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Concept: Sexual acts

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There is a notable gap between heterosexual men and women in frequency of orgasm during sex. Little is known, however, about sexual orientation differences in orgasm frequency. We examined how over 30 different traits or behaviors were associated with frequency of orgasm when sexually intimate during the past month. We analyzed a large US sample of adults (N = 52,588) who identified as heterosexual men (n = 26,032), gay men (n = 452), bisexual men (n = 550), lesbian women (n = 340), bisexual women (n = 1112), and heterosexual women (n = 24,102). Heterosexual men were most likely to say they usually-always orgasmed when sexually intimate (95%), followed by gay men (89%), bisexual men (88%), lesbian women (86%), bisexual women (66%), and heterosexual women (65%). Compared to women who orgasmed less frequently, women who orgasmed more frequently were more likely to: receive more oral sex, have longer duration of last sex, be more satisfied with their relationship, ask for what they want in bed, praise their partner for something they did in bed, call/email to tease about doing something sexual, wear sexy lingerie, try new sexual positions, anal stimulation, act out fantasies, incorporate sexy talk, and express love during sex. Women were more likely to orgasm if their last sexual encounter included deep kissing, manual genital stimulation, and/or oral sex in addition to vaginal intercourse. We consider sociocultural and evolutionary explanations for these orgasm gaps. The results suggest a variety of behaviors couples can try to increase orgasm frequency.

Concepts: LGBT, Sexual intercourse, Human sexual behavior, Human sexuality, Sexual orientation, Homosexuality, Bisexuality, Sexual acts

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Men who have sex with men (MSM) who identify sex partners over the internet are more likely than other MSM to report having unprotected anal intercourse (UAI). It is unclear whether the internet facilitates pursuit of high-risk sex or whether MSM seeking sex online are a higher-risk population than other MSM. To summarise evidence as to whether internet-based partner selection predisposes MSM to high-risk behaviour, we conducted a meta-analysis of observational studies comparing MSM’s UAI risk in online-initiated encounters to their UAI risk in offline-initiated encounters.

Concepts: Sexual intercourse, Human sexual behavior, Chlamydia infection, Internet, Homosexuality, Sodomy, Sexology, Sexual acts

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Oropharyngeal gonorrhoea is common among men who have sex with men (MSM). We aimed to clarify which oral sex practices were independent risk factors for oropharyngeal gonorrhoea: tongue kissing, receptive oro-penile sex (fellatio) or insertive oro-anal sex (rimming), and whether daily use of mouthwash and recent antibiotic use was protective.

Concepts: Sexual intercourse, Semen, Oral sex, Human sexual behavior, Human sexuality, Chlamydia infection, Foreplay, Sexual acts

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Gay and bisexual men (GBM) have reported viewing significantly more sexually explicit media (SEM) than heterosexual men. There is some evidence that SEM depicting bareback anal sex may be linked to engagement in condomless anal sex (CAS) and thus HIV/STI transmission among GBM. A nationwide sample of HIV-negative GBM in the U.S. completed an online survey that included measures on SEM consumption (both overall frequency and percentage viewed depicting bareback sex) and reported on CAS in the past 3 months. Data showed that there was no main effect for the frequency of SEM watched in association on either the number of CAS acts with casual partners or the probability of engaging in CAS during a casual sex event. However, there was an interaction between amount of SEM consumed and percentage of bareback SEM consumed on both outcomes, such that men who reported both a high frequency of SEM consumption and a high percentage of their SEM being bareback reported the highest levels of risk behavior. These findings highlight the role that barebacking depicted in SEM may play in the normalization of sexual risk behaviors for GBM. Interventions looking to target the role SEM may play in the lives of GBM should examine what variables may help to mediate associations between viewing SEM and engaging in risk behavior.

Concepts: AIDS, Sexual orientation, Homosexuality, Bisexuality, Men who have sex with men, Heterosexuality, Sexual acts, Anal eroticism

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We present the case of an 18-year-old girl who was sexually assaulted with transanal forearm penetration resulting in a fourth-degree perineal laceration. Fisting is an uncommon sexual practice consisting in the penetration of the vagina, anus, or both of them with fingers, hand (fist) or forearm.Perineal lacerations are a relatively common finding in both consensual and nonconsensual fisting victims. Even though cases of fisting with first-, second-, and third-degree lacerations have been reported in literature, only one previous case of fourth-degree perineal laceration has been described in a woman, who died after anal fisting.The clinical and morphological findings related to this sexual practice have been presented. No previous reports concerning nonfatal cases of fourth-degree perineal laceration, due to anal fisting, exists in literature. We report a case in which the forensic evaluation and the identification of the sexual assault were delayed because of both the atypical and uncommon pattern of injury and the unconsciousness of the patient. The information gathered thanks to this article would support forensic pathologists and sexual assault forensic examiners in recognizing doubtful cases, and this is particularly important when the suspect of sexual assault arise.

Concepts: Sexual intercourse, Report, Human sexual behavior, Rape, Sexual assault, Sexual acts, Anal eroticism, Fisting

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Background: HIV-risk resilience, or positive adaptation in the face of risk, is increasingly being recognised as an important characteristic among men who have sex with men (MSM). However, resilience in the context of online partner seeking remains underexplored among MSM. Methods: Using content analysis methodology, this study operationalised indicators of HIV-risk resilience in the profiles of 933 MSM using a sexual networking website. HIV-risk resilience included endorsing foreplay only (non-penetrative sex) or a versatile sexual position; being “out” (e.g. disclosed sexual orientation), having a profile photo, seeking friendship, seeking a relationship, serosorting, not endorsing alcohol or drug use, safer sexual adventurism (e.g. role playing, bondage), and safer sex. Results: The majority of men were between 18 and 35 years old (76.0%) and 73.3% were racial/ethnic minorities. The mean number of resilience components endorsed was 5.2 (s.d. = 1.5; range 0-9). Nearly half (48.0%) reported being “out” and 68.7% had a profile photo. The majority of men were seeking relationships (66.5%) and/or friendships (69.7%), were sexually versatile (53.3%), and preferred safer sex only (76.3%). The majority did not endorse drug use (82.0%) and 25.4% did not endorse alcohol use. Nearly one-quarter (21.4%) endorsed sexual adventurism and 2.5% were serosorting by partner’s HIV negative status. Conclusion: HIV-risk resilience may be common among MSM using sexual networking websites and may manifest in safer sex intentions. Rather than exclusively focusing on sexual risk reduction, health promotion efforts targeting MSM online should acknowledge, measure, and leverage existent HIV-risk resilience strategies in this group.

Concepts: HIV, Birth control, Sexual intercourse, Human sexual behavior, Orgasm, Sexual arousal, Sexual acts, Non-penetrative sex

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Epidemiological evidence for the encounter-level association between sexualised drug use and unprotected anal intercourse in men who have sex with men is unclear and has not examined men who have sex with men in England. To estimate this association, we compared dyadic sexual encounters within respondents. We used encounter-level data from a longitudinal online survey of men who have sex with men living in England and multilevel models to test univariate and multivariate associations between any respondent or partner drug use, specific respondent drug use, additional situational characteristics and unprotected anal intercourse. Based on 6742 encounters from 2142 men who have sex with men, respondent drug use and respondent use of certain specific drugs were associated with increased unprotected anal intercourse odds. In univariate models, partner drug use was associated with increased unprotected anal intercourse odds, but in multivariate models, only non-specific knowledge of partner drug use was associated with the same. Encounters with non-regular-and-steady partners or that were not HIV-seroconcordant were associated with decreased unprotected anal intercourse odds. This is the first within-subjects comparison of drug use and unprotected anal intercourse conducted on a sample from England, and the largest of its kind. Findings are consistent with other studies, though associations between drug use and unprotected anal intercourse are shaped by social contexts that may change over time.

Concepts: Sexual intercourse, Human sexual behavior, Chlamydia infection, Homosexuality, Sodomy, Sexology, Anal sex, Sexual acts

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Men who have sex with men (MSM), particularly racial/ethnic minority MSM, are disproportionately affected by HIV in the United States and Texas. Bareback sex or condomless anal intercourse (CAI) can be a high HIV risk behavior. Despite this, a majority of MSM continues to engage in barebacking. Research suggests racial/ethnic differences in barebacking exist; however, these conclusions remain unclear due to insufficient sample sizes to compare racial/ethnic groups. Our cross-sectional correlational design explores barebacking correlates (substance use during sex, safe sex fatigue, and optimistic HIV treatment beliefs) within and between racial/ethnic groups among 366 MSM. Regression models are significant for Latino and African-American MSM alone and for all MSM combined, though not significant for European-American and Other Race/Ethnicity MSM alone. Our findings suggest motivations and behaviors underlying barebacking among MSM vary by racial/ethnic membership with clinical implications for informing culturally sensitive HIV interventions and prevention programs for target racial/ethnic groups.

Concepts: HIV, AIDS, Sexual intercourse, United States, Sodomy, Sexual acts, Anal eroticism, Pre-condom

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Although there are practices other than condomless anal intercourse that may result in HIV transmission among gay and bisexual men, very little is known about these ‘uncommon’ transmission explanations. To address this topic, the free text survey responses from 465 HIV positive gay men in Australia were thematically analysed; 123 participants offered uncommon explanations for their seroconversion. Men described several sexual acts they believed led to infection, categorised as adventurous sex (e.g., fisting) and foreplay (e.g., oral sex). Participants also identified mediating factors associated with their seroconversion, either internal (e.g., cum/pre-cum) or external (e.g., sores, illness) to sex. Finally, contextual forces associated with infection were also explored, namely physical spaces (e.g., sex on premises venues) or mental states (e.g., depression). While some uncommon explanations are unlikely to have resulted in HIV transmission, these accounts reveal the diverse and intersecting ways that men attempt to make sense of their seroconversion.

Concepts: HIV, Sexual intercourse, Oral sex, Human sexual behavior, Foreplay, Homosexuality, Men who have sex with men, Sexual acts

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To understand associations between location of sex and sexual risk, it is most helpful to compare sexual encounters within persons. We systematically reviewed within-subjects comparisons of sexual encounters reported by men who have sex with men (MSM) with respect to location of sex. Within-subjects comparisons of sexual risk and location of sex were eligible if they collected data post-1996 from samples of MSM. We independently screened results and full-text records in duplicate. Of 6,336 deduplicated records, we assessed 138 full-text studies and included six, most of which compared unprotected anal intercourse against other anal intercourse. This small, but high quality, body of evidence suggests that associations between attendance at sex-on-premises venues and person-level sexual risk may be due to overall propensity towards unprotected sex. However, there may be some location factors that promote or are associated with serononconcordant unprotected anal intercourse. Health promoters may wish to focus on person-level characteristics.

Concepts: Sexual intercourse, Human sexual behavior, Chlamydia infection, Homosexuality, Sodomy, Sexology, Anal sex, Sexual acts