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Concept: Grapefruit

169

Citrus has an extended juvenile phase and trees can take 2-20 years to transition to the adult reproductive phase and produce fruit. For citrus variety development this substantially prolongs the time before adult traits, such as fruit yield and quality, can be evaluated. Methods to transform tissue from mature citrus trees would shorten the evaluation period via the direct production of adult phase transgenic citrus trees.

Concepts: Zest, Pomelo, Rutaceae, Citron, Grapefruit, Fruit, Orange, Citrus

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Cultivated citrus are selections from, or hybrids of, wild progenitor species whose identities and contributions to citrus domestication remain controversial. Here we sequence and compare citrus genomes-a high-quality reference haploid clementine genome and mandarin, pummelo, sweet-orange and sour-orange genomes-and show that cultivated types derive from two progenitor species. Although cultivated pummelos represent selections from one progenitor species, Citrus maxima, cultivated mandarins are introgressions of C. maxima into the ancestral mandarin species Citrus reticulata. The most widely cultivated citrus, sweet orange, is the offspring of previously admixed individuals, but sour orange is an F1 hybrid of pure C. maxima and C. reticulata parents, thus implying that wild mandarins were part of the early breeding germplasm. A Chinese wild ‘mandarin’ diverges substantially from C. reticulata, thus suggesting the possibility of other unrecognized wild citrus species. Understanding citrus phylogeny through genome analysis clarifies taxonomic relationships and facilitates sequence-directed genetic improvement.

Concepts: Clementine, Grapefruit, Rutaceae, Pomelo, Tangerine, Mandarin orange, Orange, Citrus

29

The aim of this study was to investigate possible interactions between grapefruit juice and montelukast for up to 4 hours.

Concepts: Grapefruit spoon, Bioavailability, Grapefruit, Grapefruit juice

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AIM: This study examined the effects of grapefruit juice on the new P2Y(12) inhibitor ticagrelor, which is a substrate of CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein. METHODS: In a randomized crossover study, ten healthy volunteers ingested 200 ml of grapefruit juice or water thrice daily for four days. On day three, they ingested a single 90-mg dose of ticagrelor. RESULTS: Grapefruit juice increased ticagrelor geometric mean peak plasma concentration (C(max) ) to 165% (95% confidence interval, 147-184%) and area under the concentration-time curve (AUC(0-∞) ) to 221% of control (95% confidence interval, 200-245%). The C(max) and AUC(0-34h) (P < 0.05) but not the AUC(0-∞) of the active metabolite C12490XX were decreased significantly. Grapefruit juice had a minor effect on ticagrelor elimination half-life prolonging it from 6.7 to 7.2 h (P = 0.036). In good correlation with the elevated plasma ticagrelor concentrations, grapefruit juice enhanced the antiplatelet effect of ticagrelor, assessed with VerifyNow® and Multiplate® methods, and postponed the recovery of platelet reactivity. CONCLUSIONS: Grapefruit juice increased ticagrelor exposure by more than two-fold, leading to an enhanced and prolonged ticagrelor antiplatelet effect. The grapefruit juice-ticagrelor interaction seems clinically important and indicates the significance of intestinal metabolism to ticagrelor pharmacokinetics.

Concepts: Effect, Pharmacokinetics, Grapefruit, Statistical hypothesis testing, Interval finite element, Statistics, Crossover study, Pharmacology

28

Leprosis is one of the most serious citrus plant diseases. Leprosis-affected plants, especially sweet orange [Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck], which is the most widely cultivated citrus fruit worldwide, show reduced photosynthetic capacity and severe defoliation. The aim was to evaluate the relationship between the Brevipalpus phoenicis (Geijskes) vector mite and citrus leprosis disease in Pera sweet orange plants grafted on different rootstocks. Data were analysed using numerical classification and conventional statistical analysis (ANOVA).

Concepts: Citron, Tangerine, Lemon, Rutaceae, Grapefruit, Orange, Fruit, Citrus

28

The curative and protective activity of sodium bicarbonate (SBC) at 1% alone or in combination with fludioxonil (FLU), thiabendazole (TBZ) or with FLU and TBZ together, between 50 and 600 mg/L, was on fruit of different citrus species and cultivars. Fruits were either artificially inoculated with a resistant (TBZ-r) or sensible (TBZ-s) strain of Penicilium digitatum or not inoculated and incubated at 20 °C and 90% RH for 7 days (incubated fruit) or stored at 1.5 °C for 21 d plus 7 d of simulate marketing conditions at 20 °C and 60% RH. The effectiveness of these treatments was related with treatment-induced changes of epicuticular wax morphology, the mode of distribution of SBC, TBZ and FLU on fruit surface, and FLU and TBZ fruit residue levels. SBC alone showed a weak activity against both strains of P. digitatum. Both TBZ and FLU were very effective at all rates used, and their activity markedly increased when combined together or with SBC, even at concentrations of 50-150 mg/L. Fruit treated with SBC either alone or in combination with TBZ or/and FLU increased weight loss, although no treatment damage was detected. Residue levels of TBZ generally increased when TBZ was combined with FLU and/or SBC, while those of FLU slightly increased only in treatment where FLU was combined with TBZ and SBC. Initial residues of TBZ and FLU when applied at 600 mg/L were around 2 and 1 mg/kg, respectively, several times below the lowest MRLs set by most important citrus producing countries. In treatments with SBC or SBC plus TBZ or FLU, SEM observation of fruit surface showed a smoothing of cuticular wax platelets' surface, while ESEM micrographs showed irregular spots of salt deposits of roundish to irregular shape. The apparently uneven distribution of SBC or SBC plus TBZ or FLU or SBC plus TBZ and FLU on fruit, might in part reduce the potential beneficial effects of SBC or of fungicides-SBC mixtures.

Concepts: Efficacy, Effectiveness, Citrus australasica, Citron, Grapefruit, Orange, Fruit, Citrus

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Extracts, subfractions, isolated anthocyanins and procyanidins, and two phenolic acids from aronia [Aronia melanocarpa] were investigated for their CYP3A4 inhibitory effects, using midazolam as the probe substrate and recombinant insect cell microsomes expressing CYP3A4 as the enzyme source. Procyanidin B5 was a considerably stronger CYP3A4 inhibitor in vitro than the isomeric procyanidin B2 and comparable to bergamottin, a known CYP3A4 inhibitor from grapefruit juice. The inhibitory activity of proanthocyanidin-containing fractions was correlated to the degree of polymerization. Among the anthocyanins, cyanidin 3-arabinoside showed stronger CYP3A4 inhibition than cyanidin 3-galactoside and cyanidin 3-glucoside. Thus, the ability to inhibit CYP3A4 in vitro seems to be influenced by the sugar unit linked to the anthocyanidin.

Concepts: Grapefruit juice, Enzyme inhibitor, B type proanthocyanidin, Grapefruit, Bergamottin, Proanthocyanidins, CYP3A4, Cytochrome P450

28

Two cultivars (Citrus grandis (L.) Osbeck PO 51 and PO 52) of Malaysian pomelo juices were studied by examining their physicochemical properties (i.e. pH, °Brix and titratable acidity), volatile and non-volatile components (sugars and organic acids). Using solvent extraction and headspace solid-phase microextraction, 49 and 65 volatile compounds were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometer/flame ionisation detector, respectively. Compared to pink pomelo juice (cultivar PO 52), white pomelo juice (cultivar PO 51) contained lower amount of total volatiles but higher terpenoids. Descriptive sensory evaluation indicated that white pomelo juice was milder in taste especially acidity. Furthermore, principal component analysis and partial least square regression revealed a strong correlation in pomelo juices between their chemical components and some flavour attributes (i.e. acidic, fresh, peely and sweet). Hence, this research enabled a deeper insight into the flavour of this unique citrus fruit.

Concepts: Pomelo, Juice vesicles, PH, Tangelo, Orange, Grapefruit, Citrus, Acid

27

The effects of various factors, including the extraction time, temperature, solvent/material ratio, the ultrasonic intensity and duty cycle of ultrasonic irradiation on the extraction yield of all-trans-lycopene from red grapefruit by ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) were investigated. In comparison with conventional solvent extraction (CSE), UAE showed a pronounced greater extraction yield and reduced extraction time effectively with a peak value at 30 min. The extraction yield was significantly influenced by temperature and the optimum condition was 30 °C. The extraction yield increased with increasing of solvent/material ratio until equilibrium was arrived at the optimal ratio of 3:1 (mL/g). The extraction yield increased first and then decreased with an increase in ultrasonic intensity. The extraction yield of UAE increased with the increase of duty cycle, whereas pulsed ultrasound with proper intervals was more efficient than continuous ultrasonication. The degradation via isomerisation of all-trans-lycopene under ultrasonic treatment was also observed with the formation of 9,13'-di-cis-, 9,13-di-cis-, 15-cis-, 13-cis- and 9-cis-lycopene isomers which were tentatively identified by HPLC-PAD.

Concepts: Physical quantities, Tangelo, Grapefruit, Citrus

4

The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the evidence for or against the effectiveness of grapefruits (Citrus paradisi) on body weight, blood pressure and lipid profile. Electronic searches were conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED and the Cochrane Clinical Trials databases to identify relevant human randomized clinical trials (RCTs). Hand searches of bibliographies were also conducted. Only overweight and obese subjects were included. The reporting quality was assessed using the CONSORT checklist, and the strength of the overall body of evidence was rated based on the GRADE criteria. 154 citations were identified and three RCTs with a total of 250 participants were included. The RCTs were of moderate quality. A meta-analysis for change in body weight failed to reveal a significant difference between grapefruits and controls, MD: -0.45 kg (95% CI: -1.06 to 0.16; I(2) = 53%, but analysis revealed a significant decrease in systolic blood pressure, MD: -2.43 mmHg (95%CI: -4.77 to -0.09; I(2) = 0%). Paucity in the number of RCTs, short durations of interventions, and lack of an established minimum effective dose limit the conclusions that can be drawn about the effects of grapefruit on body weight and metabolic parameters. Further clinical trials evaluating the effects of grapefruit are warranted.

Concepts: Evidence-based medicine, Tangelo, Citrus, Epidemiology, Grapefruit, Clinical trial, Effectiveness