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Concept: Teaching

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Background: Medical students value teaching by junior doctors and find it comparable to consultant-led teaching. Although several junior doctor-led teaching programmes have been developed, there is insufficient information in the literature to guide junior doctors planning on developing such programmes. Aim: This article gives junior doctors 12 practical tips on how they might develop and run successful teaching programmes for medical students. Results: The 12 tips are (1) Clearly define the scope of your programme, (2) Ensure student-defined learning goals are included at an early stage, (3) Inform and involve your fellow junior doctors in teaching, (4) Plan teaching rotas in advance, (5) Learn to teach effectively by attending courses, (6) Promote your programme to medical students as widely as possible, (7) Use varied and interactive teaching methods, (8) Establish rapport with students, (9) Include assessment as part of the teaching programme, (10) Seek feedback from attendees and senior faculty, (11) Establish rules for tutorials and (12) Secure formal recognition for your scheme. Conclusions: These 12 tips may help junior doctors to develop and manage successful teaching programmes. It may also be a useful guide for senior faculty advising junior doctors who aspire to establish such teaching programmes.

Concepts: Education, University, Learning, Program, School, Teacher, Teaching

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Active-learning pedagogies have been repeatedly demonstrated to produce superior learning gains with large effect sizes compared with lecture-based pedagogies. Shifting large numbers of college science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) faculty to include any active learning in their teaching may retain and more effectively educate far more students than having a few faculty completely transform their teaching, but the extent to which STEM faculty are changing their teaching methods is unclear. Here, we describe the development and application of the machine-learning-derived algorithm Decibel Analysis for Research in Teaching (DART), which can analyze thousands of hours of STEM course audio recordings quickly, with minimal costs, and without need for human observers. DART analyzes the volume and variance of classroom recordings to predict the quantity of time spent on single voice (e.g., lecture), multiple voice (e.g., pair discussion), and no voice (e.g., clicker question thinking) activities. Applying DART to 1,486 recordings of class sessions from 67 courses, a total of 1,720 h of audio, revealed varied patterns of lecture (single voice) and nonlecture activity (multiple and no voice) use. We also found that there was significantly more use of multiple and no voice strategies in courses for STEM majors compared with courses for non-STEM majors, indicating that DART can be used to compare teaching strategies in different types of courses. Therefore, DART has the potential to systematically inventory the presence of active learning with ∼90% accuracy across thousands of courses in diverse settings with minimal effort.

Concepts: Psychology, Education, Educational psychology, Learning, Effect size, Pedagogy, Teaching, Darts

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School visits to farms are a positive educational experience but pose risks due to the spread of zoonotic infections. A lesson plan to raise awareness about microbes on the farm and preventative behaviours was developed in response to the Griffin Investigation into the E. coli outbreak associated with Godstone Farm in 2009. This study evaluated the effectiveness of the delivery of the lesson plan in increasing knowledge about the spread of infection on the farm, amongst school students.

Concepts: Bacteria, Understanding, Education, School, Teacher, Pedagogy, Teaching, Lesson plan

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There are strong theoretical arguments for using narratives in teaching and learning within medicine, but little is known about how they are used in medical lectures. This study explores the types of narratives lecturers use, the attitudes of lecturers and students to the use of narratives in teaching, and the aspects of learning that narratives may facilitate.

Concepts: Scientific method, Psychology, Medicine, Education, Educational psychology, Learning, History of education, Teaching

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Interpreting an electrocardiogram (ECG) is not only one of the most important parts of clinical diagnostics but also one of the most difficult topics to teach and learn. In order to enable medical students to master ECG interpretation skills in a limited teaching period, the flipped teaching method has been recommended by previous research to improve teaching effect on undergraduate ECG learning.

Concepts: Psychology, Education, Skill, Learning, Study skills, Electrocardiography, History of education, Teaching

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DECISION+2, a Web-based tutorial, was designed to train family physicians in shared decision making (SDM) regarding the use of antibiotics for acute respiratory infections (ARIs). It is currently mandatory for second-year family medicine residents at Université Laval, Quebec, Canada. However, little is known about how such tutorials are used, their effect on knowledge scores, or how best to assess resident participation.

Concepts: Medicine, Physician, Cognition, Learning, Medical school, Montreal, Plato, Teaching

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Librarians often teach evidence-based practice (EBP) within health sciences curricula. It is not known what teaching methods are most effective.

Concepts: Medicine, Evidence-based medicine, Education, Health science, Teacher, Curriculum, Teaching

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Undergraduate palliative care education (UPCE) was mandatorily incorporated in medical education in Germany in 2009. Implementation of the new cross-sectional examination subject of palliative care (QB13) continues to be a major challenge for medical schools. It is clear that there is a need among students for more UPCE. On the other hand, there is a lack of teaching resources and patient availabilities for the practical lessons. Digital media and elearning might be one solution to this problem. The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the elearning course Palliative Care Basics, with regard to students' acceptance of this teaching method and their performance in the written examination on the topic of palliative care. In addition, students' self-estimation in competence in palliative care was assessed.

Concepts: Oncology, Education, Physician, Medical school, School, Teacher, History of education, Teaching

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To improve health and academic learning in schoolchildren, the Active School programme in Stavanger, Norway has introduced physically active academic lessons. This is a teaching method combining physical activity with academic content. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the response to the physically active lessons and identify facilitators and barriers for implementation of such an intervention.

Concepts: Physical exercise, Education, Weight loss, Learning, Computer program, School, Teaching

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Peer tutoring has been described as “people from similar social groupings who are not professional teachers helping each other to learn and learning themselves by teaching”. Peer tutoring is well accepted as a source of support in many medical curricula, where participation and learning involve a process of socialisation. Peer tutoring can ease the transition of the junior students from the university class environment to the hospital workplace. In this paper, we apply the Experienced Based Learning (ExBL) model to explore medical students' perceptions of their experience of taking part in a newly established peer tutoring program at a hospital based clinical school.

Concepts: Psychology, Education, Physician, Learning, Knowledge, School, Teacher, Teaching