SciCombinator

Discover the most talked about and latest scientific content & concepts.

Concept: Leadership

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Exploiting a randomized natural experiment in India, we show that female leadership influences adolescent girls' career aspirations and educational attainment. A 1993 law reserved leadership positions for women in randomly selected village councils. Using 8453 surveys of adolescents aged 11 to 15 and their parents in 495 villages, we found that, relative to villages in which such positions were never reserved, the gender gap in aspirations closed by 20% in parents and 32% in adolescents in villages assigned a female leader for two election cycles. The gender gap in adolescent educational attainment was erased, and girls spent less time on household chores. We found no evidence of changes in young women’s labor market opportunities, which suggests that the impact of women leaders primarily reflects a role model effect.

Concepts: Female, Gender, Sociology, Randomness, Leadership, Woman, Village, Home

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An urgent need in American health care is improving quality and efficiency while controlling costs. One promising management approach implemented by some leading health care institutions is Lean, a quality improvement philosophy and set of principles originated by the Toyota Motor Company. Health care cases reveal that Lean is as applicable in complex knowledge work as it is in assembly-line manufacturing. When well executed, Lean transforms how an organization works and creates an insatiable quest for improvement. In this article, we define Lean and present 6 principles that constitute the essential dynamic of Lean management: attitude of continuous improvement, value creation, unity of purpose, respect for front-line workers, visual tracking, and flexible regimentation. Health care case studies illustrate each principle. The goal of this article is to provide a template for health care leaders to use in considering the implementation of the Lean management system or in assessing the current state of implementation in their organizations.

Concepts: Health care, Management, Leadership, Lean manufacturing, Toyota Production System, Hybrid electric vehicle, Toyota, Toyota Racing

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Affective presence is a novel personality construct that describes the tendency of individuals to make their interaction partners feel similarly positive or negative. We adopt this construct, together with the input-process-output model of teamwork, to understand how team leaders influence team interaction and innovation performance. In 2 multisource studies, based on 350 individuals working in 87 teams of 2 public organizations and 734 individuals working in 69 teams of a private organization, we tested and supported hypotheses that team leader positive affective presence was positively related to team information sharing, whereas team leader negative affective presence was negatively related to the same team process. In turn, team information sharing was positively related to team innovation, mediating the effects of leader affective presence on this team output. The results indicate the value of adopting an interpersonal individual differences approach to understanding how affect-related characteristics of leaders influence interaction processes and complex performance in teams. (PsycINFO Database Record

Concepts: Understanding, Sociology, Management, Adoption, Leadership, Individual, Team, Social influence

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Background: Understanding the influence of stress on human performance is of theoretical and practical importance. An individual’s reaction to stress predicts their subsequent performance; with a ‘challenge’ response to stress leading to better performance than a ‘threat’ response. However, this contention has not been tested in truly stressful environments with highly skilled individuals. Furthermore, the effect of challenge and threat responses on attentional control during visuomotor tasks is poorly understood.Design: Thus, this study aimed to examine individual reactions to stress, and their influence on attentional control, among a cohort of commercial pilots performing a stressful flight assessment.Methods: Sixteen pilots performed an ‘engine failure on take-off’ scenario, in a high-fidelity flight simulator. Reactions to stress were indexed via self-report; performance was assessed subjectively (flight instructor assessment) and objectively (simulator metrics); gaze behaviour data were captured using a mobile eye tracker, and measures of attentional control were subsequently calculated (search rate, stimulus driven attention, and entropy).Results: Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that a threat response was associated with poorer performance and disrupted attentional control.Conclusion: The findings add to previous research showing that individual reactions to stress influence performance, and shed light on the processes through which stress influences performance.

Concepts: Scientific method, Regression analysis, Poverty, Force, Performance, Leadership, Performing arts, Flight training

29

Abstract Although coaches and players recognise the importance of leaders within the team, research on athlete leadership is sparse. The present study expands knowledge of athlete leadership by extending the current leadership classification and exploring the importance of the team captain as formal leader of the team. An online survey was completed by 4,451 participants (31% females and 69% males) within nine different team sports in Flanders (Belgium). Players (N = 3,193) and coaches (N = 1,258) participated on all different levels in their sports. Results revealed that the proposed additional role of motivational leader was perceived as clearly distinct from the already established roles (task, social and external leader). Furthermore, almost half of the participants (44%) did not perceive their captain as the principal leader on any of the four roles. These findings underline the fact that the leadership qualities attributed to the captain as the team’s formal leader are overrated. It can be concluded that leadership is spread throughout the team; informal leaders rather than the captain take the lead, both on and off the field.

Concepts: Management, Leadership, Coaching, Fiedler contingency model

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In this research we integrate resource allocation and social exchange perspectives to build and test theory focusing on the moderating role of time management skill in the nonmonotonic relationship between organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) and task performance. Results from matching survey data collected from 212 employees and 41 supervisors and from task performance metrics collected several months later indicate that the curvilinear association between OCB and task performance is significantly moderated by employees' time management skill. Implications for theory and practice are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record © 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

Concepts: Management, Leadership, Organization, All rights reserved, Time management

28

Frontline managers in health care are the keepers of culture, the gateway to evoking a grass roots intelligence network, and they hold a pivotal role in advancing innovation at the point of care. Their roles are ever expanding and include knowledge and skills in managing the business, leading the people, and advancing their own leadership development. In all 3 areas, the impact of their leadership exponentially increases if they maximize innovative thinking and action. Health care executives need to establish the expectations for an innovative culture and the role of frontline managers. They must model the behaviors they promote and take the time to develop these frontline managers who are the hub for innovative success in the organization. This article offers insights and practical applications while exploring the innovation keystones of the following: creating an organizational culture of innovation, igniting collaboration that fuels diverse thinking and creativity, utilizing meaningful data to drive innovative decisions, and assessing and monitoring the ongoing climate and outcomes of innovation.

Concepts: Health care, Management, Leadership, Organization, Creativity, Innovation, Invention, Organizational studies and human resource management

28

Effective leadership is critical for optimizing cost, access, and quality in health care. Creating a pipeline of effective health care leaders requires developing leadership competencies that differ from the usual criteria of clinical and scientific excellence by which physicians have traditionally been promoted to leadership positions. Specific competencies that differentiate effective leaders from average leaders, especially emotional intelligence and its component abilities, are essential for effective leadership.Adopting a long-standing practice from successful corporations, some health care institutions, medical societies, and business schools now offer leadership programs that address these differentiating leadership competencies. The author draws on experience with such programs through the Cleveland Clinic Academy to provide recommendations for health care leadership training and to identify unanswered questions about such programs.The author recommends that such training should be broadly available to all health care leadership communities (i.e., nurses, administrators, and physicians). A progressive curriculum, starting with foundational concepts and extending to coaching and feedback opportunities through experiential learning, recognizes the challenge of becoming an effective leader and the long time line needed to do so. Linking leadership courses to continuing medical education and to graduate credit opportunities is appealing to participants. Other recommendations focus on the importance of current leaders' involvement in nominating emerging leaders for participation, embedding leadership development discussions in faculty’s professional reviews, and blending discussion of frameworks and theory with practical, experiential lessons. The author identifies questions about the benefits of formal health care leadership training that remain to be answered.

Concepts: Health care, Medicine, Clinical trial, Skill, Management, Positive psychology, Leadership, Leadership development

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This department highlights change management strategies that may be successful in strategically planning and executing organizational change initiatives. With the goal of presenting practical approaches helpful to nurse leaders advancing organizational change, content includes evidence-based projects, tools, and resources that mobilize and sustain organizational change initiatives. In this article, the author explores personal resilience as an important individual characteristic that affects team functioning and thus organizational adaptability to change. The important role of resilience in strategic leadership for change is presented along with suggestions for evaluating and developing resilience.

Concepts: Management, Strategic management, Positive psychology, Leadership, Strategy, Project management, Planning, Plan

27

Judgments of leadership ability from face images predict the outcomes of actual political elections and are correlated with leadership success in the corporate world. The specific facial cues that people use to judge leadership remain unclear, however. Physical height is also associated with political and organizational success, raising the possibility that facial cues of height contribute to leadership perceptions. Consequently, we assessed whether cues to height exist in the face and, if so, whether they are associated with perception of leadership ability. We found that facial cues to perceived height had a strong relationship with perceived leadership ability. Furthermore, when allowed to manually manipulate faces, participants increased facial cues associated with perceived height in order to maximize leadership perception. A morphometric analysis of face shape revealed that structural facial masculinity was not responsible for the relationship between perceived height and perceived leadership ability. Given the prominence of facial appearance in making social judgments, facial cues to perceived height may have a significant influence on leadership selection.

Concepts: Perception, Sense, Mind, Leadership, Face, Faces, Philosophy of perception, Concepts in aesthetics