT) in pediatric patients has decreased since the association between radiation and cancer risk has been reported. However, in adolescent patients being treated as adult patients, there has been a high incidence of CT use in emergency departments (EDs). Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the CT use in adolescent patients with complaints of headache or abdominal pain in the general and pediatric EDs of the same hospital.

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Despite increased survival in patients with cardiac arrest, it remains difficult to determine patient prognosis at the early stage. This study evaluated the prognosis of cardiac arrest patients using brain injury, inflammation, cardiovascular ischemic events, and coagulation/fibrinolysis markers collected 24, 48, and 72 hours after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC).

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Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a major cause of sepsis, and sepsis-related acute organ dysfunction affects patient mortality. Although the quick Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (qSOFA) is a new screening tool for patients with suspected infection, its predictive value for the mortality of patients with CAP has not been validated. Lactate concentration is a valuable biomarker for critically ill patients. Thus, we investigated the predictive value of qSOFA with lactate concentration for in-hospital mortality in patients with CAP in the emergency department (ED).

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To investigate the epidemiology of sepsis in Korea and identify risk factors for death in sepsis.

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We evaluated the effect of rapid influenza diagnostic tests (RIDTs) on patient management in an emergency department for 3 years after 2009, and also identified factors associated with the choice of treatment for patients with influenza-like illnesses.

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Cerebral hemodynamic and metabolic changes may occur during the rewarming phase of targeted temperature management in post cardiac arrest patients. Yet, studies on different rewarming rates and patient outcomes are limited. This study aimed to investigate post cardiac arrest patients who were rewarmed with different rewarming rates after 24 hours of hypothermia and the association of these rates to the neurologic outcomes.

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A 34-year-old male was brought to the hospital with a chest gunshot wound. Pulseless upon arrival, blood pressure was absent for 10 minutes. A thoracotomy resulted in return of spontaneous circulation. On hospital day 5, with brainstem reflexes present, he was unresponsive to call or pain, exhibited generalized hyperreflexia and bilateral Babinskys. Median nerve somatosensory evoked potentials (mSSEPs) and brainstem auditory evoked potentials were obtained. International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology recommendations for mSSEPs and brainstem auditory evoked potentials were followed. Despite absence of the N20 responses from cortical mSSEPs no withdrawal from care was agreed upon. After awaking on day 7, mSSEPs were repeated and present. The patient survived and was discharged with minor deficits. Bilateral absence of N20 responses from mSSEPs performed beyond 48 hours after resuscitation from cardiac arrest is highly associated with bad neurological outcomes. However, variation due to hypothermia, noisy signals, medications, and brain hypo-perfusion must be taken into account.

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This study was conducted to determine why rescuers could maintain adequate chest compression depth for longer periods during conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

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Perihepatic capsulitis is associated with various diseases, such as Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, perforated cholecystitis, perforated hepatic abscess, and tuberculous peritonitis. Miliary tuberculosis is present in about 2% of all reported cases of tuberculosis and is characterized by the widespread millet-like hematogenous dissemination of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We describe a 24-year-old virgin patient presenting with right upper quadrant and costovertebral angle pain. Diffuse perihepatic capsular enhancement was observed in abdominal computed tomography scans. Chest radiography showed miliary tuberculosis, and a polymerase chain reaction hybridization assay of sputum revealed the presence of M. tuberculosis. Symptoms improved after administering anti-tuberculosis medications. This report describes a rare case of miliary tuberculosis accompanying perihepatitis.