SciCombinator

Discover the most talked about and latest scientific content & concepts.

Concept: Vitamin A

167

Vitamin A or retinol is arguably the most multifunctional vitamin in the human body as it is essential from embryogenesis to adulthood. The pleiotropic effects of vitamin A are exerted mainly by one active metabolite, all-trans retinoic acid (atRA), which regulates the expression of a battery of target genes through several families of nuclear receptors (RARs, RXRs and PPARβ/δ), polymorphic retinoic acid (RA) response elements and multiple coregulators. It also involves extra nuclear and non-transcriptional effects such as the activation of kinase cascades, which are integrated in the nucleus via the phosphorylation of several actors of RA signaling. However, vitamin A itself proved recently to be active and RARs to be present in the cytosol to regulate translation and cell plasticity. All these new concepts expand the scope of the biologic functions of vitamin A and RA.

Concepts: Cell nucleus, Cell, Signal transduction, Retinol, Vitamin A, Retinoic acid, Tretinoin, Retinoid

149

Cobalamin/Vitamin B12 (Cbl) is an essential vitamin, supplied mainly as hydroxocobalamin (OHCbl) by animal products, including cows' milk. Cyanocobalamin (CNCbl) is the usual form in vitamin pills. The aim was to explore absorption and tissue accumulation of two Cbl forms, administered alone or bound to milk protein.

Concepts: Nutrition, Milk, Vitamin B12, Vitamin A, B vitamins, Cyanocobalamin, Hydroxocobalamin, Vitamer

148

Vitamin A supplementation (VAS) programs targeted at children aged 6-59 months are implemented in many countries. By improving immune function, vitamin A (VA) reduces mortality associated with measles, diarrhea, and other illnesses. There is currently a debate regarding the relevance of VAS, but amidst the debate, researchers acknowledge that the majority of nationally-representative data on VA status is outdated. To address this data gap and contribute to the debate, we examined data from 82 countries implementing VAS programs, identified other VA programs, and assessed the recentness of national VA deficiency (VAD) data. We found that two-thirds of the countries explored either have no VAD data or data that were >10 years old (i.e., measured before 2006), which included twenty countries with VAS coverage ≥70%. Fifty-one VAS programs were implemented in parallel with at least one other VA intervention, and of these, 27 countries either had no VAD data or data collected in 2005 or earlier. To fill these gaps in VAD data, countries implementing VAS and other VA interventions should measure VA status in children at least every 10 years. At the same time, the coverage of VA interventions can also be measured. We identified three countries that have scaled down VAS, but given the lack of VA deficiency data, this would be a premature undertaking in most countries without appropriate status assessment. While the global debate about VAS is important, more attention should be directed towards individual countries where programmatic decisions are made.

Concepts: Immune system, Measurement, Vitamin, Vitamin C, Implementation, Intervention, Vitamin A, Internet Explorer

139

To evaluate the vitamin A status in serum and colostrum of postpartum women with different socioeconomic status, comparing the colostrum retinol supply with the vitamin A requirement of the newborn.

Concepts: Childbirth, Milk, Fat, Vitamin, Vitamins, Vitamin A, Requirement

69

Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is the third most widely consumed plant food by humans. Its tubers are rich in starch and vitamin C, but have low or null levels of essential nutrients such as provitamin A and vitamin E. Transformation of potato with a bacterial mini-pathway for β-carotene in a tuber-specific manner results in a “golden” potato (GP) tuber phenotype resulting from accumulation of provitamin A carotenoids (α- and β-carotene) and xanthophylls. Here, we investigated the bioaccessibility of carotenoids and vitamin E as α-tocopherol (αTC) in boiled wild type and golden tubers using in vitro digestion. Golden tubers contained up to 91 μg provitamin A carotenes (PAC)/g D, increased levels of xanthophylls, phytoene and phytofluene, as well as up to 78 μg vitamin E/g DW. Cubes from wild type and GP tubers were boiled and subjected to simulated digestion to estimate bioaccessibility of carotenoids and αTC. Retention in boiled GPs exceeded 80% for β-carotene (βC), α-carotene (αC), lutein, phytoene ± and αTC, but less than 50% for phytofluene. The efficiency of partitioning of total βC, αC, E-lutein, phytoene, phytofluene and αTC in the mixed micelle fraction during small intestinal digestion was influenced by genotype, tuber content and hydrophobicity. Apical uptake of the compounds that partitioned in mixed micelles by monolayers of human intestinal Caco-2 cells during incubation for 4h was 14-20% for provitamin A and xanthophylls, 43-45% for phytoene, 23-27% for phytofluene, and 53% for αTC. These results suggest that a 150 g serving of boiled golden potatoes has the potential to contribute 42% and 23% of the daily requirement of retinol activity equivalents (RAE), as well as 34 and 17% of the daily vitamin E requirement for children and women of reproductive age, respectively.

Concepts: Antioxidant, Vitamin, Carotenoid, Vitamin C, Solanum, Potato, Carotene, Vitamin A

49

Dietary supplements (DS) are extensively consumed worldwide despite unproven efficacy. The true incidence of DS-induced liver injury (DSILI) is unknown but is probably under-diagnosed due to the general belief of safety of these products. Reported cases of herbals and DS-induced liver injury are increasing worldwide. The aim of this manuscript is to report a tabular listing with a description of DS associated with hepatotoxicity as well as review the phenotype and severity of DSILI. Natural remedies related to hepatotoxicity can be divided into herbal product-induced liver injury and DS-induced liver injury. In this article, we describe different DS associated with liver injury, some of them manufactured DS containing several ingredients (Herbalife™ products, Hydroxycut™, LipoKinetix™, UCP-1 and OxyELITE™) while others have a single ingredient (green tea extract, linoleic acid, usnic acid, 1,3-Dimethylamylamine, vitamin A, Garcinia cambogia and ma huang). Additional DS containing some of the aforementioned ingredients implicated in liver injury are also covered. We have also included illicit androgenic anabolic steroids for bodybuilding in this work, as they are frequently sold under the denomination of DS despite being conventional drugs.

Concepts: Vitamin, Essential nutrient, Testosterone, Green tea, Vitamin A, Anabolic steroid, Hepatotoxicity, Garcinia

47

The unified global efforts to mitigate the high burden of vitamin and mineral deficiency, known as hidden hunger, in populations around the world are crucial to the achievement of most of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). We developed indices and maps of global hidden hunger to help prioritize program assistance, and to serve as an evidence-based global advocacy tool. Two types of hidden hunger indices and maps were created based on i) national prevalence data on stunting, anemia due to iron deficiency, and low serum retinol levels among preschool-aged children in 149 countries; and ii) estimates of Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) attributed to micronutrient deficiencies in 136 countries. A number of countries in sub-Saharan Africa, as well as India and Afghanistan, had an alarmingly high level of hidden hunger, with stunting, iron deficiency anemia, and vitamin A deficiency all being highly prevalent. The total DALY rates per 100,000 population, attributed to micronutrient deficiencies, were generally the highest in sub-Saharan African countries. In 36 countries, home to 90% of the world’s stunted children, deficiencies of micronutrients were responsible for 1.5-12% of the total DALYs. The pattern and magnitude of iodine deficiency did not conform to that of other micronutrients. The greatest proportions of children with iodine deficiency were in the Eastern Mediterranean (46.6%), European (44.2%), and African (40.4%) regions. The current indices and maps provide crucial data to optimize the prioritization of program assistance addressing global multiple micronutrient deficiencies. Moreover, the indices and maps serve as a useful advocacy tool in the call for increased commitments to scale up effective nutrition interventions.

Concepts: Malaria, Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, North Africa, Iron deficiency anemia, Malnutrition, Vitamin A, Millennium Development Goals

33

The major cow’s milk allergen Bos d 5 belongs to the lipocalin protein family, with an intramolecular pocket for hydrophobic ligands. We investigated whether Bos d 5 when loaded with the active vitamin A metabolite retinoic acid (RA), would elicit differential immune responses compared to the unloaded state. By in silico docking an affinity energy of -7.8 kcal/mol was calculated for RA into Bos d 5. Loading of RA to Bos d 5 could be achieved in vitro, as demonstrated by ANS displacement assay, but had no effect on serum IgE binding in tolerant or challenge-positive milk allergic children. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that RA binds to the immunodominant T-cell epitope region of Bos d 5. In accordance, Bos d 5 significantly suppressed the CD3+ CD4+ cell numbers, proliferative response and IL-10, IL-13 and IFN-γ secretion from stimulated human PBMCs only when complexed with RA. This phenomenon was neither associated with apoptosis of T-cells nor with the activation of Foxp3+ T-cells, but correlated likely with enhanced stability to lysosomal digestion due to a predicted overlap of Cathepsin S cleavage sites with the RA binding site. Taken together, proper loading of Bos d 5 with RA may suppress its immunogenicity and prevent its allergenicity.

Concepts: Immune system, Protein, Cell, Asthma, Immunology, B cell, T helper cell, Vitamin A

28

The objectives of the present study were to investigate the effects of acute exposure to PBDEs on retinoid signaling in fish. Zebrafish embryos (2h post-fertilization, hpf) were exposed to DE-71 (0, 31.0, 68.7, and 227.6μg/L) until 120hpf. Retinoid profiles showed the content of retinal and retinoic acid was reduced significantly. While a significant up-regulation was observed in the transcription of retinal dehydrogenase (raldh2), the transcription of retinol binding protein (rbp1a), retinol dehydrogenase (rdh1), cellular retinoic acid binding protein (crabp1a and crabp2a) and retinoic acid receptor subunit (raraa) were down-regulated significantly, indicating disruption of retinoid signaling. However, the transcriptions of five opsin genes (zfrho, zfuv, zfred, zfblue, and zfgr1) were up-regulated. Furthermore, whole mount immunostaining and western blotting demonstrated increased rhodopsin protein expression in the exposure groups. Overall, the results indicated that acute exposure to PBDEs could disturb retinoid signaling and may impact on eye development of zebrafish larvae.

Concepts: Protein, Gene, Molecular biology, Retinol, Vitamin A, Retinal, Retinoic acid receptor, Retinoic acid

28

OBJECTIVE: Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is a major public health problem with no effective treatment available other than surgery. We previously showed that mature heart valves calcify in response to retinoic acid (RA) treatment through downregulation of the SRY transcription factor Sox9. In this study, we investigated the effects of excess vitamin A and its metabolite RA on heart valve structure and function in vivo and examined the molecular mechanisms of RA signaling during the calcification process in vitro. METHODS AND RESULTS: Using a combination of approaches, we defined calcific aortic valve disease pathogenesis in mice fed 200 IU/g and 20 IU/g of retinyl palmitate for 12 months at molecular, cellular, and functional levels. We show that mice fed excess vitamin A develop aortic valve stenosis and leaflet calcification associated with increased expression of osteogenic genes and decreased expression of cartilaginous markers. Using a pharmacological approach, we show that RA-mediated Sox9 repression and calcification is regulated by classical RA signaling and requires both RA and retinoid X receptors. CONCLUSIONS: Our studies demonstrate that excess vitamin A dietary intake promotes heart valve calcification in vivo. Therefore suggesting that hypervitaminosis A could serve as a new risk factor of calcific aortic valve disease in the human population.

Concepts: Gene, In vitro, Aortic valve, Retinol, Vitamin A, Valvular heart disease, Valves, Aortic valve stenosis