SciCombinator

Discover the most talked about and latest scientific content & concepts.

Concept: Get Your Sexy Back

94

Excessive drinking accounted for approximately 4,300 deaths each year among persons aged <21 years during 2006-2010,* and underage drinking cost the United States $24.3 billion in 2010 (1). CDC analyzed data from the national Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) for the years 1991-2015 to examine trends in drinking by U.S. high school students, and from the 2015 YRBS to assess the usual source of alcohol consumed(†) and binge drinking intensity (i.e., the average number of drinks consumed per binge drinking occasion).(§) During 1991-2007, the prevalence of current drinking(¶) among high school students declined significantly, from 50.8% (1991) to 44.7% (2007), and then significantly declined to 32.8% in 2015. The prevalence of binge drinking** increased from 31.3% in 1991 to 31.5% in 1999, and then significantly declined to 17.7% in 2015. Most high school students who drank were binge drinkers (57.8%), and 43.8% of binge drinkers consumed eight or more drinks in a row. Despite progress, current drinking and binge drinking are common among high school students, and many students who binge drink do so at high intensity (i.e., eight or more drinks in a row). Widespread use of evidence-based strategies for preventing excessive drinking (e.g., increasing alcohol taxes, regulating alcohol outlet density, and having commercial host liability laws) could help reduce underage drinking and related harms.(††).

Concepts: Alcoholism, Alcohol abuse, Beer, Drinking culture, Binge drinking, Drink, Get Your Sexy Back

17

Abstinence from alcohol is associated with the recruitment of neurons in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) in nondependent rats that binge drink alcohol and in alcohol-dependent rats. However, whether the recruitment of this neuronal ensemble in the CeA is causally related to excessive alcohol drinking or if it represents a consequence of excessive drinking remains unknown. We tested the hypothesis that the recruitment of a neuronal ensemble in the CeA during abstinence is required for excessive alcohol drinking in nondependent rats that binge drink alcohol and in alcohol-dependent rats. We found that inactivation of the CeA neuronal ensemble during abstinence significantly decreased alcohol drinking in both groups. In nondependent rats, the decrease in alcohol intake was transient and returned to normal the day after the injection. In dependent rats, inactivation of the neuronal ensemble with Daun02 produced a long-term decrease in alcohol drinking. Moreover, we observed a significant reduction of somatic withdrawal signs in dependent animals that were injected with Daun02 in the CeA. These results indicate that the recruitment of a neuronal ensemble in the CeA during abstinence from alcohol is causally related to excessive alcohol drinking in alcohol-dependent rats, whereas a similar neuronal ensemble only partially contributed to alcohol-binge-like drinking in nondependent rats. These results identify a critical neurobiological mechanism that may be required for the transition to alcohol dependence, suggesting that focusing on the neuronal ensemble in the CeA may lead to a better understanding of the etiology of alcohol use disorders and improve medication development.

Concepts: Nervous system, Alcoholism, Alcohol abuse, Alcoholic beverage, Beer, Drinking culture, Binge drinking, Get Your Sexy Back

14

Of outcomes related to excessive drinking, binge drinking accounts for approximately half of alcohol-attributable deaths, two thirds of years of potential life lost, and three fourths of economic costs. The extent to which the alcohol policy environment accounts for differences in binge drinking in U.S. states is unknown.

Concepts: Life, Alcoholism, U.S. state, Alcohol abuse, Beer, Drinking culture, Binge drinking, Get Your Sexy Back

5

BACKGROUND: Prior research attributed youth alcohol consumption to the attitudes and drinking patterns among adults. Yet at a population level, few have examined the relationship between state-level adult binge drinking prevalence and youth drinking behaviors, or whether tax policy plays a role in this relationship. METHODS: We analyzed 6 biennial surveys (1999 to 2009) of individual-level youth alcohol use and related behaviors from state-based Youth Risk Behavior Surveys and corresponding years of state-level adult binge drinking prevalence from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. We employed logistic regression with generalized estimating equations method to assess the extent to which state adult binge drinking predicted individual-level youth drinking outcomes and examined the role of alcohol taxes in that relationship. RESULTS: Population-aggregate analyses based on 194 state-year strata showed a positive correlation between state adult binge drinking and youth binge drinking (Pearson r = 0.40, p < 0.01). For individual-level youth drinking outcomes, a 5 percentage point increase in binge drinking prevalence among adults was associated with a 12% relative increase in the odds of alcohol use (adjusted OR = 1.12, 95% CI: 1.08, 1.16). Taxes were strongly inversely related with adult and youth drinking measures, and the effect of tax on youth drinking was attenuated after controlling for adult binge drinking. CONCLUSIONS: Both tax and adult binge drinking are strong predictors of youth drinking. Tax may affect youth drinking through its effect on adult alcohol consumption. Implementing effective alcohol policies to reduce excessive drinking in the general population is an important strategy to reduce youth drinking.

Concepts: Regression analysis, Alcohol, Alcoholism, Alcohol abuse, Beer, Drinking culture, Binge drinking, Get Your Sexy Back

2

While inhibition has been studied extensively in correlation to alcohol abuse within the adult population, it has been studied less so in relation to the alcohol consumption habits of young adults. Accordingly, this is the first study with the objective of identifying which subcomponent(s) of inhibitory performance, behaviourally measured by the withholding of a pre-potent response, the cancellation of a pre-potent response and interference inhibition will best predict binge drinking habits among young adults.

Concepts: Alcohol, Alcoholism, Alcohol abuse, Wine, Beer, Drinking culture, Binge drinking, Get Your Sexy Back

2

To investigate the association between alcohol consumption and binge drinking before and during early pregnancy and adverse pregnancy outcomes.

Concepts: Alcoholism, The Association, Alcohol abuse, Alcoholic beverage, Beer, Drinking culture, Binge drinking, Get Your Sexy Back

1

Overconsumption of alcohol has significant negative effects on an individual’s health and contributes to an enormous economic impact on society as a whole. Pharmacotherapies to curb excessive drinking are important for treating alcohol use disorders.

Concepts: Alcohol, Alcoholism, Alcohol abuse, Beer, Drinking culture, Binge drinking, Kudzu, Get Your Sexy Back

1

Most Dutch adolescents aged 16 to 18 engage in binge drinking. Previous studies have investigated how parenting dimensions and alcohol-specific parenting practices are related to adolescent alcohol consumption. Mixed results have been obtained on both dimensions and practices, highlighting the complexity of untangling alcohol-related factors. The aim of this study was to investigate (1) whether parents' reports of parenting dimensions and alcohol-specific parenting practices, adolescents' perceptions of these dimensions and practices, or a combination are most informative to identify binge drinkers, and (2) which of these parenting dimensions and alcohol-specific parenting practices are most informative to identify binge drinkers.

Concepts: Alcoholism, Alcohol abuse, Beer, Drinking culture, Binge drinking, Get Your Sexy Back

0

This study explored substance use prevalence, level of risk, and associated factors, especially related to binge drinking. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 306 students using questionnaires and the Alcohol, Smoking, and Substance Involvement Screening Test-Youth screening tool. The associations between binge drinking and risk factors were analyzed by generalized linear models. Our results showed current prevalence rates of alcohol, tobacco, and drugs use were 56.9%, 22.9%, and 2.3%, respectively. Multivariate analyses showed that being a binge drinker was significantly associated with low self-efficacy, high sensation seeking, moderate to high smoking risk, and low grade point average.

Concepts: Alcoholism, Alcohol abuse, Beer, Drinking culture, Binge drinking, Get Your Sexy Back

0

Binge drinking is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular (CV) disease. MicroRNA-21 (miR21) is upregulated in the setting of excessive alcohol consumption and CV disease. Therefore, the goal of this study was to examine the vasodilatory responses to flow and acetylcholine in the absence and presence of an anti-miR21 inhibitor in the microcirculation of young adult repeated binge drinkers.

Concepts: Alcoholism, Alcohol abuse, Beer, Drinking culture, Binge drinking, Get Your Sexy Back