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Concept: Institute for Scientific Information

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Since the establishment of the academic society in 1972, Korean allergists have made continuous efforts to elucidate pathogenic mechanisms and therapeutic advances for allergic diseases. The present study aimed to summarize recent progress and explore future prospects of research performance by Korean allergists. We performed a comprehensive bibliometric analysis for research papers published in the Science Citation Index (SCI) or SCI-expanded journals by Korean allergists between 2009 and 2013. Research performance was quantitatively analyzed for the numbers of papers by publication year, research type, and main topic. In addition, the performance was also examined for qualitative indices, such as impact factor and citation number. A total of 1,091 papers were identified. The number of publication increased continuously, with an annual increase rate of 12.3%. Clinical and basic studies were the most frequent types of research, and recently the number of epidemiological studies has increased. By research topic, asthma was the most commonly studied, accounting for 20.9% of the total number of publications. Notably, the amount of rhinitis/rhinosinusitis research has risen steeply in 2013. Qualitative analyses also indicated continuous progress; the median impact factor of published journals increased from 1.918 in 2009 to 2.746 in 2013, yielding an annual increase rate of 7.4%. In conclusion, the present analyses identified a continuous increase in the research performance of Korean allergists over a recent 5 year period (2009-2013), both quantitatively and qualitatively. A more significant contribution is expected in the forthcoming era.

Concepts: Scientific method, Academic publishing, Qualitative research, Impact factor, Publishing, Science Citation Index, Bibliometrics, Institute for Scientific Information

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An important attribute of the traditional impact factor was the controversial 2-year citation window. So far, several scholars have proposed using different citation time windows for evaluating journals. However, there is no confirmation whether a longer citation time window would be better. How did the journal evaluation effects of 3IF, 4IF, and 6IF comparing with 2IF and 5IF? In order to understand these questions, we made a comparative study of impact factors with different citation time windows with the peer-reviewed scores of ophthalmologic journals indexed by Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE) database.

Concepts: Scientific method, Academic publishing, Science, Nature, Impact factor, Scientific journal, Bibliometrics, Institute for Scientific Information

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The American Journal of Occupational Therapy (AJOT) had a successful 2015. From September 2014 to September 2015, the number of manuscripts submitted had increased by 35%. Manuscripts were received from 23 countries, compared with 17 countries in 2014. AJOT continues to have the highest impact factor and to be the highest ranked of the occupational therapy journals listed in Journal Citation Reports. AJOT continues to focus on publishing research articles on aspects of occupational therapy among varied populations with diverse acute and chronic conditions. Additional changes for 2015 include new associate editors, a significantly enlarged pool of reviewers from across the globe, continuous publishing, pay-per-view, updated author guidelines, and the adoption of clinical trial registration requirements effective January 1, 2016.

Concepts: Medicine, Clinical trial, Academic publishing, Impact factor, Institute for Scientific Information, Journal Citation Reports

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Social capital is a neglected determinant of health in low and middle income countries. To date, majority of evidence syntheses on social capital and health are based upon high income countries. We conducted this systematic review to identify the methods used to measure social capital in low and middle-income countries and to evaluate their relative strengths and weaknesses. An electronic search was conducted using Pubmed, Science citation index expanded, Social science citation index expanded, Web of knowledge, Cochrane, Trip, Google scholar and selected grey literature sources. We aimed to include all studies conducted in low and middle-income countries, published in English that have measured any aspect of social capital in relation to health in the study, from 1980 to January 2013. We extracted data using a data extraction form and performed narrative synthesis as the measures were heterogeneous. Of the 472 articles retrieved, 46 articles were selected for the review. The review included 32 studies from middle income countries and seven studies from low income countries. Seven were cross national studies. Most studies were descriptive cross sectional in design (n = 39). Only two randomized controlled trials were included. Among the studies conducted using primary data (n = 32), we identified18 purposely built tools that measured various dimensions of social capital. Validity (n = 11) and reliability (n = 8) of the tools were assessed only in very few studies. Cognitive constructs of social capital, namely trust, social cohesion and sense of belonging had a positive association towards measured health outcome in majority of the studies. While most studies measured social capital at individual/micro level (n = 32), group level measurements were obtained by aggregation of individual measures. As many tools originate in high income contexts, cultural adaptation, validation and reliability assessment is mandatory in adapting the tool to the study setting. Evidence on causality and assessing predictive validity is a problem due to the scarcity of prospective study designs. We recommend Harpham et al. s' Adapted Social Capital Assessment Tool (A-SCAT), Hurtado et al. s' six item tool and Elgar et al. s' World Value Survey Social Capital Scale for assessment of social capital in low and middle income countries.

Concepts: Randomized controlled trial, Sociology, Psychometrics, Income, Science Citation Index, Citation index, Institute for Scientific Information, Stock and flow

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The editors of Revista Clínica Española(Rev Clin Esp) inform on their editorial activity during the last 12 months: (a) Objectives and attainments in 2014, (b) Editorial activity, 2014, and © 2013 impact factor. In 2014 we achieved the 5 planned objectives. We have published the 9 programmed issues and 103% of the planned papers according to the usual fixed sections. We emphasize the publication of 29 editorials, 21 of which are signed by prestigious foreign authors. From the first January to the 30th September 2014 we received 421 manuscripts (46.8 manuscripts per month), a slight lower figure to that obtained in 2013 (50.9 manuscripts per month). The acceptance rate of the 404 manuscripts whose editorial process has been concluded was 32.3% (originals, 22.4%). We asked for 315 revisions to 240 reviewers and we received 53.3% revisions in less than two weeks (10.4 days). The mean time to adopt an editorial decision for all manuscripts («accepted»/«rejected») has been 18,3 (less than half than in 2009). For «originals» this figure has dropped from 56,6 days in 2009 to 26.6 days in 2014. The mean time elapsed from manuscript reception to its on-line publication was 103 days. In 2014 the collaboration with the working groups from the Internal Medicine Spanish Foundation (FEMI) has reported 11 published manuscripts. In July 2014 we were informed that the Journal Citation Reports gave Rev Clin Esp an Impact Factor of 1,314 (year 2013). This Impact Factor without self-citations would have been 0.705 (in 2009 the global impact factor was 0,584). With the Editorial Committee farewell we welcome the new editorial team and we sincerely thank the SEMI Steering Committee, our colleagues, journal officers, reviewers, readers and authors that since 2009 have trusted on our editorial work.

Concepts: Academic publishing, Impact factor, Newspaper, Bibliometrics, Institute for Scientific Information, Journal Citation Reports, Editors, Editorial

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We assessed the relationship between the size of the 39 Journal Citation Reports (JCR) medical categories and impact factor (IF) of journals in these categories, and the implications that it might have for emergency medicine (EM) journals.

Concepts: Academic publishing, Impact factor, Bibliometrics, Institute for Scientific Information, Journal Citation Reports

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Turkey’s institutions in cardiovascular medicine were evaluated regarding publication output in 2013 based on data available in the Web of Science. Only articles in full-text and reviews appearing in source publications covered by the Science Citation Index proper were included. A fractional count system was used for items published jointly with a foreign or a non-cardiological Turkish institution. Turkey’s publications increased numerically to 268, and its global share from 4.3 to 6.0 per mille, yet only to the level of 2001. Articles originating from adult cardiology numbered 188 (70%), while cardiovascular surgery and pediatric cardiology contributed 15% each. Three hospitals affiliated with the Ministry of Health (Kartal Koşuyolu, M. Akif Ersoy and Türkiye Yüksek İhtisas Hastanesi) and the cardiology departments of the medical faculties of Başkent, Hacettepe and Ege Universities ranked highest, each generating 7-15 papers. The median impact factor remained similar to the preceding year, at 1.52 (interquartile range 1.20 - 2.31). The undertaking of promotional and supportive measures by the central authorities regarding the conspicuous decline in Turkey’s medical research output is long overdue.

Concepts: Medicine, Interquartile range, Academic publishing, Impact factor, Science Citation Index, Citation index, Institute for Scientific Information, Social Sciences Citation Index

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Introduction. Society of British Neurological Surgeons (SBNS) meetings are important national events which allow for the presentation of current academic work. The publication rate of presented abstracts is considered a proxy marker of the scientific strength of a conference. We aimed to determine the publication fate of presented abstracts at SBNS meetings over a 5-year period. Methods. A retrospective review of SBNS conference proceedings between 2001 and 2005 was performed. To ascertain whether an abstract resulted in peer-reviewed publication, a range of databases (PubMed, Google Scholar, Medline and Ovid) were interrogated. Abstracts published in full were subsequently assessed for journal impact factor (IF), time of publication and number of citations received (per Google Scholar). Results. A total of 494 abstracts were presented. Of these, 181 abstracts were subsequently published in full, giving the conference a publication rate of 36.6%. The mean time to publication from presentation was 22 months (range 35 months pre-presentation to 133 months afterwards). The top three journals for publication were the British Journal of Neurosurgery (23.2%), Neurosurgery (7.7%) and Journal of Neurosurgery (7.7%). The IF of journal destinations ranged from no IF to 38.28 (median = 1.97). Number of citations ranged from 0 to 963 (median = 22). Abstracts with positive results were significantly more likely to be published in full compared to those with negative results (p = 0.0001). Conclusions. SBNS conferences have a respectable publication rate. Those abstracts that are published in full have gone on to gain a considerable number of citations reflecting their scientific relevance. However, studies presented at SBNS are susceptible to positive outcome bias.

Concepts: Academic publishing, Science, Arithmetic mean, Peer review, Nature, Impact factor, Institute for Scientific Information, PageRank

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Background:Toxicology in Malaysia has experienced rapid development and made great progress in education and research in conjunction with economic development in Malaysia over the past two decades.Objectives:The main objectives of this study were to analyse the research originating from Malaysia and published in toxicology journals and to examine the authorship pattern and the citations retrieved from the Scopus database.Methods:Data from 1 January 2003 till 31 December 2012 were searched for documents with specific words in the toxicology field as a ‘source title’ and Malaysia as an affiliation country. Research productivity was evaluated based on a methodology we developed and used in other bibliometric studies by analysing: (a) total and trends of contributions in toxicology fields between 2003 and 2012; (b) Malaysian authorship pattern and productivity; © collaboration patterns; (d) journals in which Malaysian researchers publish; (e) the classification of journals to Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) or non-ISI; (f) impact factors (IFs) of all publications; and (g) citations received by the publications.Results:In total, 290 documents were retrieved from 55 international peer-reviewed toxicology journals. The quantity of publication increased by around 10-fold from 2003 to 2012. The h-index of the retrieved documents was 20. Of the 55 journal titles, 42 (76.4%) have their IF listed in the journal citation reports 2012. Forty-two documents (14.5%) were published in journals that had no official IF. The total number of citations, at the time of manuscript writing (5 August 2013), was 1707, with a median (interquartile range) of 3 (0-7). Malaysia collaborated mostly with countries in the Asia-Pacific regions (18.3%), especially India and Japan, followed by the Middle East and Africa (10.0%), especially Palestine and Yemen.Conclusion:The present data show a promising rise and a good start for toxicology research activity in Malaysia. The sharing of relevant research questions by developed and developing countries can lead to research opportunities in the field of toxicology.

Concepts: Academic publishing, Middle East, Impact factor, Publishing, Arabic language, Bibliometrics, Institute for Scientific Information, Journal Citation Reports

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Diagnostic accuracy studies determine the clinical value of non-invasive cardiac imaging tests. The ‘STAndards for the Reporting of Diagnostic accuracy studies’ (STARD) were published in 2003 to improve the quality of study reporting. We aimed to assess the reporting quality of cardiac computed tomography (CCT), single positron emission computed tomography (SPECT), and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) diagnostic accuracy studies; to evaluate the impact of STARD; and to investigate the relationships between reporting quality, journal impact factor, and study citation index.

Concepts: Medical imaging, Academic publishing, Bibliometrics, Institute for Scientific Information