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Concept: Orgasm

271

Sex and disgust are basic, evolutionary relevant functions that are often construed as paradoxical. In general the stimuli involved in sexual encounters are, at least out of context strongly perceived to hold high disgust qualities. Saliva, sweat, semen and body odours are among the strongest disgust elicitors. This results in the intriguing question of how people succeed in having pleasurable sex at all. One possible explanation could be that sexual engagement temporarily reduces the disgust eliciting properties of particular stimuli or that sexual engagement might weaken the hesitation to actually approach these stimuli.

Concepts: Sexual intercourse, Human sexual behavior, Human sexuality, Vagina, Orgasm, Sexual arousal

167

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the efficacy of DA-8031, a novel compound for the treatment of premature ejaculation (PE), we performed in vivo pharmacological studies using 2 preclinical animal models, electrical stimulation of sensory branch of pudendal nerve (SBPdn) and para-chloroamphetamine (PCA)-induced ejaculation model. METHODS: First of all, in electrical stimulation of an SBPdn model, an SBPdn in the pelvic canal of the spinal cord transected from rats was identified. Then an electromyogram (EMG) of the bulbospongiosus (BS) muscle was recorded during electrical stimulation of SBPdn after single intravenous (IV) dosing of DA-8031 and its reference drug, dapoxetine. In the second model, both seminal vesicle pressure (SVP) and the EMG profile of the BS muscle were recorded in PCA-induced ejaculation animals after treated with the same dosing regimen. RESULTS: Area under the curve (AUC) of the BS muscle by EMG wave exhibited a significant reduction in the DA-8031 and dapoxetine 3 mg/kg treated groups, and maximum amplitudes were also significantly decreased in DA-8031 1, 3 mg/kg and dapoxetine 3 mg/kg dose level in the SBPdN stimulation model. Consistent with these findings, in a PCA-induced ejaculation model, SVP increase was significantly inhibited from DA-8031 0.3 mg/kg dose level, and AUC of BS muscle EMG significantly decreased in the DA-8031 1, 3 mg/kg groups. CONCLUSION: The present study implied that DA-8031 contributed to an effective co-coordinated inhibition of the expulsion phase of ejaculation by modulating BS muscle activity and the emission phase through blocking SVP rise. From these findings, DA-8031 is further expected to have clinical efficacy in human studies.

Concepts: Semen, Electromyography, Orgasm, Ejaculation, Penis, Premature ejaculation, Pudendal nerve, Bulbospongiosus muscle

143

In non-azoospermic patients with low semen volume (LSV), looking for partial retrograde ejaculation (PRE) by searching sperm in the postejaculatory urine (PEU) is required. The use of a retro-ejaculatory index (R-ratio) was suggested to define PRE, but none of the studies indicated a specific threshold above which PRE must be considered. Our objective was to propose a threshold value for the R-ratio as indicative of PRE in patients with LSV selected to be devoid of any known causes or risk factors for retrograde ejaculation or LSV. Among our data base (2000-2009) including 632 patients with PEU, 245 male patients from infertile couples who had had a first semen analysis with LSV (< 2mL) and a second semen analysis associated with PEU, were selected on the previous criteria. A prospective control group was randomly constituted (2007-2008) of 162 first consulting male patients from infertile couples, with a normal semen volume (≥ 2mL) on a first semen analysis and who accepted to collect PEU with their usual second semen analysis, selected on the previous criteria. To define an R-ratio threshold indicative of PRE, we used a ROC curve analysis and a regression tree based on a classification and regression tree (CART) algorithm. Of the 245 LSV patients, 146 still presented low semen volume (< 2 mL) on the second semen analysis. From the use of the CART algorithm, two low (1.5% and 2.8%) and two high R-values (7.1% and 8.3%) were defined, according to the lower reference limit for semen volume of 2.0 mL (WHO 1999) or 1.5 mL (WHO 2010) respectively. As only one or no patient with normal semen volume was observed above the two high R-values, we suggest an R-value higher than the range of [7.1-8.3]% as indicative of PRE until confirmation by a prospective multicenter study.

Concepts: Scientific method, Sperm, Semen, Receiver operating characteristic, Orgasm, Ejaculation, Retrograde ejaculation, Anejaculation

143

A 19 year old presented with a progressive decline in ejaculate volume over 2 weeks, followed by a complete absence of ejaculate emission. A post-ejaculatory urine specimen demonstrated spermatozoa confirming a diagnosis of retrograde ejaculation. Investigations revealed a raised blood glucose level of 24.5 mmol/L and HbA1c >15%, with positive tests for anti-GAD antibodies and anti-IA2 antibodies consistent with a diagnosis of Type 1 diabetes mellitus. Retrograde ejaculation in diabetes is associated with autonomic neuropathy and is a late feature of the disease. This case is unique with retrograde ejaculation being the primary presenting symptom of Type 1 diabetes mellitus.

Concepts: Diabetes mellitus, Diabetes, Blood sugar, Semen, Orgasm, Ejaculation, Retrograde ejaculation, Anejaculation

139

To assess the correlation between penile hypersensitivity and premature ejaculation (PE), a total of 420 consecutive subjects attending our andrologic clinic for suspected PE were enrolled. The entire cohort was asked to complete the self-report intravaginal ejaculation latency time (IELT) by stopwatch. According to the IELT, the subjects were classified into 3 groups. Vibratory thresholds were recorded at the glans penis and penile shaft using a biothesiometer. We found that vibratory thresholds in the glans penis and penile shaft were significantly lower in both mild and severe PE group than in the control group (3.81 ± 0.57 and 3.54 ± 0.43 vs 4.73 ± 0.77 for glans penis p = 0.000; 3.64 ± 0.52 and 3.37 ± 0.50 vs 4.62 ± 0.69 for penile shaft p = 0.002). The vibratory threshold decreased as the disease aggravated. In the mild and severe PE groups, a significant positive correlation was detected between the mean values of IELT and the vibratory thresholds. Furthermore, in the receiver operating characteristics curve analysis, the area under the curve of the glans penis and penile shaft vibratory thresholds predicting severe PE were 0.852 and 0.893 respectively. Our study established a dose-dependent association between penile vibratory threshold and PE. Therefore, the vibratory threshold can serve as a potential marker for predicting the severity of PE.

Concepts: Andrology, Receiver operating characteristic, Orgasm, Ejaculation, Penis, Premature ejaculation, Glans penis, Intravaginal ejaculation latency time

91

Traditional factors that once explained men’s sexual difficulties appear insufficient to account for the sharp rise in erectile dysfunction, delayed ejaculation, decreased sexual satisfaction, and diminished libido during partnered sex in men under 40. This review (1) considers data from multiple domains, e.g., clinical, biological (addiction/urology), psychological (sexual conditioning), sociological; and (2) presents a series of clinical reports, all with the aim of proposing a possible direction for future research of this phenomenon. Alterations to the brain’s motivational system are explored as a possible etiology underlying pornography-related sexual dysfunctions. This review also considers evidence that Internet pornography’s unique properties (limitless novelty, potential for easy escalation to more extreme material, video format, etc.) may be potent enough to condition sexual arousal to aspects of Internet pornography use that do not readily transition to real-life partners, such that sex with desired partners may not register as meeting expectations and arousal declines. Clinical reports suggest that terminating Internet pornography use is sometimes sufficient to reverse negative effects, underscoring the need for extensive investigation using methodologies that have subjects remove the variable of Internet pornography use. In the interim, a simple diagnostic protocol for assessing patients with porn-induced sexual dysfunction is put forth.

Concepts: Sexual intercourse, Erectile dysfunction, Orgasm, Penis, Premature ejaculation, Erection, Sexual arousal, Sexual dysfunction

91

Research on multidimensional sexual perfectionism differentiates four forms: self-oriented, partner-oriented, partner-prescribed, and socially prescribed. Self-oriented sexual perfectionism reflects perfectionistic standards people apply to themselves as sexual partners; partner-oriented sexual perfectionism reflects perfectionistic standards people apply to their sexual partner; partner-prescribed sexual perfectionism reflects people’s beliefs that their sexual partner imposes perfectionistic standards on them; and socially prescribed sexual perfectionism reflects people’s beliefs that society imposes such standards on them. Previous studies found partner-prescribed and socially prescribed sexual perfectionism to be maladaptive forms of sexual perfectionism associated with a negative sexual self-concept and problematic sexual behaviors, but only examined cross-sectional relationships. The present article presents the first longitudinal study examining whether multidimensional sexual perfectionism predicts changes in sexual self-concept and sexual function over time. A total of 366 women aged 17-69 years completed measures of multidimensional sexual perfectionism, sexual esteem, sexual anxiety, sexual problem self-blame, and sexual function (cross-sectional data). Three to six months later, 164 of the women completed the same measures again (longitudinal data). Across analyses, partner-prescribed sexual perfectionism emerged as the most maladaptive form of sexual perfectionism. In the cross-sectional data, partner-prescribed sexual perfectionism showed positive relationships with sexual anxiety, sexual problem self-blame, and intercourse pain, and negative relationships with sexual esteem, desire, arousal, lubrication, and orgasmic function. In the longitudinal data, partner-prescribed sexual perfectionism predicted increases in sexual anxiety and decreases in sexual esteem, arousal, and lubrication over time. The findings suggest that partner-prescribed sexual perfectionism contributes to women’s negative sexual self-concept and female sexual dysfunction.

Concepts: Sexual intercourse, Longitudinal study, Cross-sectional study, Sociology, Orgasm, Sexual arousal, Sexual function, Sexual dysfunction

66

During sexual stimulation, some women report the discharge of a noticeable amount of fluid from the urethra, a phenomenon also called “squirting.” To date, both the nature and the origin of squirting remain controversial. In this investigation, we not only analyzed the biochemical nature of the emitted fluid, but also explored the presence of any pelvic liquid collection that could result from sexual arousal and explain a massive fluid emission.

Concepts: Sexual intercourse, Female, Gender, Human sexuality, Orgasm, Penis, Sexual arousal, Sexual stimulation

51

The evolutionary explanation of female orgasm has been difficult to come by. The orgasm in women does not obviously contribute to the reproductive success, and surprisingly unreliably accompanies heterosexual intercourse. Two types of explanations have been proposed: one insisting on extant adaptive roles in reproduction, another explaining female orgasm as a byproduct of selection on male orgasm, which is crucial for sperm transfer. We emphasize that these explanations tend to focus on evidence from human biology and thus address the modification of a trait rather than its evolutionary origin. To trace the trait through evolution requires identifying its homologue in other species, which may have limited similarity with the human trait. Human female orgasm is associated with an endocrine surge similar to the copulatory surges in species with induced ovulation. We suggest that the homolog of human orgasm is the reflex that, ancestrally, induced ovulation. This reflex became superfluous with the evolution of spontaneous ovulation, potentially freeing female orgasm for other roles. This is supported by phylogenetic evidence showing that induced ovulation is ancestral, while spontaneous ovulation is derived within eutherians. In addition, the comparative anatomy of female reproductive tract shows that evolution of spontaneous ovulation is correlated with increasing distance of clitoris from the copulatory canal. In summary, we suggest that the female orgasm-like trait may have been adaptive, however for a different role, namely for inducing ovulation. With the evolution of spontaneous ovulation, orgasm was freed to gain secondary roles, which may explain its maintenance, but not its origin.

Concepts: Reproduction, Female, Biology, Organism, Reproductive system, Human sexuality, Vagina, Orgasm

44

Introduction: Synaesthesia is a phenomenon in which a certain stimulus induces a concurrent sensory perception; it has an estimated prevalence of 4%. Sexual arousal as an inducer for synaesthetic perceptions is rarely mentioned in the literature but can be found sometimes in case reports about subjective orgasmic experiences. Aims: To examine whether synaesthetic perceptions during sexual intercourse have an impact on the sexual experience and the extent of sexual trance compared to non-synaesthetes. Methods: In total, 19 synaesthetes with sexual forms of synaesthesia (17 female; 2 male) were included as well as corresponding control data of 36 non-synaesthetic subjects (n = 55). Two questionnaires were used to assess relevant aspects of sexual function and dysfunction (a German adaption of the Brief Index of Sexual Functioning, KFSP) as well as the occurrence and extent of sexual trance (German version of the Altered States of Consciousness Questionnaire, OAVAV). Additionally qualitative interviews were conducted in some subjects to further explore the nature of sexual experiences in synaesthetes. Main Outcome Measures: Sexual experience and extent of sexual trance during intercourse. Results: Synaesthetes depicted significantly better overall sexual function on the KFSP with increased scores for the subscale “sexual appetence” but coevally significant lower subscale scores for “sexual satisfaction.” Sexual dysfunction was not detected in this sample. Synaesthetes depicted significantly higher levels of the subscales “oceanic boundlessness” and “visionary restructuralization” than controls using the OAVAV. Qualitative interviews revealed varying synaesthetic perceptions during the different states of arousal. Furthermore, synaesthetes reported an unsatisfactory feeling of isolation caused by the idiosyncratic perceptions. Conclusions: Synaesthetes with sexual forms of synaesthesia seem to experience a deeper state of sexual trance without, however, enhanced satisfaction during sexual intercourse.

Concepts: Sexual intercourse, Orgasm, Qualia, Sexuality, Erection, Sexual arousal, Sexual function, Sexual dysfunction