SciCombinator

Discover the most talked about and latest scientific content & concepts.

Concept: Joints

383

Cracking sounds emitted from human synovial joints have been attributed historically to the sudden collapse of a cavitation bubble formed as articular surfaces are separated. Unfortunately, bubble collapse as the source of joint cracking is inconsistent with many physical phenomena that define the joint cracking phenomenon. Here we present direct evidence from real-time magnetic resonance imaging that the mechanism of joint cracking is related to cavity formation rather than bubble collapse. In this study, ten metacarpophalangeal joints were studied by inserting the finger of interest into a flexible tube tightened around a length of cable used to provide long-axis traction. Before and after traction, static 3D T1-weighted magnetic resonance images were acquired. During traction, rapid cine magnetic resonance images were obtained from the joint midline at a rate of 3.2 frames per second until the cracking event occurred. As traction forces increased, real-time cine magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated rapid cavity inception at the time of joint separation and sound production after which the resulting cavity remained visible. Our results offer direct experimental evidence that joint cracking is associated with cavity inception rather than collapse of a pre-existing bubble. These observations are consistent with tribonucleation, a known process where opposing surfaces resist separation until a critical point where they then separate rapidly creating sustained gas cavities. Observed previously in vitro, this is the first in-vivo macroscopic demonstration of tribonucleation and as such, provides a new theoretical framework to investigate health outcomes associated with joint cracking.

Concepts: Joint, Cracking joints, Cavitation, Phenomenon, Synovial joint, Observation, Magnetic resonance imaging, Joints

330

The articular release of the metacarpophalangeal joint produces a typical cracking sound, resulting in what is commonly referred to as the cracking of knuckles. Despite over sixty years of research, the source of the knuckle cracking sound continues to be debated due to inconclusive experimental evidence as a result of limitations in the temporal resolution of non-invasive physiological imaging techniques. To support the available experimental data and shed light onto the source of the cracking sound, we have developed a mathematical model of the events leading to the generation of the sound. The model resolves the dynamics of a collapsing cavitation bubble in the synovial fluid inside a metacarpophalangeal joint during an articular release. The acoustic signature from the resulting bubble dynamics is shown to be consistent in both magnitude and dominant frequency with experimental measurements in the literature and with our own experiments, thus lending support for cavitation bubble collapse as the source of the cracking sound. Finally, the model also shows that only a partial collapse of the bubble is needed to replicate the experimentally observed acoustic spectra, thus allowing for bubbles to persist following the generation of sound as has been reported in recent experiments.

Concepts: Replicate, Science, Causality, Sound, Sonar, Cavitation, Experiment, Joints

169

PurposeIn this retrospective study we investigated the clinical and radiological outcome after operative treatment of acute Rockwood III-V injuries of the AC-joint using two acromioclavicular (AC) cerclages and one coracoclavicular (CC) cerclage with resorbable sutures. METHODS: Between 2007 and 2009 a total of 39 patients fit the inclusion criteria after operative treatment of acute AC joint dislocation. All patients underwent open reduction and anatomic reconstruction of the AC and CC-ligaments using PDS® sutures (Polydioxane, Ethicon, Norderstedt, Germany). Thirty-three patients could be investigated at a mean follow up of 32+/-9 months (range 24–56 months). RESULTS: The mean Constant score was 94.3+/-7.1 (range 73–100) with an age and gender correlated score of 104.2%+/-6.9 (88-123%). The DASH score (mean 3.46+/-6.6 points), the ASES score (94.6+/-9.7points) and the Visual Analogue Scale (mean 0.5+/-0,6) revealed a good to excellent clinical outcome. The difference in the coracoclavicular distance compared to the contralateral side was <5 mm for 28 patients, between 5-10 mm for 4 patients, and more than 10 mm for another patient. In the axial view, the anterior border of the clavicle was within 1 cm (ventral-dorsal direction) of the anterior rim of the acromion in 28 patients (85%). Re-dislocations occured in three patients (9%). CONCLUSION: Open AC joint reconstruction using AC and CC PDS cerclages provides good to excellent clinical results in the majority of cases. However, radiographically, the CC distance increased significantly at final follow up, but neither the amount of re-dislocation nor calcifications of the CC ligaments or osteoarthritis of the AC joint had significant influence on the outcome.Level of evidenceCase series, Level IV.

Concepts: Joint, Acromioclavicular joint, Osteoarthritis, Ligament, Acromion, Joints, Clavicle, Joint dislocation

137

Sacroiliac (SI) joint pain is an under diagnosed source of low back pain due in part to lack of visible pathology on radiographs and symptoms mimicking other back-related disorders. Open SI joint fusion has been performed since the 1920s. This technique has fallen out of favor with the introduction of minimally invasive options. To date there has been no direct comparison between open and MIS SI joint fusion.

Concepts: Back pain, Joints, Symptoms, Joint, Sacroiliac joint, Low back pain

84

A pooled patient-level analysis of two multicenter randomized controlled trials and one multicenter single-arm prospective trial.

Concepts: ClinicalTrials.gov, Joints, Minimally invasive, Sacroiliac joint, Joint, Randomized controlled trial

84

The term parachute trial entered the medical lexicon to depict studies of treatments everyone already assumes to be effective. (In other words, do we need a trial to show that parachutes save the lives of persons who jump from airplanes?(1)) The parachute trial has been invoked to decry randomized trials of total joint replacement as senseless. After all, joint replacements are among the most significant advances of the 20th century; don’t we already know they are successful? Nearly 1 million elective total knee and hip replacements are performed annually in the United States; rates of total knee replacement tripled . . .

Concepts: Osteoarthritis, Joints, Autologous chondrocyte implantation, Hip replacement, Orthopedic surgery, United States, 20th century, Knee replacement

81

Here we show that novel, energy-recycling stairs reduce the amount of work required for humans to both ascend and descend stairs. Our low-power, interactive, and modular steps can be placed on existing staircases, storing energy during stair descent and returning that energy to the user during stair ascent. Energy is recycled through event-triggered latching and unlatching of passive springs without the use of powered actuators. When ascending the energy-recycling stairs, naive users generated 17.4 ± 6.9% less positive work with their leading legs compared to conventional stairs, with the knee joint positive work reduced by 37.7 ± 10.5%. Users also generated 21.9 ± 17.8% less negative work with their trailing legs during stair descent, with ankle joint negative work reduced by 26.0 ± 15.9%. Our low-power energy-recycling stairs have the potential to assist people with mobility impairments during stair negotiation on existing staircases.

Concepts: Human anatomy, Human leg, Joint, Knee, Joints, Stairway, Energy, Potential energy

71

Carrying load alters normal walking, imposes additional stress to the musculoskeletal system, and results in an increase in energy consumption and a consequent earlier onset of fatigue. This phenomenon is largely due to increased work requirements in lower extremity joints, in turn requiring higher muscle activation. The aim of this work was to assess the biomechanical and physiological effects of a multi-joint soft exosuit that applies assistive torques to the biological hip and ankle joints during loaded walking.

Concepts: Classical mechanics, Joule, Joints, Human anatomy, Anatomy, Energy, Force

35

Quality improvement initiatives combined with pulsed xenon ultraviolet room disinfection were implemented to reduce surgical site infections (SSIs) in patients undergoing total joint procedures. After 12 months, knee SSIs were reduced from 4 to 0 (P = .03) and hip SSIs were reduced from 3 to 0 (P = .15) for a combined prevention of 7 SSIs (P = .01) and a savings of $290,990.

Concepts: Joints, Hydrogen peroxide, Hydrogen, Synovial joint, Infection, Infectious disease, Antiseptic, Joint

31

This article focuses on the (functional) anatomy and biomechanics of the pelvic girdle and specifically the sacroiliac joints (SIJs). The SIJs are essential for effective load transfer between the spine and legs. The sacrum, pelvis and spine, and the connections to the arms, legs and head, are functionally interrelated through muscular, fascial and ligamentous interconnections. A historical overview is presented on pelvic and especially SIJ research, followed by a general functional anatomical overview of the pelvis. In specific sections, the development and maturation of the SIJ is discussed, and a description of the bony anatomy and sexual morphism of the pelvis and SIJ is debated. The literature on the SIJ ligaments and innervation is discussed, followed by a section on the pathology of the SIJ. Pelvic movement studies are investigated and biomechanical models for SIJ stability analyzed, including examples of insufficient versus excessive sacroiliac force closure.

Concepts: Sacrum, Joints, Human anatomy, Joint, Pelvis, Sacroiliac joint