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Concept: Renal function

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BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to determine the effects of creatine supplementation on kidney function in resistance-trained individuals ingesting a high-protein diet. METHODS: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was performed. The participants were randomly allocated to receive either creatine (20 g/d for 5 d followed by 5 g/d throughout the trial) or placebo for 12 weeks. All of the participants were engaged in resistance training and consumed a high-protein diet (i.e., >= 1.2 g/Kg/d). Subjects were assessed at baseline (Pre) and after 12 weeks (Post). Glomerular filtration rate was measured by 51Cr-EDTA clearance. Additionally, blood samples and a 24-h urine collection were obtained for other kidney function assessments. RESULTS: No significant differences were observed for 51Cr-EDTA clearance throughout the trial (Creatine: Pre 101.42 +/- 13.11, Post 108.78 +/- 14.41 mL/min/1.73m2; Placebo: Pre 103.29 +/- 17.64, Post 106.68 +/- 16.05 mL/min/1.73m2; group x time interaction: F = 0.21, p = 0.64). Creatinine clearance, serum and urinary urea, electrolytes, proteinuria, and albuminuria remained virtually unchanged. CONCLUSIONS: A 12-week creatine supplementation protocol did not affect kidney function in resistance-trained healthy individuals consuming a high-protein diet; thus reinforcing the safety of this dietary supplement.Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01817673.

Concepts: Renal failure, Kidney, Nephrology, Renal physiology, Renal function, Blood urea nitrogen, Electrolyte, Urea

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The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Gd-chelate on renal function, iron parameters and oxidative stress in rats with CRF and a possible protective effect of the antioxidant N-Acetylcysteine (NAC). Male Wistar rats were submitted to 5/6 nephrectomy (Nx) to induced CRF. An ionic-cyclic Gd (Gadoterate Meglumine) was administrated (1.5 mM/KgBW, intravenously) 21 days after Nx. Clearance studies were performed in 4 groups of anesthetized animals 48 hours following Gd- chelate administration: 1–Nx (n = 7); 2–Nx+NAC (n = 6); 3–Nx+Gd (n = 7); 4–Nx+NAC+Gd (4.8 g/L in drinking water), initiated 2 days before Gd-chelate administration and maintained during 4 days (n = 6). This group was compared with a control. We measured glomerular filtration rate, GFR (inulin clearance, ml/min/kg BW), proteinuria (mg/24 hs), serum iron (µg/dL); serum ferritin (ng/mL); transferrin saturation (%), TIBC (µg/dL) and TBARS (nmles/ml). Normal rats treated with the same dose of Gd-chelate presented similar GFR and proteinuria when compared with normal controls, indicating that at this dose Gd-chelate is not nephrotoxic to normal rats. Gd-chelate administration to Nx-rats results in a decrease of GFR and increased proteinuria associated with a decrease in TIBC, elevation of ferritin serum levels, transferrin oversaturation and plasmatic TBARS compared with Nx-rats. The prophylactic treatment with NAC reversed the decrease in GFR and the increase in proteinuria and all alterations in iron parameters and TBARS induced by Gd-chelate. NAC administration to Nx rat did not modify the inulin clearance and iron kinetics, indicating that the ameliorating effect of NAC was specific to Gd-chelate. These results suggest that NAC can prevent Gd-chelate nephrotoxicity in patients with chronic renal failure.

Concepts: Renal failure, Kidney, Nephrology, Dialysis, Renal function, Transferrin, Transferrin saturation, Serum iron

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To assess the risk of medication errors in subjects with renal impairment (defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≤40 ml/min/1.73 m(2)) and the effectiveness of automatic eGFR ≤40-alerts relayed to community pharmacists.

Concepts: Renal failure, Kidney, Nephrology, Dialysis, Glomerulus, Renal function

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The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of vildagliptin 50 mg once daily in patients with severe renal impairment (estimated glomerular filtration rate < 30 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) and longstanding type 2 diabetes not adequately controlled with insulin therapy, which is a difficult-to-treat population, with limited therapeutic options and a high susceptibility to hypoglycemia.

Concepts: Renal failure, Nephrology, Dialysis, Insulin, Diabetes mellitus type 2, Diabetes mellitus, Diabetes mellitus type 1, Renal function

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Background In previous analyses of BENEFIT, a phase 3 study, belatacept-based immunosuppression, as compared with cyclosporine-based immunosuppression, was associated with similar patient and graft survival and significantly improved renal function in kidney-transplant recipients. Here we present the final results from this study. Methods We randomly assigned kidney-transplant recipients to a more-intensive belatacept regimen, a less-intensive belatacept regimen, or a cyclosporine regimen. Efficacy and safety outcomes for all patients who underwent randomization and transplantation were analyzed at year 7 (month 84). Results A total of 666 participants were randomly assigned to a study group and underwent transplantation. Of the 660 patients who were treated, 153 of the 219 patients treated with the more-intensive belatacept regimen, 163 of the 226 treated with the less-intensive belatacept regimen, and 131 of the 215 treated with the cyclosporine regimen were followed for the full 84-month period; all available data were used in the analysis. A 43% reduction in the risk of death or graft loss was observed for both the more-intensive and the less-intensive belatacept regimens as compared with the cyclosporine regimen (hazard ratio with the more-intensive regimen, 0.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.35 to 0.95; P=0.02; hazard ratio with the less-intensive regimen, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.35 to 0.94; P=0.02), with equal contributions from the lower rates of death and graft loss. The mean estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) increased over the 7-year period with both belatacept regimens but declined with the cyclosporine regimen. The cumulative frequencies of serious adverse events at month 84 were similar across treatment groups. Conclusions Seven years after transplantation, patient and graft survival and the mean eGFR were significantly higher with belatacept (both the more-intensive regimen and the less-intensive regimen) than with cyclosporine. (Funded by Bristol-Myers Squibb; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00256750 .).

Concepts: Renal failure, Kidney, Nephrology, Renal physiology, Renal function, Organ transplant, Electrolyte, Bristol-Myers Squibb

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Background In a previous trial involving patients with early autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD; estimated creatinine clearance, ≥60 ml per minute), the vasopressin V2-receptor antagonist tolvaptan slowed the growth in total kidney volume and the decline in the estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) but also caused more elevations in aminotransferase and bilirubin levels. The efficacy and safety of tolvaptan in patients with later-stage ADPKD are unknown. Methods We conducted a phase 3, randomized withdrawal, multicenter, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. After an 8-week prerandomization period that included sequential placebo and tolvaptan run-in phases, during which each patient’s ability to take tolvaptan without dose-limiting side effects was assessed, 1370 patients with ADPKD who were either 18 to 55 years of age with an estimated GFR of 25 to 65 ml per minute per 1.73 m(2) of body-surface area or 56 to 65 years of age with an estimated GFR of 25 to 44 ml per minute per 1.73 m(2) were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive tolvaptan or placebo for 12 months. The primary end point was the change in the estimated GFR from baseline to follow-up, with adjustment for the exact duration that each patient participated (interpolated to 1 year). Safety assessments were conducted monthly. Results The change from baseline in the estimated GFR was -2.34 ml per minute per 1.73 m(2) (95% confidence interval [CI], -2.81 to -1.87) in the tolvaptan group, as compared with -3.61 ml per minute per 1.73 m(2) (95% CI, -4.08 to -3.14) in the placebo group (difference, 1.27 ml per minute per 1.73 m(2); 95% CI, 0.86 to 1.68; P<0.001). Elevations in the alanine aminotransferase level (to >3 times the upper limit of the normal range) occurred in 38 of 681 patients (5.6%) in the tolvaptan group and in 8 of 685 (1.2%) in the placebo group. Elevations in the aminotransferase level were reversible after stopping tolvaptan. No elevations in the bilirubin level of more than twice the upper limit of the normal range were detected. Conclusions Tolvaptan resulted in a slower decline than placebo in the estimated GFR over a 1-year period in patients with later-stage ADPKD. (Funded by Otsuka Pharmaceuticals and Otsuka Pharmaceutical Development and Commercialization; REPRISE ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02160145 .).

Concepts: Kidney, Nephrology, Renal physiology, Renal function, Blood urea nitrogen, Placebo, Normal distribution, Polycystic kidney disease

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Background Relatively high plasma levels of soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) have been associated with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and poor clinical outcomes in patients with various conditions. It is unknown whether elevated suPAR levels in patients with normal kidney function are associated with future decline in the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and with incident chronic kidney disease. Methods We measured plasma suPAR levels in 3683 persons enrolled in the Emory Cardiovascular Biobank (mean age, 63 years; 65% men; median suPAR level, 3040 pg per milliliter) and determined renal function at enrollment and at subsequent visits in 2292 persons. The relationship between suPAR levels and the eGFR at baseline, the change in the eGFR over time, and the development of chronic kidney disease (eGFR <60 ml per minute per 1.73 m(2) of body-surface area) were analyzed with the use of linear mixed models and Cox regression after adjustment for demographic and clinical variables. Results A higher suPAR level at baseline was associated with a greater decline in the eGFR during follow-up; the annual change in the eGFR was -0.9 ml per minute per 1.73 m(2) among participants in the lowest quartile of suPAR levels as compared with -4.2 ml per minute per 1.73 m(2) among participants in the highest quartile (P<0.001). The 921 participants with a normal eGFR (≥90 ml per minute per 1.73 m(2)) at baseline had the largest suPAR-related decline in the eGFR. In 1335 participants with a baseline eGFR of at least 60 ml per minute per 1.73 m(2), the risk of progression to chronic kidney disease in the highest quartile of suPAR levels was 3.13 times as high (95% confidence interval, 2.11 to 4.65) as that in the lowest quartile. Conclusions An elevated level of suPAR was independently associated with incident chronic kidney disease and an accelerated decline in the eGFR in the groups studied. (Funded by the Abraham J. and Phyllis Katz Foundation and others.).

Concepts: Renal failure, Kidney, Nephrology, Dialysis, Renal physiology, Renal function, Blood urea nitrogen, Electrolyte

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Can renal prognosis and life expectancy be accurately predicted? Increasingly, the answer is yes. The natural history of different forms of renal disease is becoming clearer; the degree of reduction in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and the magnitude of proteinuria are strong predictors of renal outcome. Actuarial data on life expectancy from the start of renal replacement therapy are available from renal registries such as the U.S. Renal Data System (USRDS), and the UK Renal Registry. Recently, similar data have become available for patients with chronic kidney disease. Data collected from a large population-based registry in Alberta, Canada and stratified for different levels of estimated GFR (eGFR) have shown that the reduction in life expectancy with kidney failure is not a uremic event associated with starting dialysis but a continuous process that is evident from an eGFR of ≤60 ml/min. Nevertheless, despite the poor prognosis of the last stages of renal failure, progress in the treatment and management of these patients and, in particular, of their cardiovascular risk factors continues to improve long-term outcome.

Concepts: Renal failure, Chronic kidney disease, Kidney, Nephrology, Dialysis, Renal function

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Abstract Objectives: β-blocker propranolol was discovered to be highly effective for the treatment of IHs (infantile hemangiomas) since 2008. However, no serious side effects of its use have been reported so far in Asia, especially in China. To determine the safety of this therapy, we analyzed the side effects in 97 infants who used propranolol (2 mg· kg-1· d-1) against hemangioma from 2010 to 2011. Materials and methods: We performed routine blood and urine tests, hepatic and renal function tests, myocardial enzyme, electrolytes and blood sugar levels at baseline. Electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring was performed 48 h after administration of the first dose (2 mg· kg-1· d-1). Every patient (n = 97) was required to report to our hospital once a month. Results: The following adverse effects were observed: bronchial hyperactivity (n = 5), cyanosis and cold extremities (n = 1), agranulocytosis (n = 1), and low body temperature (n = 1). These side effects were reported for the first time in Asia. Conclusions: Although propranolol is effective against IHs, its potential side effects should be considered and appropriate monitoring performed. Further studies need to be conducted to determine the optimal dose and duration of propranolol treatment for large and complex hemangiomas.

Concepts: Therapeutic effect, Enzyme, Glucose, Renal function, Blood sugar, Electrolyte, Sugar, Hemangioma

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Background: Experience with hydroxyethyl starch (HES) in children is limited. This study was conducted to observe the effects of HES or Ringer’s lactate (RL) usage as the priming solution on renal functions in children undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods: After ethical committee approval and parent informed consent, 24 patients were included in this prospective, randomized study. During cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), Group I received RL and Group II received HES (130/0.4) as priming solution. Serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), β2-microglobulin, cystatin C, and urinary albumin and creatinine, serum, and urine electrolytes were analyzed after the induction (T1), before CPB (T2), during CPB (T3), after CPB (T4), at the end of the operation (T5), on 24th hour (T6), and on 48th hour postoperatively (T7). Fractional sodium excretion (FENa), urinary albumin/creatinine ratio, and creatinine clearance were calculated. Drainage, urine output, inotropes, diuretics, and blood requirements were recorded. Results: In both the groups, β2-microglobulin was decreased during CPB and cystatin C was decreased at T3,T4, and T5 periods (p < 0.05) and the levels remained within the normal range. Creatinine clearance did not differ in the HES group, but increased in the RL group (p < 0.05). Urine albumin/creatinine ratio was increased (p < 0.05) after CPB in the HES group, and it increased at T3, T4, and T5 in the RL group (p < 0.05). There were no differences in cystatin C, β2-microglobulin, FENa, urine albumin/creatinine ratio, creatinine clearance, total fluid amount, urine output, drainage, and inotropic and diuretic requirements between the groups. Conclusion: We conclude that usage of HES (130/0.4) did not have negative effects on renal function, and it can be used as a priming solution in pediatric patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

Concepts: Nephrology, Renal physiology, Renal function, Blood urea nitrogen, Creatinine, Electrolyte, Urea, Cystatin C