SciCombinator

Discover the most talked about and latest scientific content & concepts.

Concept: Programmer

175

Displaying chemical structures in LATEX documents currently requires either hand-coding of the structures using one of several LATEX packages, or the inclusion of finished graphics files produced with an external drawing program. There is currently no software tool available to render the large number of structures available in molfile or SMILES format to LATEX source code. We here present mol2chemfig, a Python program that provides this capability. Its output is written in the syntax defined by the chemfig TEX package, which allows for the flexible and concise description of chemical structures and reaction mechanisms. The program is freely available both through a web interface and for local installation on the user¿s computer. The code and accompanying documentation can be found at http://chimpsky.uwaterloo.ca/mol2chemfig.

Concepts: Computer program, Java, Programming language, Source code, Free software, Computer software, Programmer, Latex

163

We present a web service to access Ensembl data using Representational State Transfer (REST). The Ensembl REST Server enables the easy retrieval of a wide range of Ensembl data by most programming languages, using standard formats such as JSON and FASTA whilst minimising client work. We also introduce bindings to the popular Ensembl Variant Effect Predictor (VEP) tool permitting large-scale programmatic variant analysis independent of any specific programming language. Availability: The Ensembl REST API can be accessed at http://rest.ensembl.org and source code is freely available under an Apache 2.0 license from http://github.com/Ensembl/ensembl-rest.

Concepts: Language, Computer program, Java, C, Programming language, Source code, Programmer, Compiler

59

Software produced for research, published and otherwise, suffers from a number of common problems that make it difficult or impossible to run outside the original institution or even off the primary developer’s computer. We present ten simple rules to make such software robust enough to be run by anyone, anywhere, and thereby delight your users and collaborators.

Concepts: Debut albums, Software engineering, Programmer

33

Bioconductor is an open-source, open-development software project for the analysis and comprehension of high-throughput data in genomics and molecular biology. The project aims to enable interdisciplinary research, collaboration and rapid development of scientific software. Based on the statistical programming language R, Bioconductor comprises 934 interoperable packages contributed by a large, diverse community of scientists. Packages cover a range of bioinformatic and statistical applications. They undergo formal initial review and continuous automated testing. We present an overview for prospective users and contributors.

Concepts: DNA, Gene, Bioinformatics, Molecular biology, Computer program, Programming language, Computer software, Programmer

23

Scratch is a programming environment and an online community where young people can create, share, learn, and communicate. In collaboration with the Scratch Team at MIT, we created a longitudinal dataset of public activity in the Scratch online community during its first five years (2007-2012). The dataset comprises 32 tables with information on more than 1 million Scratch users, nearly 2 million Scratch projects, more than 10 million comments, more than 30 million visits to Scratch projects, and more. To help researchers understand this dataset, and to establish the validity of the data, we also include the source code of every version of the software that operated the website, as well as the software used to generate this dataset. We believe this is the largest and most comprehensive downloadable dataset of youth programming artifacts and communication.

Concepts: Million, Computer program, Youth, Programming language, Source code, Integers, Programmer, 10000000

22

With Next Generation Sequencing data being routinely used, evolutionary biology is transforming into a computational science. Thus, researchers have to rely on a growing number of increasingly complex software. All widely used core tools in the field have grown considerably, in terms of the number of features as well as lines of code and consequently, also with respect to software complexity. A topic that has received little attention is the software engineering quality of widely used core analysis tools. Software developers appear to rarely assess the quality of their code, and this can have potential negative consequences for end-users. To this end, we assessed the code quality of 16 highly cited and compute-intensive tools mainly written in C/C ++ (e.g., MrBayes, MAFFT, SweepFinder etc.) and JAVA (BEAST) from the broader area of evolutionary biology that are being routinely used in current data analysis pipelines. Since, the software engineering quality of the tools we analyzed is rather unsatisfying, we provide a list of best practices for improving the quality of existing tools and list techniques that can be deployed for developing reliable, high quality scientific software from scratch. Finally, we also discuss journal as well as science policy and, more importantly, funding issues that need to be addressed for improving software engineering quality as well as ensuring support for developing new and maintaining existing software. Our intention is to raise the awareness of the community regarding software engineering quality issues and to emphasize the substantial lack of funding for scientific software development.

Concepts: Science, Computer, Computer program, Software engineering, System software, Application software, Programmer, Software developer

5

Consistent and accurate quantification of proteins by mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics depends on the performance of instruments, acquisition methods and data analysis software. In collaboration with the software developers, we evaluated OpenSWATH, SWATH 2.0, Skyline, Spectronaut and DIA-Umpire, five of the most widely used software methods for processing data from sequential window acquisition of all theoretical fragment-ion spectra (SWATH)-MS, which uses data-independent acquisition (DIA) for label-free protein quantification. We analyzed high-complexity test data sets from hybrid proteome samples of defined quantitative composition acquired on two different MS instruments using different SWATH isolation-window setups. For consistent evaluation, we developed LFQbench, an R package, to calculate metrics of precision and accuracy in label-free quantitative MS and report the identification performance, robustness and specificity of each software tool. Our reference data sets enabled developers to improve their software tools. After optimization, all tools provided highly convergent identification and reliable quantification performance, underscoring their robustness for label-free quantitative proteomics.

Concepts: Scientific method, Protein, Proteomics, Computer program, Accuracy and precision, System software, Computer software, Programmer

3

Several decades of research in the field of machine learning have resulted in a multitude of different algorithms for solving a broad range of problems. To tackle a new application, a researcher typically tries to map their problem onto one of these existing methods, often influenced by their familiarity with specific algorithms and by the availability of corresponding software implementations. In this study, we describe an alternative methodology for applying machine learning, in which a bespoke solution is formulated for each new application. The solution is expressed through a compact modelling language, and the corresponding custom machine learning code is then generated automatically. This model-based approach offers several major advantages, including the opportunity to create highly tailored models for specific scenarios, as well as rapid prototyping and comparison of a range of alternative models. Furthermore, newcomers to the field of machine learning do not have to learn about the huge range of traditional methods, but instead can focus their attention on understanding a single modelling environment. In this study, we show how probabilistic graphical models, coupled with efficient inference algorithms, provide a very flexible foundation for model-based machine learning, and we outline a large-scale commercial application of this framework involving tens of millions of users. We also describe the concept of probabilistic programming as a powerful software environment for model-based machine learning, and we discuss a specific probabilistic programming language called Infer.NET, which has been widely used in practical applications.

Concepts: Algorithm, Machine learning, Learning, Computer program, Problem solving, Programming language, Computer programming, Programmer

2

Robust, large-scale sequence analysis is a major challenge in modern genomic science, where biologists are frequently trying to characterise many millions of sequences. Here we describe a new Java-based architecture for the widely-used protein function prediction software package InterProScan. Developments include improvements and additions to the outputs of the software and the complete re-implementation of the software framework, resulting in a flexible and stable system that is able to utilise both multiprocessor machines and/or conventional clusters to achieve scalable distributed data analysis. InterProScan is freely available for download from the EMBl-EBI FTP site and the (open) source code is hosted at Google Code.

Concepts: Series, Data, Sequence, Computer program, Source code, Real analysis, Linux, Programmer

1

Here we present open-source software for the analysis of high-dimensional cytometry data using state of the art algorithms. Importantly, use of the software requires no programming ability, and output files can either be interrogated directly in CymeR or they can be used downstream with any other cytometric data analysis platform. Also, because we use Docker to integrate the multitude of components that form the basis of CymeR, we have additionally developed a proof-of-concept of how future open-source bioinformatic programs with graphical user interfaces could be developed.

Concepts: Data, Computer, Computer program, User interface, Microsoft, Graphical user interface, Sun Microsystems, Programmer