SciCombinator

Discover the most talked about and latest scientific content & concepts.

Concept: Tricyclic antidepressant

198

Hypothesised associations between in utero exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and congenital anomalies, particularly congenital heart defects (CHD), remain controversial. We investigated the putative teratogenicity of SSRI prescription in the 91 days either side of first day of last menstrual period (LMP).

Concepts: Serotonin, Fluvoxamine, Antidepressant, Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, Sertraline, Tricyclic antidepressant, Reuptake inhibitor, Fluoxetine

185

To estimate the association between prenatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and motor development in children considering the effect of maternal symptoms of anxiety and depression before, during and after pregnancy.

Concepts: Serotonin, Antidepressant, Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, Major depressive disorder, Sertraline, Tricyclic antidepressant, Reuptake inhibitor, Fluoxetine

172

To investigate the proposed synergistic teratogenic effect of use of selective serotonin receptor inhibitors (SSRI) together with sedatives or hypnotics, primarily benzodiazepines, during pregnancy.

Concepts: Developmental biology, Serotonin, Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, Congenital disorder, Tricyclic antidepressant, Reuptake inhibitor, Congenital disorders, Congenital

172

Antidepressant drugs such as selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) remediate negative biases in emotional processing in depressed patients in both behavioural and neural outcome measures. However, it is not clear if these effects occur before, or as a consequence of, changes in clinical state. Method In the present study, we investigated the effects of short-term SSRI treatment in depressed patients on the neural response to fearful faces prior to clinical improvement in mood. Altogether, 42 unmedicated depressed patients received SSRI treatment (10 mg escitalopram daily) or placebo in a randomised, parallel-group design. The neural response to fearful and happy faces was measured on day 7 of treatment using functional magnetic resonance imaging. A group of healthy controls was imaged in the same way.

Concepts: Serotonin, Antidepressant, Citalopram, Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, Major depressive disorder, Sertraline, Tricyclic antidepressant, Fluoxetine

162

Although selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely prescribed, associations with violence are uncertain.

Concepts: Serotonin, Crime, Violent crime, Violence, Antidepressant, Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, Tricyclic antidepressant, Reuptake inhibitor

156

To follow up on previously reported associations between periconceptional use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and specific birth defects using an expanded dataset from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study.

Concepts: Serotonin, Antidepressant, Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, Major depressive disorder, Sertraline, Tricyclic antidepressant, Reuptake inhibitor, Fluoxetine

39

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most commonly used class of antidepressant drugs, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which their therapeutic action is initiated are poorly understood. Here we show that serotonin 5-HT1B receptors in cholecystokinin (CCK) inhibitory interneurons of the mammalian dentate gyrus (DG) initiate the therapeutic response to antidepressants. In these neurons, 5-HT1B receptors are expressed presynaptically, and their activation inhibits GABA release. Inhibition of GABA release from CCK neurons disinhibits parvalbumin (PV) interneurons and, as a consequence, reduces the neuronal activity of the granule cells. Finally, inhibition of CCK neurons mimics the antidepressant behavioral effects of SSRIs, suggesting that these cells may represent a novel cellular target for the development of fast-acting antidepressant drugs.

Concepts: Neurogenesis, Granule cell, Serotonin, Antidepressant, Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, Sertraline, Tricyclic antidepressant, Fluoxetine

38

IMPORTANCE Fibromyalgia is present in as much as 2% to 8% of the population, is characterized by widespread pain, and is often accompanied by fatigue, memory problems, and sleep disturbances. OBJECTIVE To review the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of fibromyalgia. EVIDENCE REVIEW The medical literature on fibromyalgia was reviewed from 1955 to March 2014 via MEDLINE and the Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials, with an emphasis on meta-analyses and contemporary evidence-based treatment guidelines. Treatment recommendations are based on the most recent evidence-based guidelines from the Canadian Pain Society and graded from 1 to 5 based on the level of available evidence. FINDINGS Numerous treatments are available for managing fibromyalgia that are supported by high-quality evidence. These include nonpharmacological therapies (education, exercise, cognitive behavioral therapy) and pharmacological therapies (tricyclics, serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, and gabapentinoids). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Fibromyalgia and other “centralized” pain states are much better understood now than ever before. Fibromyalgia may be considered as a discrete diagnosis or as a constellation of symptoms characterized by central nervous system pain amplification with concomitant fatigue, memory problems, and sleep and mood disturbances. Effective treatment for fibromyalgia is now possible.

Concepts: Nervous system, Psychology, The Canon of Medicine, Evidence-based medicine, Neuroscience, Antidepressant, Dopamine, Tricyclic antidepressant

36

The role of serotonin in depression and antidepressant treatment remains unresolved despite decades of research. In this paper, we make three major claims. First, serotonin transmission is elevated in multiple depressive phenotypes, including melancholia, a subtype associated with sustained cognition. The primary challenge to this first claim is that the direct pharmacological effect of most symptom-reducing medications, such as the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), is to increase synaptic serotonin. The second claim, which is crucial to resolving this paradox, is that the serotonergic system evolved to regulate energy. By increasing extracellular serotonin, SSRIs disrupt energy homeostasis and often worsen symptoms during acute treatment. Our third claim is that symptom reduction is not achieved by the direct pharmacological properties of SSRIs, but by the brain’s compensatory responses that attempt to restore energy homeostasis. These responses take several weeks to develop, which explains why SSRIs have a therapeutic delay. We demonstrate the utility of our claims by examining what happens in animal models of melancholia and during acute and chronic SSRI treatment.

Concepts: Serotonin, Antidepressant, Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, Major depressive disorder, Sertraline, Tricyclic antidepressant, Fluoxetine, Paroxetine

28

Serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) are antidepressants which have high affinity to both serotonin transporter (SERT) and norepinephrine transporter (NET). In studies in vitro, SNRIs have been reported to show a large variability in the affinity ratio between SERT and NET. For instance, the reported affinity ratio is about 30 for venlafaxine and 1.6 for milnacipran. In this study in nonhuman primates, we aimed to investigate the relationship between SERT and NET affinity by measuring the in vivo occupancy at both transporters of venlafaxine and milnacipran.

Concepts: Serotonin, Antidepressant, Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, Major depressive disorder, Dopamine, Norepinephrine, Tricyclic antidepressant, Reuptake inhibitor