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Concept: High performance liquid chromatography

174

This paper describes the design of a new instrumental technique, Gas Chromatography Recomposition-Olfactometry (GC-R), that adapts the reconstitution technique used in flavor chemistry studies by extracting volatiles from a sample by headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME), separating the extract on a capillary GC column, and recombining individual compounds selectively as they elute off of the column into a mixture for sensory analysis (Figure 1). Using the chromatogram of a mixture as a map, the GC-R instrument allows the operator to “cut apart” and recombine the components of the mixture at will, selecting compounds, peaks, or sections based on retention time to include or exclude in a reconstitution for sensory analysis. Selective recombination is accomplished with the installation of a Deans Switch directly in-line with the column, which directs compounds either to waste or to a cryotrap at the operator’s discretion. This enables the creation of, for example, aroma reconstitutions incorporating all of the volatiles in a sample, including instrumentally undetectable compounds as well those present at concentrations below sensory thresholds, thus correcting for the “reconstitution discrepancy” sometimes noted in flavor chemistry studies. Using only flowering lavender (Lavandula angustifola ‘Hidcote Blue’) as a source for volatiles, we used the instrument to build mixtures of subsets of lavender volatiles in-instrument and characterized their aroma qualities with a sensory panel. We showed evidence of additive, masking, and synergistic effects in these mixtures and of “lavender' aroma character as an emergent property of specific mixtures. This was accomplished without the need for chemical standards, reductive aroma models, or calculation of Odor Activity Values, and is broadly applicable to any aroma or flavor.

Concepts: Mixture, Chromatography, High performance liquid chromatography, Analytical chemistry, Gas chromatography, Chemical compound, Solid phase microextraction, Separation process

168

OBJECTIVES: To determine the mycophenolic acid pharmacokinetic profile early after transplant in Iranian kidney graft recipients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study was performed during 6 months in 31 patients who recently had kidney transplant and received fixed doses of mycophenolate mofetil (2 g/d). The plasma levels of mycophenolic acid were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. RESULTS: The mean first mycophenolic acid peak level was 10 ± 5 mg/L. The mean mycophenolic acid area under the curve was 26 ± 19 mgh/L and apparent clearance was 57 ± 55 L/h. The mycophenolic acid area under the curve values of only 8 patients (26%) were within the therapeutic range (30-60 mgh/L). The first, second, and third mycophenolic acid peak levels correlated significantly with mycophenolic acid area under the curve (P < .05). Mycophenolic acid concentration at 10 hours had the highest correlation with mycophenolic acid area under the curve (r=0.962; P < .05). No statistically significant differences were evident in the mean mycophenolic acid area under the curve between men and women. CONCLUSIONS: There was a high degree of variation between different patients in mycophenolic acid pharmacokinetics early after kidney transplant.

Concepts: Pharmacology, Statistics, Statistical significance, High performance liquid chromatography, Kidney transplantation, Pharmacokinetics, Mycophenolic acid, Mycophenolate mofetil

88

Urine has long been a “favored” biofluid among metabolomics researchers. It is sterile, easy-to-obtain in large volumes, largely free from interfering proteins or lipids and chemically complex. However, this chemical complexity has also made urine a particularly difficult substrate to fully understand. As a biological waste material, urine typically contains metabolic breakdown products from a wide range of foods, drinks, drugs, environmental contaminants, endogenous waste metabolites and bacterial by-products. Many of these compounds are poorly characterized and poorly understood. In an effort to improve our understanding of this biofluid we have undertaken a comprehensive, quantitative, metabolome-wide characterization of human urine. This involved both computer-aided literature mining and comprehensive, quantitative experimental assessment/validation. The experimental portion employed NMR spectroscopy, gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS), direct flow injection mass spectrometry (DFI/LC-MS/MS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) experiments performed on multiple human urine samples. This multi-platform metabolomic analysis allowed us to identify 445 and quantify 378 unique urine metabolites or metabolite species. The different analytical platforms were able to identify (quantify) a total of: 209 (209) by NMR, 179 (85) by GC-MS, 127 (127) by DFI/LC-MS/MS, 40 (40) by ICP-MS and 10 (10) by HPLC. Our use of multiple metabolomics platforms and technologies allowed us to identify several previously unknown urine metabolites and to substantially enhance the level of metabolome coverage. It also allowed us to critically assess the relative strengths and weaknesses of different platforms or technologies. The literature review led to the identification and annotation of another 2206 urinary compounds and was used to help guide the subsequent experimental studies. An online database containing the complete set of 2651 confirmed human urine metabolite species, their structures (3079 in total), concentrations, related literature references and links to their known disease associations are freely available at http://www.urinemetabolome.ca.

Concepts: Metabolism, Chromatography, High performance liquid chromatography, Analytical chemistry, Metabolite, Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, Metabolomics, Metabolome

41

Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), the leading cause of postneonatal infant mortality, likely comprises heterogeneous disorders with the common phenotype of sudden death without explanation upon postmortem investigation. Previously, we reported that ∼40% of SIDS deaths are associated with abnormalities in serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) in regions of the brainstem critical in homeostatic regulation. Here we tested the hypothesis that SIDS is associated with an alteration in serum 5-HT levels. Serum 5-HT, adjusted for postconceptional age, was significantly elevated (95%) in SIDS infants (n = 61) compared with autopsied controls (n = 15) [SIDS, 177.2 ± 15.1 (mean ± SE) ng/mL versus controls, 91.1 ± 30.6 ng/mL] (P = 0.014), as determined by ELISA. This increase was validated using high-performance liquid chromatography. Thirty-one percent (19/61) of SIDS cases had 5-HT levels greater than 2 SDs above the mean of the controls, thus defining a subset of SIDS cases with elevated 5-HT. There was no association between genotypes of the serotonin transporter promoter region polymorphism and serum 5-HT level. This study demonstrates that SIDS is associated with peripheral abnormalities in the 5-HT pathway. High serum 5-HT may serve as a potential forensic biomarker in autopsied infants with SIDS with serotonergic defects.

Concepts: Death, Chromatography, High performance liquid chromatography, Infant mortality, Serotonin, Sudden infant death syndrome, Infancy, 5-HTTLPR

28

Previous dating of the Vi-207 and Vi-208 Neanderthal remains from Vindija Cave (Croatia) led to the suggestion that Neanderthals survived there as recently as 28,000-29,000 B.P. Subsequent dating yielded older dates, interpreted as ages of at least ∼32,500 B.P. We have redated these same specimens using an approach based on the extraction of the amino acid hydroxyproline, using preparative high-performance liquid chromatography (Prep-HPLC). This method is more efficient in eliminating modern contamination in the bone collagen. The revised dates are older than 40,000 B.P., suggesting the Vindija Neanderthals did not live more recently than others across Europe, and probably predate the arrival of anatomically modern humans in Eastern Europe. We applied zooarchaeology by mass spectrometry (ZooMS) to find additional hominin remains. We identified one bone that is Neanderthal, based on its mitochondrial DNA, and dated it directly to 46,200 ± 1,500 B.P. We also attempted to date six early Upper Paleolithic bone points from stratigraphic units G1, Fd/d+G1 and Fd/d, Fd. One bone artifact gave a date of 29,500 ± 400 B.P., while the remainder yielded no collagen. We additionally dated animal bone samples from units G1 and G1-G3 These dates suggest a co-occurrence of early Upper Paleolithic osseous artifacts, particularly split-based points, alongside the remains of Neanderthals is a result of postdepositional mixing, rather than an association between the two groups, although more work is required to show this definitively.

Concepts: Human, Collagen, Chromatography, High performance liquid chromatography, Neanderthal, Human evolution, Pleistocene, Middle Paleolithic

28

Phenolic compound profiles of 20 honeys of different botanical origin (eucalyptus, citrus, chestnut and linden) were obtained by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection after solid phase extraction, in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the fingerprint method for monofloral honey discrimination.

Concepts: Condensed matter physics, Chromatography, High performance liquid chromatography, Analytical chemistry, Honey, Separation process, Phases of matter, Monofloral honey

28

The objective of the present work was to develop a plant-bacterial synergistic system for efficient treatment of the textile effluents. Decolorization of the dye Scarlet RR and a dye mixture was studied under in vitro conditions using Glandularia pulchella (Sweet) Tronc., Pseudomonas monteilii ANK and their consortium. Four reactors viz. soil, bacteria, plant and consortium were developed that were subjected for treatment of textile effluents and dye mixture. Under in vitro conditions G. pulchella and P. monteilii showed decolorization of the dye Scarlet RR (SRR) by 97 and 84%, within 72 and 96 h respectively, while their consortium showed 100% decolorization of the dye within 48 h. In case of dye mixture G. pulchella, P. monteilii and consortium-PG showed an ADMI removal of 78, 67 and 92% respectively within 96 h. During decolorization of SRR G. pulchella showed induction in the activities of enzymes lignin peroxidase and DCIP reductase while P. monteilii showed induction of laccase, DCIP reductase and tyrosinase, indicating their involvement in the dye metabolism. High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC), Fourier Transform Infra Red Spectroscopy (FTIR) and High Performance Thin Layer Chromatography (HPTLC) confirmed the biotransformation of SRR and dye mixture into different metabolites. Soil, bacteria, plant and consortium reactors performed an ADMI removal of 42, 46, 62 and 93% in the first decolorization cycle while it showed an average ADMI removal of 21, 27, 59 and 93% in the next three (second, third and fourth) decolorization cycles respectively for the dye mixture within 24 h. Consortium reactor showed an average ADMI removal of 95% within 48 and 60 h for textile effluents A and B respectively for three decolorization cycles, while it showed an average TOC, COD and BOD removal of 74, 70 and 70%, 66, 72 and 67%, and 70, 70 and 66% for three decolorization cycles of the dye mixture (second, third and fourth decolorization cycles), effluent A and effluent B respectively. Degradation of the textile effluents and dye mixture into different metabolites by the consortium reactor was confirmed using HPLC and FTIR. Phytotoxicity studies revealed the non-toxic nature of the metabolites of degradation of dye mixture, effluents A and B by consortium reactor. The developed consortial reactor system performed efficient treatment of the dye mixture and textile effluents, and can be used for treating large amounts of textile effluents when implemented as a constructed wetland by proper engineering approach.

Concepts: Chromatography, High performance liquid chromatography, Sewage treatment, Infrared spectroscopy, Thin layer chromatography, Paper chromatography, HPTLC, Ligninase

28

Eucalyptus species are widely cultivated in Mediterranean regions. Moreover, plants of this family have been utilized for medicinal purposes. A number of studies have been devoted to the identification of eucalypt phenolics, all of them have focused on specific families of compounds, and no exhaustive profiling has been reported in leaves of this plant.

Concepts: Mass spectrometry, Species, Eucalyptus, Chromatography, High performance liquid chromatography, Electrospray ionization, Fern, Kingdom

28

Chlorantraniliprole, an anthranilic diamide insecticide with novel mode of action is found effective against several lepidopteran as well as coleopteran, dipteran, and hemipteran pests. The present studies were carried out to study the dissipation pattern of chlorantraniliprole on cauliflower and to suggest suitable waiting period for the safety of consumers. Quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe method was used for the extraction and cleanup of samples and the residues of chlorantraniliprole were estimated using high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC) and confirmed by liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer and high-performance thin layer chromatograph. Following three applications of chlorantraniliprole (Coragen 18.5 SC) at recommended dose (9.25 g a.i. ha(-1)) and double the recommended dose (18.50 g a.i. ha(-1)), the average initial deposits of chlorantraniliprole were observed to be 0.18 and 0.29 mg kg(-1), respectively. These deposits were found to be less than the maximum residue limit of 2.0 mg kg(-1) prescribed by the Codex Alimentarius Commission. These residues dissipated below the limit of quantification of 0.10 mg kg(-1) after 3 and 5 days at recommended and double the recommended dosages, respectively. The half-life value (T (½)) of chlorantraniliprole was worked out to be 1.36 days following its application at recommended dosages. Hence, the use of this pesticide at recommended dosages does not seem to pose any risk, and a waiting period of 1 day is suggested for safe consumption of cauliflower curds.

Concepts: Chromatography, High performance liquid chromatography, Pesticide, Codex Alimentarius, Codex Alimentarius Austriacus

28

Preparative high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) was successfully applied to the isolation and purification of two macrolactin antibiotics from marine bacterium Bacillus amyloliquefaciens for the first time using stepwise elution with a pair of two-phase solvent systems composed of n-hexane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water at (1:4:1:4, v/v) and (3:4:3:4, v/v). The preparative HSCCC separation was performed on 300mg of crude sample yielding macrolactin B (22.7mg) and macrolactin A (40.4mg) in a one-step separation, with purities over 95% as determined by HPLC. The structures of these compounds were identified by MS, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR. Our results demonstrated that HSCCC was an efficient technique to separate marine antibiotics, which provide an approach to solve the problem of their sample availability for drug development.

Concepts: Bacteria, Chromatography, High performance liquid chromatography, Analytical chemistry, Gas chromatography, Bacillus, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, Separation