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Concept: The Next Time

974

Over 500 million people interact daily with Facebook. Yet, whether Facebook use influences subjective well-being over time is unknown. We addressed this issue using experience-sampling, the most reliable method for measuring in-vivo behavior and psychological experience. We text-messaged people five times per day for two-weeks to examine how Facebook use influences the two components of subjective well-being: how people feel moment-to-moment and how satisfied they are with their lives. Our results indicate that Facebook use predicts negative shifts on both of these variables over time. The more people used Facebook at one time point, the worse they felt the next time we text-messaged them; the more they used Facebook over two-weeks, the more their life satisfaction levels declined over time. Interacting with other people “directly” did not predict these negative outcomes. They were also not moderated by the size of people’s Facebook networks, their perceived supportiveness, motivation for using Facebook, gender, loneliness, self-esteem, or depression. On the surface, Facebook provides an invaluable resource for fulfilling the basic human need for social connection. Rather than enhancing well-being, however, these findings suggest that Facebook may undermine it.

Concepts: Psychology, Motivation, Need, Happiness, Fundamental human needs, Subjective life satisfaction, The Next Time, Criticism of Facebook

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Objective: This study evaluated whether social-cognitive theory (SCT) variables, as measured by questionnaire and ecological momentary assessment (EMA), predicted exercise in endometrial cancer survivors. Method: One hundred posttreatment endometrial cancer survivors received a 6-month home-based exercise intervention. EMAs were conducted by using hand-held computers for 10- to 12-day periods every 2 months. Participants rated morning self-efficacy and positive and negative outcome expectations by using the computer, recorded exercise information in real time and at night, and wore accelerometers. At the midpoint of each assessment period, participants completed SCT questionnaires. Using linear mixed-effects models, the authors tested whether morning SCT variables predicted minutes of exercise that day (Question 1) and whether exercise minutes at time point Tj could be predicted by questionnaire measures of SCT variables from time point Tj-1 (Question 2). Results: Morning self-efficacy significantly predicted that day’s exercise minutes (p < .0001). Morning positive outcome expectations were also associated with exercise minutes (p = .0003), but the relationship was attenuated when self-efficacy was included in the model (p = .4032). Morning negative outcome expectations were not associated with exercise minutes. Of the questionnaire measures of SCT variables, only exercise self-efficacy predicted exercise at the next time point (p = .003). Conclusions: The consistency of the relationship between self-efficacy and exercise minutes over short (same day) and longer (Tj to Tj-1) time periods provides support for a causal relationship. The strength of the relationship between morning self-efficacy and exercise minutes suggest that real-time interventions that target daily variation in self-efficacy may benefit endometrial cancer survivors' exercise adherence. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

Concepts: Cancer, Causality, Estrogen, Menstrual cycle, Endometrium, Endometrial cancer, All rights reserved, The Next Time

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Please can we have our ball back mister? ‘Just this once. But tell your dad that the next time it comes over here, it’s going in the bin.’

Concepts: Mother, The Next Time