SciCombinator

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Concept: Tranexamic acid

59

Evidence on prehospital administration of the antifibrinolytic tranexamic acid (TXA) in civilian trauma populations is scarce. The aim was to study whether prehospital TXA use in trauma patients was associated with improved outcomes.

Concepts: Hereditary angioedema, Antifibrinolytics, Tranexamic acid, Antifibrinolytic

29

Early administration of tranexamic acid (TXA) has been associated with a reduction in mortality and blood product requirements in severely injured adults. It has also shown significantly reduced blood loss and transfusion requirements in major elective pediatric surgery, but no published data have examined the use of TXA in pediatric trauma.

Concepts: Carbon dioxide, Hospital, Hydrogen, Surgery, Physician, Physical trauma, Tranexamic acid, Blood transfusion

28

A recent large civilian randomized controlled trial on the use of tranexamic acid (TXA) for trauma reported important survival benefits. Subsequently, successful use of TXA for combat casualties in Afghanistan was also reported. As a result of these promising studies, there has been growing interest in the use of TXA for trauma. Potential adverse effects of TXA have also been reported. A US Department of Defense committee conducted a review and assessment of knowledge gaps and research requirements regarding the use of TXA for the treatment of casualties that have experienced traumatic hemorrhage. Here we present identified knowledge gaps and associated research priorities. We believe that important knowledge gaps exist and that a targeted, prioritized research effort will contribute to the refinement of practice guidelines over time.

Concepts: Present, Time, Pharmacology, Randomized controlled trial, Psychological trauma, Adverse drug reaction, Tranexamic acid, United States Department of Defense

26

Abstract Hemorrhage and coagulopathy remain major drivers of early preventable mortality in military and civilian trauma. The development of trauma-induced coagulopathy and hyperfibrinolysis is associated with poor outcomes. Interest in the use of tranexamic acid (TXA) in hemorrhaging patients as an antifibrinolytic agent has grown recently. Additionally, several reports describe immunomodulatory effects of TXA that may confer benefit independent of its antifibrinolytic actions. A large trial demonstrated a mortality benefit for early TXA administration in patients at risk for hemorrhage; however, questions remain about the applicability in developed trauma systems and the mechanism by which TXA reduces mortality. We describe here the rationale, design, and challenges of the Study of Tranexamic Acid during Air Medical Prehospital transport (STAAMP) trial. The primary objective is to determine the effect of prehospital TXA infusion during air medical transport on 30-day mortality in patients at risk of traumatic hemorrhage. This study is a multicenter, placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized clinical trial. The trial will enroll trauma patients with hypotension and tachycardia from 4 level I trauma center air medical transport programs. It includes a 2-phase intervention, with a prehospital and in-hospital phase to investigate multiple dosing regimens. The trial will also explore the effects of TXA on the coagulation and inflammatory response following injury. The trial will be conducted under exception for informed consent for emergency research and thus required an investigational new drug approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as well as a community consultation process. It was designed to address several existing knowledge gaps and research priorities regarding TXA use in trauma.

Concepts: Pharmacology, Clinical trial, Blood, Informed consent, Pharmaceutical industry, Clinical research, Physical trauma, Tranexamic acid

25

Tranexamic acid (TXA) is an antifibrinolytic drug used to reduce bleeding in mortality risk situations such as trauma, cardiovascular surgery, and orthopedic surgery. The objective is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of TXA in reducing surgery bleeding in hip arthroplasty through a systematic review of literature.

Concepts: Carbon dioxide, Blood, Hip replacement, Orthopedic surgery, Joint replacement, Tranexamic acid, Antifibrinolytic, John Charnley

4

Hemorrhage remains the leading cause of preventable trauma-associated mortality. Interventions that improve prehospital hemorrhage control and resuscitation are needed. Tranexamic acid (TXA) has recently been shown to reduce mortality in trauma patients when administered upon hospital admission, and available data suggest that early dosing confers maximum benefit. Data regarding TXA implementation in prehospital trauma care and analyses of alternatives are lacking. This review examines the available evidence that would inform selection of hemostatic interventions to improve outcomes in prehospital trauma management as part of a broader strategy of “remote damage-control resuscitation” (RDCR).

Concepts: Medicine, Critical thinking, Hospital, Evidence-based medicine, Hemostasis, Management, Emergency medical services, Tranexamic acid

4

Tranexamic acid (TXA) is well-established as a versatile oral, intramuscular, and intravenous (IV) antifibrinolytic agent. However, the efficacy of IV TXA in reducing perioperative blood transfusion in spinal surgery is poorly documented.

Concepts: HIV, AIDS, Acid, Antifibrinolytics, Tranexamic acid, Blood transfusion, Antifibrinolytic

2

The CRASH-2 trial showed that tranexamic acid (TXA) administration reduces mortality in bleeding trauma patients. However, the effect appeared to depend on how soon after injury TXA treatment was started. Treatment within 3 h reduced bleeding deaths whereas treatment after 3 h increased the risk. We examine how patient characteristics vary by time to treatment and explore whether any such variations explain the time-dependent treatment effect.

Concepts: Patient, Hospital, Physical trauma, Tranexamic acid, Explorer, Exploration

2

Trauma is the leading cause of death among children aged 1-18. Studies indicate that better control of bleeding could potentially prevent 10-20% of trauma-related deaths. The antifibrinolytic agent tranexamic acid (TxA) has shown promise in haemorrhage control in adult trauma patients. However, information on the potential benefits of TxA in children remains sparse. This review proposes to evaluate the current uses, benefits and adverse effects of TxA in the bleeding paediatric trauma population.

Concepts: Death, Demography, Antifibrinolytics, Tranexamic acid, Antifibrinolytic

2

This study tested the hypothesis that early routine use of tranexamic acid (TXA) reduces mortality in a subset of the most critically injured trauma intensive care unit patients.

Concepts: Intensive care medicine, Physical trauma, Tranexamic acid