SciCombinator

Discover the most talked about and latest scientific content & concepts.

Concept: Razor

0

Invasive traditional practices which are frequently harmful are common in the care of children including neonates in developing countries. We report two cases of evisceration of intra-abdominal viscera in two neonates subjected to abdominal scarification with razor blades following febrile illnesses. The greater omentum and a loop of jejunum, respectively, were eviscerated. Both were successfully managed and discharged home. Consent was obtained from the parents for the use of the photos. These cases highlight the dangers of invasive traditional practices on neonates and the urgent need for enlightenment campaigns as well as enactment of policies to help protect these children in developing countries.

Concepts: Health care, Developing country, Abdomen, Greater omentum, Cutting tools, Shaving, Razor

0

Ingestion of a foreign body is mostly accidental in children and intentional in prisoners to achieve hospitalization; however, use of this method of suicide is rare. We report a case where the victim first ingested a safety razor blade, but failed to die and then hanged himself, but failed again and finally succumbed to the complications on the sixth day. He had also attempted suicide by inflicting multiple incised wounds on his neck four days before the safety blade ingestion, but none were fatal.

Concepts: Death, Ingestion, Suicide, Hanging, Victim, Suicide methods, Cutting tools, Razor

0

The shaving challenge represents a technical contradiction, whereby many of the requirements to improve hair removal efficacy can also result in increased damage to the surrounding skin. Poor-quality shaving can cause a significant inflammatory response of the skin, which may consequently lead to skin irritation and soreness. This study aims to explore and quantify the forces that act upon the skin and hair during the shave and suggests that careful management of these forces is essential in optimizing the shaving process. Various razor features are discussed and their impact on the resulting biomechanical forces is considered. Recent data are included comparing a basic low-tier disposable razor with a more technologically advanced premium system razor and show significant differences in both subjective shave attribute scores and resulting blood flux in the skin.

Concepts: Immune system, Inflammation, Irritation, Depilation, Shaving, Razor, Barber, Head shaving

0

Pseudofolliculitis barbae (PFB) is an inflammatory condition of the beard area, with a high prevalence in men of subequatorial African ancestry and, to a much lesser extent, Indo-Europeans. But it can affect both men and women of all ethnicities. Invariably reported as being associated with shaving, recent evidence suggests a strong genetic component in patients with persistent PFB. There is a lack of robust clinical evidence to support recommendations to avoid or curtail shaving or to shave with a single-blade razor. There is recent clinical evidence that PFB is not exacerbated by daily shaving with a multiblade razor as part of a regimen. Further, there is preliminary evidence that a daily shaving regimen, which includes pre-shave hydration and post-shave moisturization, may be beneficial. To develop evidence-based initial management strategies for PFB, there is a requirement for more randomized blinded clinical trials comparing the use of multi- and single-edge razors, different shaving techniques, shaving frequencies and pre- and post-shaving cosmetic products.

Concepts: The Canon of Medicine, Evidence-based medicine, Avicenna, Shaving, Pseudofolliculitis barbae, Razor, Barber, Beard

0

The intentional ingestion of foreign objects (IIFO) is described more commonly in prison populations than in the general population, with an estimated annual incidence of 1 in 1900 inmates in our state correctional facilities. Incidents often involve ingestion of small metal objects (e.g., paperclips, razor blades) or other commonly available items like pens or eating utensils. Despite ingestion of relatively sharp objects, most episodes can be clinically managed with either observation or endoscopy. Surgery should be reserved for those with signs or symptoms of gastrointestinal perforation or obstruction. For those with a history of IIFO, efforts should focus on prevention of recurrence as subsequent episodes are associated with higher morbidity, significant healthcare and security costs. The pattern of IIFO is often repetitive, with escalation both in frequency of ingestions and in number of items ingested. Little is known about successful prevention strategies, but efforts to monitor patients and provide psychiatric care are potential best-practice strategies. This article aims to provide state-of-the art review on the topic, followed by a set of basic recommendations.

Concepts: Costs, Population, Eating, Ingestion, Digestive system, Prison, Episode, Razor

0

A useful application of the flexible razor blade in Mohs micrographic surgery that can save time and result in a well-presented specimen is described.

Concepts: Mohs surgery, Frederic E. Mohs, Razor

0

This study evaluated epidemiological factors for HCV infection associated with sharing perforating and cutting instruments among candidates for blood donation (CBD) in the city of Belém, Pará, Brazilian Amazon. Two definitions of HCV infection cases were used: anti-HCV positivity shown by EIA, and HCV-RNA detection by PCR. Infected and uninfected CBD completed a questionnaire about possible risk factors associated with sharing perforating and cutting instruments. The information was evaluated using simple and multiple logistic regressions. Between May and November 2010, 146 (1.1%) persons with anti-HCV antibodies and 106 (0.8%) with HCV-RNA were detected among 13,772 CBD in Belém. Risk factors associated with HCV infection based on the EIA (model 1) and PCR (model 2) results were: use of needles and syringes sterilized at home; shared use of razors at home, sharing of disposable razors in barbershops, beauty salons etc.; and sharing manicure and pedicure material. The models of HCV infection associated with sharing perforating and cutting instruments should be taken into account by local and regional health authorities and by those of other countries with similar cultural practices, in order to provide useful information to guide political and public strategies to control HCV transmission.

Concepts: Epidemiology, Infectious disease, Blood, Infection, Hepatitis C, Amazon Basin, Razor

0

A 30-year-old woman presented to the emergency department complaining of abdominal discomfort. An abdominal radiograph was done, revealing ten rectangular razor blades measuring 5 × 2 cm. The patient was taken to the operating room and a flexible esophago-gastroduodenoscopy was performed. Attempts at retrieval, using both a gastric overtube and an inverted hood, were unsuccessful due to the shape and size of the blades. She was transferred to a regular medical floor and managed conservatively with serial abdominal radiographs. Over the next week, she passed the razor blades transanally without further event-all were still wrapped in paper and chewing gum-and was cleared to be discharged home.

Concepts: X-ray, Hospital, Medical imaging, Digestive system, Acute abdomen, Cutting tools, Razor

0

Between July 5 and 21, 2011, an outbreak of neurosurgical site infections with carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumonia occurred in a tertiary care hospital. The outbreak affected 7 patients. The subsequent investigation revealed that a barber’s contaminated shaving razor may have caused the carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumonia outbreak. Standardized skin preparation performed by registered nurses using sterilized instruments should be emphasized.

Concepts: Pneumonia, Surgery, Tertiary referral hospital, Enterobacteria, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Shaving, Razor, Barber

0

Background. An outbreak of PVL-positive MSSA skin and soft tissue-infections (SSTIs) was suspected in May 2010 when recurrent SSTI was diagnosed in an inmate of a large prison in Nantes, France. Methods and findings. Retrospective and prospective investigations were performed. Microbiological characterisation was by DNA microarray testing (S. aureus genotyping - Identibac, Alere). We identified 14 inmates meeting our clinical and microbiological case definition for PVL-MSSA SSTI between March 2010 and April 2011. The SSTIs developed in tattooed areas in 4 patients and in areas shaved daily with a mechanical razor in 4 other patients. All case isolates exhibited a similar SmaI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern. Microarray analysis showed that all 14 isolates harboured genes encoding PVL and enterotoxins (A, H, K, and Q) and belonged to clonal complex 1 (CC1). Individual and collective hygiene measures, education delivered to inmates and prison employees, and antibiotic treatment of SSTIs were successful in controlling the outbreak. No new cases were identified after April 2011. Routine screening for PVL-positive MSSA carriage was not feasible. Conclusions. Our data suggest that tattooing and shaving with mechanical razors may constitute risk factors for SSTIs among previously colonised inmates and contribute to the PVL-MSSA outbreak in the prison. Allowing inmates access to professional tattooists and to the hygiene and safety conditions available to people in the community would help to prevent tattoo-related infections.

Concepts: Staphylococcus aureus, Antibiotic resistance, Staphylococcus, Linezolid, Panton-Valentine leukocidin, Tattoo, Shaving, Razor