SciCombinator

Discover the most talked about and latest scientific content & concepts.

Concept: Medical tests

212

In the past years, a few methods have been developed to translate human EEG to music. In 2009, PloS One 4 e5915, we developed a method to generate scale-free brainwave music where the amplitude of EEG was translated to music pitch according to the power law followed by both of them, the period of an EEG waveform is translated directly to the duration of a note, and the logarithm of the average power change of EEG is translated to music intensity according to the Fechner’s law. In this work, we proposed to adopt simultaneously-recorded fMRI signal to control the intensity of the EEG music, thus an EEG-fMRI music is generated by combining two different and simultaneous brain signals. And most importantly, this approach further realized power law for music intensity as fMRI signal follows it. Thus the EEG-fMRI music makes a step ahead in reflecting the physiological process of the scale-free brain.

Concepts: Cognitive science, Electroencephalography, Medical tests, Sound, Functional magnetic resonance imaging, Pitch, Weber–Fechner law, Scientific pitch notation

161

Contactless, camera-based photoplethysmography (PPG) interrogates shallower skin layers than conventional contact probes, either transmissive or reflective. This raises questions on the calibratability of camera-based pulse oximetry.

Concepts: Cardiology, Medical tests, Pulse oximeter

142

INTRODUCTION    There are no widely accepted standards of diagnosis of sarcoidosis.  OBJECTIVES    The aim of the study was to assess the relative diagnostic yield of endobronchial ultrasound needle aspiration (EBUS-NA) and endoscopic ultrasound needle aspiration (EUS-NA), and to compare them with the standard diagnostic techniques, i.e. endobronchial biopsy (EBB), transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB), transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA) and mediastinoscopy.  PATIENTS AND METHODS    A prospective randomized study including consecutive patients with clinical diagnosis of stage I or II sarcoidosis. In all patients EBB, TBLB and TBNA were performed initially. Subsequently, patients were randomized to group A (EBUS-NA) or group B (EUS-NA). Next, a crossover control test was performed: all patients with negative results in group A underwent EUS- NA and all patients with negative results in the group B underwent EBUS-NA. In case of lack of confirmation of sarcoidosis, mediastinoscopy was performed. RESULTS    There were 106 patients enrolled, and 100 were available for the final analysis. Overall sensitivity and accuracy of standard endoscopic methods were both 64%. When analyzing each of the standard endoscopic methods separately, diagnosis was confirmed with EBB in 12 patients (12%), TBLB in 42 patients (42%) and TBNA in 44 patients (44%). The accuracy and sensitivity of each endosonography technique was statistically significantly higher than that of EBB+TBLB+TBNA (P = 0.0112 and 0.0134).  CONCLUSIONS    Sensitivity and accuracy of EBUS-NA and EUS-NA are significantly higher than the standard endoscopic methods (P <0.01). Sensitivity and accuracy of EUS-NA is higher than EBUS-NA, but the difference is not statistically significant.

Concepts: Statistics, Biopsy, Pathology, Type I and type II errors, Medical tests, Standardization, Biostatistics, Statistical theory

106

Brain-computer interface (BCI) technologies aim to provide a bridge between the human brain and external devices. Prior research using non-invasive BCI to control virtual objects, such as computer cursors and virtual helicopters, and real-world objects, such as wheelchairs and quadcopters, has demonstrated the promise of BCI technologies. However, controlling a robotic arm to complete reach-and-grasp tasks efficiently using non-invasive BCI has yet to be shown. In this study, we found that a group of 13 human subjects could willingly modulate brain activity to control a robotic arm with high accuracy for performing tasks requiring multiple degrees of freedom by combination of two sequential low dimensional controls. Subjects were able to effectively control reaching of the robotic arm through modulation of their brain rhythms within the span of only a few training sessions and maintained the ability to control the robotic arm over multiple months. Our results demonstrate the viability of human operation of prosthetic limbs using non-invasive BCI technology.

Concepts: Brain, Human brain, Electroencephalography, Cerebellum, Medical tests, Robotics, Magnetoencephalography

104

Next generation sequencing tests (NGS) are usually performed on relatively small core biopsy or fine needle aspiration (FNA) samples. Data is limited on what amount of tumor by volume or minimum number of FNA passes are needed to yield sufficient material for running NGS. We sought to identify the amount of tumor for running the PCDx NGS platform.

Concepts: Biopsy, Pathology, Medical tests, Needle aspiration biopsy

100

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is currently incurable, but there is general agreement that a minimally invasive blood biomarker for screening in preclinical stages would be crucial for future therapy. Diagnostic tools for detection of AD are either invasive like cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers or expensive such as positron emission tomography (PET) scanning. Here, we determine the secondary structure change of amyloid-β (Aβ) in human blood. This change used as blood amyloid biomarker indicates prodromal AD and correlates with CSF AD biomarkers and amyloid PET imaging in the cross-sectional BioFINDER cohort. In a further population-based longitudinal cohort (ESTHER), the blood biomarker detected AD several years before clinical diagnosis in baseline samples with a positive likelihood ratio of 7.9; that is, those who were diagnosed with AD over the years were 7.9 times more likely to test positive. This assay may open avenues for blood screening of early AD stages as a funnel for further more invasive and expensive tests.

Concepts: Alzheimer's disease, Medical imaging, Positron emission tomography, Neuroimaging, Positron, Medical tests, Positron emission, Fluorine-18

42

These updated guidelines on the management of abnormal liver blood tests have been commissioned by the Clinical Services and Standards Committee (CSSC) of the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) under the auspices of the liver section of the BSG. The original guidelines, which this document supersedes, were written in 2000 and have undergone extensive revision by members of the Guidelines Development Group (GDG). The GDG comprises representatives from patient/carer groups (British Liver Trust, Liver4life, PBC Foundation and PSC Support), elected members of the BSG liver section (including representatives from Scotland and Wales), British Association for the Study of the Liver (BASL), Specialist Advisory Committee in Clinical Biochemistry/Royal College of Pathology and Association for Clinical Biochemistry, British Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (BSPGHAN), Public Health England (implementation and screening), Royal College of General Practice, British Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiologists (BSGAR) and Society of Acute Medicine. The quality of evidence and grading of recommendations was appraised using the AGREE II tool. These guidelines deal specifically with the management of abnormal liver blood tests in children and adults in both primary and secondary care under the following subheadings: (1) What constitutes an abnormal liver blood test? (2) What constitutes a standard liver blood test panel? (3) When should liver blood tests be checked? (4) Does the extent and duration of abnormal liver blood tests determine subsequent investigation? (5) Response to abnormal liver blood tests. They are not designed to deal with the management of the underlying liver disease.

Concepts: Medicine, Blood, Liver, Liver function tests, Hepatology, Medical tests, Medical test, Blood test

38

To evaluate the ability of the Decipher genomic classifier in predicting metastasis from analysis of prostate needle biopsy diagnostic tumor tissue specimens.

Concepts: Cancer, Prostate cancer, Greek loanwords, Medical tests

30

Electroencephalographic (EEG) neurofeedback training has been shown to produce plastic modulations in salience network and default mode network functional connectivity in healthy individuals. In this study, we investigated whether a single session of neurofeedback training aimed at the voluntary reduction of alpha rhythm (8-12 Hz) amplitude would be related to differences in EEG network oscillations, functional MRI (fMRI) connectivity, and subjective measures of state anxiety and arousal in a group of individuals with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Concepts: Anxiety, Cognitive science, Electroencephalography, Medical tests, Posttraumatic stress disorder, Schizophrenia, Functional magnetic resonance imaging, Neurofeedback

28

To determine the degree of variation in the handling of prostate needle biopsies (PBNx) in laboratories across Europe.

Concepts: Cancer, Biopsy, Pathology, University, Medical tests, Needle aspiration biopsy