SciCombinator

Discover the most talked about and latest scientific content & concepts.

Concept: Knee replacement

135

Background More than 670,000 total knee replacements are performed annually in the United States; however, high-quality evidence to support the effectiveness of the procedure, as compared with nonsurgical interventions, is lacking. Methods In this randomized, controlled trial, we enrolled 100 patients with moderate-to-severe knee osteoarthritis who were eligible for unilateral total knee replacement. Patients were randomly assigned to undergo total knee replacement followed by 12 weeks of nonsurgical treatment (total-knee-replacement group) or to receive only the 12 weeks of nonsurgical treatment (nonsurgical-treatment group), which was delivered by physiotherapists and dietitians and consisted of exercise, education, dietary advice, use of insoles, and pain medication. The primary outcome was the change from baseline to 12 months in the mean score on four Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score subscales, covering pain, symptoms, activities of daily living, and quality of life (KOOS4); scores range from 0 (worst) to 100 (best). Results A total of 95 patients completed the 12-month follow-up assessment. In the nonsurgical-treatment group, 13 patients (26%) underwent total knee replacement before the 12-month follow-up; in the total-knee-replacement group, 1 patient (2%) received only nonsurgical treatment. In the intention-to-treat analysis, the total-knee-replacement group had greater improvement in the KOOS4 score than did the nonsurgical-treatment group (32.5 vs. 16.0; adjusted mean difference, 15.8 [95% confidence interval, 10.0 to 21.5]). The total-knee-replacement group had a higher number of serious adverse events than did the nonsurgical-treatment group (24 vs. 6, P=0.005). Conclusions In patients with knee osteoarthritis who were eligible for unilateral total knee replacement, treatment with total knee replacement followed by nonsurgical treatment resulted in greater pain relief and functional improvement after 12 months than did nonsurgical treatment alone. However, total knee replacement was associated with a higher number of serious adverse events than was nonsurgical treatment, and most patients who were assigned to receive nonsurgical treatment alone did not undergo total knee replacement before the 12-month follow-up. (Funded by the Obel Family Foundation and others; MEDIC ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01410409 .).

Concepts: Clinical trial, Randomized controlled trial, United States, Pain, Randomness, Knee replacement, Adverse event, Replacements

91

Background Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy is one of the most common orthopedic procedures, yet rigorous evidence of its efficacy is lacking. Methods We conducted a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled trial in 146 patients 35 to 65 years of age who had knee symptoms consistent with a degenerative medial meniscus tear and no knee osteoarthritis. Patients were randomly assigned to arthroscopic partial meniscectomy or sham surgery. The primary outcomes were changes in the Lysholm and Western Ontario Meniscal Evaluation Tool (WOMET) scores (each ranging from 0 to 100, with lower scores indicating more severe symptoms) and in knee pain after exercise (rated on a scale from 0 to 10, with 0 denoting no pain) at 12 months after the procedure. Results In the intention-to-treat analysis, there were no significant between-group differences in the change from baseline to 12 months in any primary outcome. The mean changes (improvements) in the primary outcome measures were as follows: Lysholm score, 21.7 points in the partial-meniscectomy group as compared with 23.3 points in the sham-surgery group (between-group difference, -1.6 points; 95% confidence interval [CI], -7.2 to 4.0); WOMET score, 24.6 and 27.1 points, respectively (between-group difference, -2.5 points; 95% CI, -9.2 to 4.1); and score for knee pain after exercise, 3.1 and 3.3 points, respectively (between-group difference, -0.1; 95% CI, -0.9 to 0.7). There were no significant differences between groups in the number of patients who required subsequent knee surgery (two in the partial-meniscectomy group and five in the sham-surgery group) or serious adverse events (one and zero, respectively). Conclusions In this trial involving patients without knee osteoarthritis but with symptoms of a degenerative medial meniscus tear, the outcomes after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy were no better than those after a sham surgical procedure. (Funded by the Sigrid Juselius Foundation and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00549172 .).

Concepts: Medicine, Surgery, Knee, Anesthesia, Orthopedic surgery, Knee replacement, Arthroscopy, Tear of meniscus

84

The term parachute trial entered the medical lexicon to depict studies of treatments everyone already assumes to be effective. (In other words, do we need a trial to show that parachutes save the lives of persons who jump from airplanes?(1)) The parachute trial has been invoked to decry randomized trials of total joint replacement as senseless. After all, joint replacements are among the most significant advances of the 20th century; don’t we already know they are successful? Nearly 1 million elective total knee and hip replacements are performed annually in the United States; rates of total knee replacement tripled . . .

Concepts: United States, Osteoarthritis, Hip replacement, Orthopedic surgery, 20th century, Joints, Knee replacement, Autologous chondrocyte implantation

34

To determine the prevalence of knee pain, radiographic knee osteoarthritis (RKOA), total knee replacement (TKR) and associated risk factors in male ex-professional footballers compared with men in the general population (comparison group).

Concepts: Epidemiology, Rheumatoid arthritis, Osteoarthritis, Orthopedic surgery, Knee replacement, Autologous chondrocyte implantation

28

Wear of total knee polyethylene has been quantified gravimetrically with thickness measurements and evaluation of surface wear modes. However, these techniques do not localize volumetric wear.

Concepts: Knee replacement

28

Patient-specific instrumentation potentially improves surgical precision and decreases operative time in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) but there is little supporting data to confirm this presumption.

Concepts: Knee replacement

28

BackgroundFollowing advice from the Scottish Antimicrobial Prescribing Group, we switched our antibiotic prophylaxis for elective hip and knee replacement surgery from cefuroxime to flucloxacillin with single-dose gentamicin in order to reduce the incidence of Clostridium difficile associated diarrhoea (CDAD). A clinical impression that more patients subsequently developed acute kidney injury (AKI) led us to examine this possibility in more detail.MethodsWe examined the incidence of AKI in 198 consecutive patients undergoing elective hip or knee surgery. These patients were given the following prophylactic antibiotics: cefuroxime (n = 48); then high-dose (HD) flucloxacillin (5-8 g) with single-dose gentamicin (n = 52); then low-dose (LD) flucloxacillin (3-4 g) with single-dose gentamicin (n = 46) and finally cefuroxime again (n = 52).ResultsPatients receiving HD flucloxacillin required more vasopressors during surgery (P = 0.02); otherwise, there were no statistically significant differences in pre- and peri-operative characteristics between the four groups. The proportion of patients with any form of AKI by RIFLE criteria was first cefuroxime (8%), HD flucloxacillin with gentamicin (52%), LD flucloxacillin with gentamicin (22%) and second cefuroxime (14%; P < 0.0001). Odds ratios for AKI derived from a multivariate logistic regression model, adjusted also for sex and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers, with the first cefuroxime group as a reference category were: HD flucloxacillin with gentamicin 14.53 (4.25-49.71); LD flucloxacillin with gentamicin 2.96 (0.81-10.81) and second cefuroxime 2.01 (0.52-7.73). Three patients required temporary haemodialysis. Biopsies in two of these showed acute tubulo-interstitial nephritis. All three patients belonged to the HD flucloxacillin with gentamicin group. None of the patients developed CDAD.ConclusionsWe have shown an association between the prophylactic antibiotic regimen and subsequent development of AKI following primary hip and knee arthroplasty that appeared to be due to the use of HD flucloxacillin with single-dose gentamicin. We found no evidence to suggest that this association was confounded by any of the co-variates we measured.

Concepts: Regression analysis, Kidney, Statistical significance, Acute kidney injury, Antibiotic, Knee replacement, Clostridium difficile, Interstitial nephritis

28

INTRODUCTION: Hyperfibrinolysis is observed during and immediately after major orthopedic surgery. The kinetics and duration of this phase should be defined to adjust the duration of antifibrinolytic treatment with tranexamic acid (TXA). OBJECTIVE: We aimed to quantify the duration of postoperative fibrinolysis and to assess the biological impact of TXA administration. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fourteen patients undergoing total hip replacement (THR) and 10 patients undergoing total knee replacement (TKR) with tourniquet were included in an observational, prospective, single-center study. Among these patients, 7 THR patients and 5 TKR patients received TXA (15mg/kg IV intraoperatively, followed by continuous infusion of 15mg/kg/h until end of surgery, then every 4hours until 16±2hours after surgery). D-dimers, euglobulin lysis time (ELT), and thrombin generation time (TGT) were measured prior to surgery as well as 6, 18 and 24hours (H) after. RESULTS: No significant difference in ELT was observed between the groups. In contrast, D-dimers significantly increased postoperatively in patients not treated with TXA (p<0.001), while such an increase was prevented in patients receiving TXA, as measured at H0, H6, H18 and H24 after THR, and at H6 and H18 after TKR (p<0.001). No significant between-group change in TGT, was observed (peak thrombin and endogenous thrombin potential) all along the study. CONCLUSION: This study shows that fibrinolysis peaked 6hours after end of surgery and maintained about 18hours after surgery, as evidenced by an increase in D-dimers. When administered for up to 16±2hours after surgery, TXA reduced postoperative fibrinolysis.

Concepts: Hip replacement, Orthopedic surgery, Joint replacement, Knee replacement, Polyethylene, Antifibrinolytic, John Charnley

27

Proximal and distal (mid-thigh) ultrasound-guided continuous adductor canal block techniques have been described but not yet compared, and infusion benefits or side effects may be determined by catheter location. We hypothesized that proximal placement will result in faster onset of saphenous nerve anesthesia, without additional motor block, compared to a distal technique.

Concepts: Creativity techniques, Anatomy, Knee replacement, Great saphenous vein, Saphenous nerve, Adductor canal, Adductor hiatus

27

STUDY OBJECTIVE: To determine whether a bolus technique provides enhanced analgesia compared with a continuous infusion for femoral nerve block. DESIGN: Prospective, single-blinded, randomized controlled trial (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01226927). SETTING: Perioperative areas and orthopedic surgical ward of a university hospital. PATIENTS: 45 ASA physical status 1, 2, and 3 patients undergoing unilateral primary total knee arthroplasty. INTERVENTIONS: All patients received single-injection sciatic and femoral nerve blocks plus a femoral nerve catheter placement for postoperative analgesia. Patients were randomly assigned to an automated intermittent bolus (5 mL every 30 min with 0.1 mL/hr basal rate) or a continuous infusion (10.1 mL/hr) delivery method of 0.2% ropivacaine. MEASUREMENTS: Consumption of intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) and visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores were assessed postoperatively at set intervals until the morning of postoperative day (POD) 2. MAIN RESULTS: The mean (SEM) cumulative IV-PCA dose (mg of hydromorphone) for the 36-hour postoperative interval measured was 12.9 ± 2.32 in the continuous infusion rate group (n = 20) and 7.8 ± 1.02 in the intermittent bolus group [n = 21, t(39) = 2.04, P = 0.048; a 39 ± 14% difference in total usage]. Pain scores were statistically significantly lower in the intermittent bolus group in the afternoon of POD 1 (t(39) = 2.47, P = 0.018), but were otherwise similar. CONCLUSIONS: An automated intermittent bolus infusion technique for femoral nerve catheters is associated with clinically and statistically significantly less IV-PCA use (ie, an opioid-sparing effect) than a continuous infusion technique.

Concepts: Pharmacology, Randomized controlled trial, Intravenous therapy, Knee replacement, Catheter, Bolus, Infusion pump, Basal