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Concept: Generation X

114

In four large, nationally representative surveys (N = 11.2 million), American adolescents and emerging adults in the 2010s (Millennials) were significantly less religious than previous generations (Boomers, Generation X) at the same age. The data are from the Monitoring the Future studies of 12th graders (1976-2013), 8th and 10th graders (1991-2013), and the American Freshman survey of entering college students (1966-2014). Although the majority of adolescents and emerging adults are still religiously involved, twice as many 12th graders and college students, and 20%-40% more 8th and 10th graders, never attend religious services. Twice as many 12th graders and entering college students in the 2010s (vs. the 1960s-70s) give their religious affiliation as “none,” as do 40%-50% more 8th and 10th graders. Recent birth cohorts report less approval of religious organizations, are less likely to say that religion is important in their lives, report being less spiritual, and spend less time praying or meditating. Thus, declines in religious orientation reach beyond affiliation to religious participation and religiosity, suggesting a movement toward secularism among a growing minority. The declines are larger among girls, Whites, lower-SES individuals, and in the Northeastern U.S., very small among Blacks, and non-existent among political conservatives. Religious affiliation is lower in years with more income inequality, higher median family income, higher materialism, more positive self-views, and lower social support. Overall, these results suggest that the lower religious orientation of Millennials is due to time period or generation, and not to age.

Concepts: Demographics, Religion, Meditation, Household income in the United States, Spirituality, Generation Y, Generation, Generation X

8

We examined whether culture-level indices of threat, instability, and materialistic modeling were linked to the materialistic values of American 12th graders between 1976 and 2007 (N = 355,296). Youth materialism (such as the importance of money and of owning expensive material items) increased over the generations, peaking in the late 1980s to early 1990s with Generation X and then staying at historically high levels for Millennials (GenMe). Societal instability and disconnection (e.g., unemployment, divorce) and social modeling (e.g., advertising spending) had both contemporaneous and lagged associations with higher levels of materialism, with advertising most influential during adolescence and instability during childhood. Societal-level living standards during childhood predicted materialism 10 years later. When materialistic values increased, work centrality steadily declined, suggesting a growing discrepancy between the desire for material rewards and the willingness to do the work usually required to earn them.

Concepts: Sociology, The Work, 1990s, Generation Y, Materialism, Generation, Generation X, Kylie Minogue

3

To determine differences in sociodemographic and health related characteristics of Australian Baby Boomers and Generation X at the same relative age.

Concepts: Epidemiology, Demographics, Generation Y, Cultural generations, Generation X

2

We report social media (SoMe) utilization trends at an academic radiology department, highlighting differences between trainees and faculty and between Baby Boomers versus Generation X and Millennials.

Concepts: Demographics, Generation Y, Cultural generations, Generation X

1

We examined generational differences in reasons for attending college among a nationally representative sample of college students (N = 8 million), 1971-2014. We validated the items on reasons for attending college against an established measure of extrinsic and intrinsic values among college students in 2014 (n = 189). Millennials (in college 2000s-2010s) and Generation X (1980s-1990s) valued extrinsic reasons for going to college (“to make more money”) more, and anti-extrinsic reasons (“to gain a general education and appreciation of ideas”) less than Boomers when they were the same age in the 1960s-1970s. Extrinsic reasons for going to college were higher in years with more income inequality, college enrollment, and extrinsic values. These results mirror previous research finding generational increases in extrinsic values begun by GenX and continued by Millennials, suggesting that more recent generations are more likely to favor extrinsic values in their decision-making.

Concepts: Education, Motivation, Economic inequality, Intrinsic and extrinsic properties, Generation Y, Generation, Generation X, Vivica A. Fox

1

We examine differences in household specialization between same-sex and different-sex couples within and across three birth cohorts: Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Generation Y. Using three measures of household specialization, we find that same-sex couples are less likely than their different-sex counterparts to exhibit a high degree of specialization. However, the “specialization gap” between same-sex and different-sex couples narrows across birth cohorts. These findings are indicative of a cohort effect. Our results are largely robust to the inclusion of a control for the presence of children and for subsets of couples with and without children. We provide three potential explanations for why the specialization gap narrows across cohorts. First, different-sex couples from more recent birth cohorts may have become more like same-sex couples in terms of household specialization. Second, social and legal changes may have prompted a greater degree of specialization within same-sex couples relative to different-sex couples. Last, the advent of reproductive technologies, which made having children easier for same-sex couples from more recent birth cohorts, could result in more specialization in such couples relative to different-sex couples.

Concepts: Cohort study, Demographics, Advent, Baby boomer, Generation Y, Cultural generations, Strauss and Howe, Generation X

0

Some consumers in Colombia show a clear preference for purebred dogs. At the same time, there are many abandoned dogs on the streets and in shelters in this country. Previous research has revealed that appearances of the breeds influence the caregivers' (owners') choice. A choice based on appearances has been connected with materialism in the psychology and consumer behavior literature. Buying purebred dogs based on materialistic standards could affect the welfare of these nonhuman animals. With the use of quantitative research and the methodology of structural equation modeling, this research demonstrated that more materialistic consumers in Colombia have purebred dogs who, in the owners' opinions, show more behavioral problems. Furthermore, the results showed that materialism influenced the owners' intentions to abandon their companion animals when they perceived these problems. Finally, this research examined the moderating effect of generational segmentation regarding these relationships. It was observed that the intention to abandon the dogs was greater among members of Generation X than among members of Generation Y.

Concepts: Scientific method, Psychology, Quantitative research, Dog breed, Purebred, Generation Y, Generation, Generation X

0

The millennial generation consists of today’s medical students, radiology residents, fellows, and junior staff. Millennials' comfort with immersive technology, high expectations for success, and desire for constant feedback differentiate them from previous generations. Drawing from an author’s experiences through radiology residency and fellowship as a millennial, from published literature, and from the mentorship of a long-time radiology educator, this article explores educational strategies that embrace these characteristics to engage today’s youngest generation both in and out of the reading room.

Concepts: Education, School, Teacher, Generation Y, Strauss and Howe, Generation X, Generation Z

0

Most students entering nursing programs today are members of Generation Y or the Millennial generation, and they learn differently than previous generations. Nurse educators must consider implementing innovative teaching strategies that appeal to the newest generation of learners. The Plan-Do-Study-Act cycle is a framework that can be helpful when planning, assessing, and continually improving teaching pedagogy. This article describes the use of iterative Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles to implement a change in teaching pedagogy.

Concepts: Education, Teacher, Pedagogy, Generation Y, Strauss and Howe, Generation X, Generation Z

0

This study sought to specify (1) the position of nonmedical prescription opioids (NMPO) in drug initiation sequences among Millennials (1979-96), Generation X (1964-79), and Baby Boomers (1949-64) and (2) gender and racial/ethnic differences in sequences among Millennials.

Concepts: Opioid, Demographics, Baby boomer, Generation Y, Generation, Cultural generations, Strauss and Howe, Generation X