SciCombinator

Discover the most talked about and latest scientific content & concepts.

Concept: Surgical oncology

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BACKGROUND: Endoscopic thyroidectomy is a well-established surgical technique. We have been utilizing precordial video-assisted neck surgery (VANS) with a gasless anterior neck skin lifting method. Recently, natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) has generated excitement among surgeons as potentially scar-free surgery. We developed an innovative gasless transoral technique for endoscopic thyroidectomy that incorporated the concept of NOTES in a VANS-technique. METHODS: Incision was made at the vestibulum under the inferior lip. From the vestibulum to the anterior cervical region, a subplatysmal tunnel in front of the mandible was created and cervical skin was lifted by Kirschner wires and a mechanical retracting system. This method without CO(2) insufflation created an effective working space and provided an excellent cranio-caudal view so that we could perform thyroidectomy and central node dissection safely. RESULTS: Beginning with our first clinical application of TOVANS in September 2009, we have performed eight such procedures. Three of the eight patients had papillary microcarcinoma and received central node dissection after thyroidectomy. All patients began oral intake 1 day after surgery. The sensory disorder around the chin persisted more than 6 months after surgery in all patients. Recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy revealed in one patient. Nobody had mental nerve palsy, and no infection developed with use of preventive antibacterial tablets for 3 days. CONCLUSIONS: We developed a new method for gasless transoral endoscopic thyroidectomy with a premandible approach and anterior neck-skin lifting. TOVANS makes possible complete endoscopic radical lymphadenectomy for papillary thyroid cancer. We believe that this method is innovative and progressive and has not only a cosmetic advantage but also provides easy access to the central node compartment for dissection in endoscopic thyroid cancer surgery.

Concepts: Hospital, Surgery, Physician, Al-Andalus, Antiseptic, Surgeon, Thyroidectomy, Surgical oncology

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Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) pathways have been shown in multiple surgical disciplines to improve outcomes, including reduced opioid consumption, length of stay, and post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV). However, very few studies describe the application of ERAS to breast surgery and even fewer describe ERAS for outpatient surgery. We describe the implementation and efficacy of an Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) pathway for total skin-sparing mastectomy with immediate reconstruction in an outpatient setting.

Concepts: Surgery, Chemotherapy, Anesthesia, Opioid, Vomiting, Surgical oncology, Postoperative nausea and vomiting, Hypnosurgery

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Women diagnosed with breast cancer often describe the process of treatment decision making as bewildering and worrisome. Patients who do not feel completely informed about their surgical options might make choices that are suboptimal or regretted later. The Institute of Medicine has called for more research on why breast cancer patients are inadequately informed about treatment options. The aims of the study were to explore how women become informed about their breast cancer surgery treatment options and to identify improvement opportunities.

Concepts: Medicine, Cancer, Breast cancer, Chemotherapy, Physician, Breast, Surgical oncology, Mastectomy

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Surgical innovations disseminate in the absence of coordinated systems to ensure their safe integration into clinical practice, potentially exposing patients to increased risk for medical error.

Concepts: Medical terms, Hospital, Surgery, Physician, Minimally invasive, Safety, Patient safety, Surgical oncology

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Multimodal strategies before surgery are often used to improve outcomes, but disease progression (precluding surgical resection) and inoperability at planned surgery still occur following neoadjuvant treatment. The standards of reporting of these outcomes have not previously been considered. This study examined reporting of rates of progression to surgical resection and inoperability at planned surgery following neoadjuvant treatment in surgical oncology, using esophageal cancer as a case study.

Concepts: Medicine, Cancer, Oncology, Obesity, Surgery, Chemotherapy, Helicobacter pylori, Surgical oncology

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Carcinomas arising in the thyroglossal duct cysts are rare, accounting only for about 0.7-1.5 % of all thyroglossal duct cysts.1 (-) 3 Synchronous occurrence of thyroglossal duct carcinoma and thyroid carcinoma is reported to be even rarer.4 Traditionally, surgical treatments of such coexisting thyroglossal duct cyst carcinoma (TGDCa) and papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) were typically performed through a single transverse or double incisions on the overlying skin. A longer, extended cervical incision might be required if neck dissection is necessary. Though this method provides the operator with the optimal surgical view, the detrimental cosmetic effect on the patient of possessing a scar cannot be avoided, despite the effort of the surgeon to camouflage the scar by placing the incision in natural skin creases. Recently, the authors have previously reported the feasibility of robot-assisted neck dissections via a transaxillary and retroauricular (“TARA”) approach or modified face-lift approach in early head and neck cancers.5 (,) 6 On the basis of the forementioned surgical technique, we demonstrate our novel technique for robot-assisted Sistrunk’s operation via retroauricular approach as well as robot-assisted neck dissection with total thyroidectomy via transaxillary approach.

Concepts: Head and neck, Surgery, Epithelium, Thyroid disease, Al-Andalus, Surgical oncology, Otolaryngology, Thyroglossal cyst

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To evaluate the surgical technique and outcomes of women undergoing the modified approach to vaginal hysterectomy at Harbor-University of California, Los Angeles Medical Center from 2000 to 2011. A retrospective chart review was performed of all vaginal hysterectomy cases performed using the modified technique.

Concepts: Medicine, Surgery, Retrospective, Physician, Hysterectomy, Gynaecology, Laparotomy, Surgical oncology

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WHAT’S KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT? AND WHAT DOES THE STUDY ADD?: The occurence of lymphoceles in patients after radical prostatectomy is well known (2-10%). It appears that patients undergoing open extraperitoneal radical prostatectomy develop more lymphoceles than patients undergoing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy with transperitoneal access. The present study investigates in a prospective randomized manner whether the time of drainage (1 vs 7 days) makes a difference or whether drainage is even necessary. The study data, collected in the same institution, are compared with the incidence of lymphocele in patients treated by robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether routine drainage is advisable after open extended pelvic lymph node dissection (ePLND) and retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP) by measuring the incidence of lymphoceles and comparing these results with those of a series of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) and ePLND. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 331 consecutive patients underwent ePLND and RRP or RARP. The first 132 patients underwent open ePLND and RRP and received two pelvic drains; these patients were prospectively randomized into two groups: group 1 (n = 66), in which the drains were shortened on postoperative (PO) days 3 and 5 and removed on PO day 7, and group 2 (n = 66), in which the drains were removed on PO day 1. The next 199 patients were assigned to two consecutive groups not receiving drainage: group 3 (n = 73) undergoing open ePLND and RRP, followed by group 4 (n = 126) treated by transperitoneal robot-assisted ePLND and RARP. All patients had ultrasonographic controls 5 and 10 days and 3 and 12 months after surgery. RESULTS: Lymphoceles were detected in 6.6% of all patients, 3.3% of whom were asymptomatic and 3.3% of whom were symptomatic. Symptomatic lymphoceles were detected in 0% of group 1, 8% of group 2, 7% of group 3 and 1% of group 4, with groups 2 and 3 differing significantly from group 4 (P < 0.05). In total, 5% of all patients undergoing open RRP (groups 1-3) had symptomatic lymphoceles vs 1% of patients undergoing RARP (group 4) (P = 0.06). Nodal-positive patients had significantly more symptomatic lymphoceles than nodal-negative patients (10% vs 2%) (P < 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: Symptomatic lymphoceles occur less frequently after open RRP and pelvic drainage over 7 days than after open RRP and pelvic drainage over 1 day or without drainage. Patients undergoing RARP without drainage had significantly fewer lymphoceles than patients receiving open RRP without drainage.

Concepts: Lymph node, Touring car racing, FIA, Lymphadenectomy, Surgical oncology, Rally racing terminology

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To analyse oncological and functional outcomes 12 months after treatment of very low risk prostate cancer with radical prostatectomy in men who could have been candidates for active surveillance.

Concepts: Cancer, Metastasis, Oncology, Prostate cancer, Urology, Radiation therapy, Benign prostatic hyperplasia, Surgical oncology