SciCombinator

Discover the most talked about and latest scientific content & concepts.

Journal: American journal of public health

1866

To understand how Twitter bots and trolls (“bots”) promote online health content.

403

To explore whether improvements in psychological well-being occur after increases in fruit and vegetable consumption.

Concepts: Pea, Fruit, Tomato, Vegetable, Eggplant, Vegetarian cuisine, Cucumber

342

We examined whether kindergarten teachers' ratings of children’s prosocial skills, an indicator of noncognitive ability at school entry, predict key adolescent and adult outcomes. Our goal was to determine unique associations over and above other important child, family, and contextual characteristics.

Concepts: Health care, Public health, Health, Childhood

328

328

To describe trends in benzodiazepine prescriptions and overdose mortality involving benzodiazepines among US adults.

Concepts: United States, Poverty in the United States, U.S. state, Benzodiazepine, Barbiturate, Benzodiazepine overdose

276

To assess the association between medical marijuana laws (MMLs) and the odds of a positive opioid test, an indicator for prior use.

Concepts: Cannabis, Psychoactive drug, Recreational drug use, Legality of cannabis by country

261

To explore the effect of Medicaid expansion on US infant mortality rate.

Concepts: Infant, United States, Infant mortality, Perinatal mortality

259

242

To assess the prevalence of abortion among population groups and changes in rates between 2008 and 2014.

238

Four assumptions frequently arise in the aftermath of mass shootings in the United States: (1) that mental illness causes gun violence, (2) that psychiatric diagnosis can predict gun crime, (3) that shootings represent the deranged acts of mentally ill loners, and (4) that gun control “won’t prevent” another Newtown (Connecticut school mass shooting). Each of these statements is certainly true in particular instances. Yet, as we show, notions of mental illness that emerge in relation to mass shootings frequently reflect larger cultural stereotypes and anxieties about matters such as race/ethnicity, social class, and politics. These issues become obscured when mass shootings come to stand in for all gun crime, and when “mentally ill” ceases to be a medical designation and becomes a sign of violent threat. (Am J Public Health. Published online ahead of print December 12, 2014: e1-e10. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2014.302242).

Concepts: Health care, Mental health, Sociology, Mental disorder, Violent crime, Psychiatry, Mental illness, Insanity defense