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Concept: Glucose tolerance test

201

Over-nutrition has fuelled the global epidemic of type 2 diabetes, but the role of individual macronutrients to the diabetogenic process is not well delineated. We aimed to examine the impact of dietary fatty acid intake on fasting and 2-hour plasma glucose concentrations, as well as tissue-specific insulin action governing each. Normoglycemic controls (n = 15), athletes (n = 14), and obese (n = 23), as well as people with prediabetes (n = 10) and type 2 diabetes (n = 11), were queried about their habitual diet using a Food Frequency Questionnaire. All subjects were screened by an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and studied using the hyperinsulinemic/euglycemic clamp with infusion of 6,62H2-glucose. Multiple regression was performed to examine relationships between dietary fat intake and 1) fasting plasma glucose, 2) % suppression of endogenous glucose production, 3) 2-hour post-OGTT plasma glucose, and 4) skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity (glucose rate of disappearance (Rd) and non-oxidative glucose disposal (NOGD)). The %kcal from saturated fat (SFA) was positively associated with fasting (β = 0.303, P = 0.018) and 2-hour plasma glucose (β = 0.415, P<0.001), and negatively related to % suppression of hepatic glucose production (β = -0.245, P = 0.049), clamp Rd (β = -0.256, P = 0.001) and NOGD (β = -0.257, P = 0.001). The %kcal from trans fat was also negatively related to clamp Rd (β = -0.209, P = 0.008) and NOGD (β = -0.210, P = 0.008). In contrast, the %kcal from polyunsaturated fat (PUFA) was negatively associated with 2-hour glucose levels (β = -0.383, P = 0.001), and positively related to Rd (β = 0.253, P = 0.007) and NOGD (β = 0.246, P = 0.008). Dietary advice to prevent diabetes should consider the underlying pathophysiology of the prediabetic state.

Concepts: Unsaturated fat, Fat, Blood sugar, Saturated fat, Glucose tolerance test, Diabetes mellitus, Insulin, Nutrition

187

OBJECTIVE: To highlight the contribution of the gut microbiota to the modulation of host metabolism by dietary inulin-type fructans (ITF prebiotics) in obese women. METHODS: A double blind, placebo controlled, intervention study was performed with 30 obese women treated with ITF prebiotics (inulin/oligofructose 50/50 mix; n=15) or placebo (maltodextrin; n=15) for 3 months (16 g/day). Blood, faeces and urine sampling, oral glucose tolerance test, homeostasis model assessment and impedancemetry were performed before and after treatment. The gut microbial composition in faeces was analysed by phylogenetic microarray and qPCR analysis of 16S rDNA. Plasma and urine metabolic profiles were analysed by (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. RESULTS: Treatment with ITF prebiotics, but not the placebo, led to an increase in Bifidobacterium and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii; both bacteria negatively correlated with serum lipopolysaccharide levels. ITF prebiotics also decreased Bacteroides intestinalis, Bacteroides vulgatus and Propionibacterium, an effect associated with a slight decrease in fat mass and with plasma lactate and phosphatidylcholine levels. No clear treatment clustering could be detected for gut microbial analysis or plasma and urine metabolomic profile analyses. However, ITF prebiotics led to subtle changes in the gut microbiota that may importantly impact on several key metabolites implicated in obesity and/or diabetes. CONCLUSIONS: ITF prebiotics selectively changed the gut microbiota composition in obese women, leading to modest changes in host metabolism, as suggested by the correlation between some bacterial species and metabolic endotoxaemia or metabolomic signatures.

Concepts: Obesity, Glucose tolerance test, Blood sugar, Diabetes mellitus, Nutrition, Metabolism, Gut flora, Bacteria

186

BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies suggest that excessive sitting time is associated with increased health risk, independent of the performance of exercise. We hypothesized that a daily bout of exercise cannot compensate the negative effects of inactivity during the rest of the day on insulin sensitivity and plasma lipids. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Eighteen healthy subjects, age 21±2 year, BMI 22.6±2.6 kgm(-2) followed randomly three physical activity regimes for four days. Participants were instructed to sit 14 hr/day (sitting regime); to sit 13 hr/day and to substitute 1 hr of sitting with vigorous exercise 1 hr (exercise regime); to substitute 6 hrs sitting with 4 hr walking and 2 hr standing (minimal intensity physical activity (PA) regime). The sitting and exercise regime had comparable numbers of sitting hours; the exercise and minimal intensity PA regime had the same daily energy expenditure. PA was assessed continuously by an activity monitor (ActivPAL) and a diary. Measurements of insulin sensitivity (oral glucose tolerance test, OGTT) and plasma lipids were performed in the fasting state, the morning after the 4 days of each regime. In the sitting regime, daily energy expenditure was about 500 kcal lower than in both other regimes. Area under the curve for insulin during OGTT was significantly lower after the minimal intensity PA regime compared to both sitting and exercise regimes 6727.3±4329.4 vs 7752.0±3014.4 and 8320.4±5383.7 mU•min/ml, respectively. Triglycerides, non-HDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein B plasma levels improved significantly in the minimal intensity PA regime compared to sitting and showed non-significant trends for improvement compared to exercise. CONCLUSIONS: One hour of daily physical exercise cannot compensate the negative effects of inactivity on insulin level and plasma lipids if the rest of the day is spent sitting. Reducing inactivity by increasing the time spent walking/standing is more effective than one hour of physical exercise, when energy expenditure is kept constant.

Concepts: Impaired fasting glycaemia, Impaired glucose tolerance, Overweight, Diabetes mellitus, Insulin resistance, Obesity, Glucose tolerance test, Insulin

178

Wide-scale profiling technologies including metabolomics broaden the possibility of novel discoveries related to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2D). By applying non-targeted metabolomics approach, we investigated here whether serum metabolite profile predicts T2D in a well-characterized study population with impaired glucose tolerance by examining two groups of individuals who took part in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study (DPS); those who either early developed T2D (n = 96) or did not convert to T2D within the 15-year follow-up (n = 104). Several novel metabolites were associated with lower likelihood of developing T2D, including indole and lipid related metabolites. Higher indolepropionic acid was associated with reduced likelihood of T2D in the DPS. Interestingly, in those who remained free of T2D, indolepropionic acid and various lipid species were associated with better insulin secretion and sensitivity, respectively. Furthermore, these metabolites were negatively correlated with low-grade inflammation. We replicated the association between indolepropionic acid and T2D risk in one Finnish and one Swedish population. We suggest that indolepropionic acid, a gut microbiota-produced metabolite, is a potential biomarker for the development of T2D that may mediate its protective effect by preservation of β-cell function. Novel lipid metabolites associated with T2D may exert their effects partly through enhancing insulin sensitivity.

Concepts: Metabolism, Metabolic syndrome, Glucose tolerance test, Insulin resistance, Obesity, Diabetes mellitus, Diabetes mellitus type 2, Insulin

173

To examine whether there is a difference in the association between high pulse pressure and proteinuria, independent of other blood pressure (BP) indices, such as systolic or diastolic BP, among subjects with diabetes, prediabetes, or normal glucose tolerance.

Concepts: The Association, Cardiology, Ventricle, Nutrition, Glucose tolerance test, Insulin, Pulse pressure, Blood pressure

168

This study was designed to evaluate accuracy, performance, and safety of the Dexcom (San Diego, CA) G4(®) Platinum continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system (G4P) compared with the Dexcom G4 Platinum with Software 505 algorithm (SW505) when used as adjunctive management to blood glucose (BG) monitoring over a 7-day period in youth, 2-17 years of age, with diabetes.

Concepts: Nutrition, Glucose tolerance test, Diabetes, Glucose, Insulin, Blood glucose monitoring, Blood sugar, Diabetes mellitus

150

HbA1c ≥ 6.5% has been recommended as a diagnostic criterion for the detection of diabetes mellitus (DM) since 2010 because of its convenience, stability and significant correlation with diabetic complications. Nevertheless, the accuracy of HbA1c compared to glucose-based diagnostic criteria varies among subjects of different ethnicity and risk profile.

Concepts: Diabetes, Insulin resistance, Blood sugar, Glycated hemoglobin, Nutrition, Glucose tolerance test, Insulin, Diabetes mellitus

149

This study assessed indicators of the need for insulin therapy and the effect of treatment on pregnancy outcomes in Japanese patients with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). All patients diagnosed with GDM were hospitalized for three days. Plasma glucose profiles in patients under strict dietary management and the characteristics of GDM patients with high daily glucose levels were investigated. Patients who failed to achieve glycemic targets were treated with insulin. Indicators of the need for insulin treatment were investigated. Pregnancy outcomes in patients prescribed dietary management and patients prescribed insulin treatment were compared. The study included 112 patients with GDM. GDM patients with high daily glucose levels in the hospital exhibited significantly higher 1-h and 2-h plasma glucose levels in oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) at diagnosis. In our hospital, 102 GDM patients with singleton pregnancies were followed until delivery; 32 (31.3%) were treated with insulin. Univariate analysis identified significant associations of insulin requirement with family history of diabetes and with 1-h and 2-h OGTT values at diagnosis. Multivariate analysis showed that the 1-h OGTT plasma glucose level at diagnosis was an independent predictor of the need for insulin. In perinatal outcomes, insulin treatment was associated with low birth weight.

Concepts: Insulin resistance, Gestational diabetes, Blood sugar, Pregnancy, Insulin, Obstetrics, Glucose tolerance test, Diabetes mellitus

79

Diurnal carbohydrate and fat distribution modulates glycaemic control in rodents. In humans, the optimal timing of both macronutrients and its effects on glycaemic control after prolonged consumption are not studied in detail. In this cross-over trial, 29 non-obese men were randomized to two four-week diets: (1) carbohydrate-rich meals until 13.30 and fat-rich meals between 16.30 and 22.00 (HC/HF) versus (2) inverse sequence of meals (HF/HC). After each trial period two meal tolerance tests were performed, at 09.00 and 15.40, respectively, according to the previous intervention. On the HF/HC diet, whole-day glucose level was increased by 7.9% (p = 0.026) in subjects with impaired fasting glucose and/or impaired glucose tolerance (IFG/IGT, n = 11), and GLP-1 by 10.2% (p = 0.041) in normal glucose-tolerant subjects (NGT, n = 18). Diet effects on fasting GLP-1 (p = 0.009) and PYY (p = 0.034) levels were observed in IFG/IGT, but not in NGT. Afternoon decline of glucose tolerance was more pronounced in IFG/IGT and associated with a stronger decrease of postprandial GLP-1 and PYY levels, but not with changes of cortisol rhythm. In conclusion, the HF/HC diet shows an unfavourable effect on glycaemic control in IFG/IGT, but not in NGT subjects. Consequently, large, carbohydrate-rich dinners should be avoided, primarily by subjects with impaired glucose metabolism.

Concepts: Glucose, Fat, Glucose tolerance test, Impaired fasting glycaemia, Carbohydrate, Randomized controlled trial, Impaired glucose tolerance, Nutrition

59

OBJECTIVE: Few studies examined the association between time-of-day of nutrient intake and the metabolic syndrome. Our goal was to compare a weight loss diet with high caloric intake during breakfast to an isocaloric diet with high caloric intake at dinner. DESIGN AND METHODS: Overweight and obese women (BMI 32.4±1.8 kg/m(2) ) with metabolic syndrome were randomized into two isocaloric (∼1400kcal) weight loss groups, a breakfast (BF) (700kcal breakfast, 500kcal lunch, 200kcal dinner) or a dinner (D) group (200kcal breakfast, 500kcal lunch, 700kcal dinner) for 12 weeks. RESULTS: The BF group showed greater weight loss and waist circumference reduction. Although fasting glucose, insulin and ghrelin were reduced in both groups, fasting glucose, insulin and HOMA-IR decreased significantly to a greater extent in the BF group. Mean triglyceride levels decreased by 33.6% in the BF group, but increased by 14.6% in the D group. Oral glucose tolerance test led to a greater decrease of glucose and insulin in the BF. In response to meal challenges, the overall daily glucose, insulin, ghrelin and mean hunger scores were significantly lower, whereas mean satiety scores were significantly higher in the BF group. CONCLUSIONS: High-calorie breakfast with reduced intake at dinner is beneficial and might be a useful alternative for the management of obesity and metabolic syndrome.

Concepts: Meal, Dieting, Glucose tolerance test, Insulin resistance, Insulin, Diabetes mellitus, Nutrition, Obesity