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Concept: Fixed prosthodontics

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The aim of this study was to investigate whether advanced simulation parameters, such as simulation exam scores, number of student self-evaluations, time to complete the simulation, and time to complete self-evaluations, served as predictors of dental students' preclinical performance. Students from three consecutive classes (n=282) at one U.S. dental school completed advanced simulation training and exams within the first four months of their dental curriculum. The students then completed conventional preclinical instruction and exams in operative dentistry (OD) and fixed prosthodontics (FP) courses, taken during the first and second years of dental school, respectively. Two advanced simulation exam scores (ASES1 and ASES2) were tested as predictors of performance in the two preclinical courses based on final course grades. ASES1 and ASES2 were found to be predictors of OD and FP preclinical course grades. Other advanced simulation parameters were not significantly related to grades in the preclinical courses. These results highlight the value of an early psychomotor skills assessment in dentistry. Advanced simulation scores may allow early intervention in students' learning process and assist in efficient allocation of resources such as faculty coverage and tutor assignment.

Concepts: Completeness, Education, Skill, Learning, Resource allocation, Final examination, Prosthodontics, Fixed prosthodontics

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Preclinical dental students must demonstrate aptitude in the preparation of teeth for treatment with several types of fixed dental prostheses. The optimal sequence of instruction and examination of these crown preparations in preclinical fixed prosthodontics is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine if grading scores by faculty and students were affected by changing the sequence of crown type preparations. Practical exams of two successive student cohorts (n=89 in 2014; n=92 in 2015) at one U.S. dental school using three crown preparations (full cast, porcelain fused to metal, and all-ceramic) in different order were analyzed by faculty grades and student self-assessment. All of the models indicated that the sequence in which the crown type preparations were taught did have an effect on the grades. The 2014 cohort had overall higher grades and particularly higher grades for the all-ceramic crown preparations. Evaluation scores were affected by the sequence in which the different crown type preparations were taught and tested. Although the overall results suggested that students may perform better if the all-ceramic crown preparation is taught last, this tendency may differ between years.

Concepts: Crown, Dental restoration, Restorative dentistry, CAD/CAM Dentistry, Bridge, Prosthodontology, Inlays and onlays, Fixed prosthodontics

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The continuous development in dental processing ensures new opportunities in the field of fixed prosthodontics in a complete virtual environment without any physical model situations. The aim was to compare fully digitalized workflows to conventional and/or mixed analog-digital workflows for the treatment with tooth-borne or implant-supported fixed reconstructions.

Concepts: Virtual reality, Business process modeling, Prosthodontics, Fixed prosthodontics

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Digital dentistry has gained in popularity among clinicians and laboratory technicians because of its versatile applications. Three-dimensional (3D) printing has been applied in many areas of dentistry as it offers efficiency, affordability, accessibility, reproducibility, speed, and accuracy. This article describes a technique where 3D printing is used to fabricate a die-trimmed cast and to replicate gingival tissue and implant analogs. The digital workflow that replaces the conventional laboratory procedure is outlined.

Concepts: Inkjet printer, 3D printing, Fixed prosthodontics

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At present, three-dimensional (3D) printing has been applied in many aspects in the field of prosthodontics, such as dental models, wax patterns, guide plates, dental restoration and customized implants. The common forming principles include light curing, sintering and melting-condensation, the materials include pure wax, resin, metal and ceramics. However, the printing precision and the strength of multi-material integrated forming, remains to be improved. In addition, as a technology by which the internal structure of a material can be customized manufacturing, further advantage of 3D printing used in the manufacture of dental restoration lies in the customization functional bionic micro-structures, but the related research is still in its infancy. The review briefly summarizes the commonly used 3D printing crafts in prosthetic dentistry, and details clinical applications and evaluations, provides references for clinical decision and further research.

Concepts: Implants, Dental implant, Inkjet printer, Selective laser sintering, Rapid manufacturing, Prosthodontics, Dental technician, Fixed prosthodontics

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Crowns, fixed partial dentures, and removable dentures are the popular prosthetic dental restorations in current dental practice. Prosthodontic rehabilitation of the mouth, particularly in advanced and complex cases, requires careful planning, adequate clinical skills, and exacting technical standards. While a successful outcome is the ultimate goal for any prosthodontic treatment, complications, injuries, dissatisfaction, and/or failure may occur. When such events develop as a result of negligence or violation of standards of care, they are considered under the term of malpractice and may incur ethical and medico-legal implications. This paper reviews and highlights some aspects of malpractice in prosthodontics. The current state of prosthodontic malpractice on a global level will also be evaluated. Standards of prosthodontic care, current literature of prosthodontic malpractice, where and how prosthodontic malpractice occurs, and recommendations for the future are presented. A thorough understanding of what is quality prosthodontic care and what disrupts this care can be a useful guard against professional litigation and may protect patients from poor quality of dental prosthetic care.

Concepts: Dental implant, Dentures, American Dental Association, Prosthodontology, Prosthodontics, Dental technician, Palatal obturator, Fixed prosthodontics

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Although periodontal factors do not usually have a direct effect on the survival of a fixed prosthesis, harmony between the prosthesis and the periodontium is critical otherwise esthetics, the longevity of the prosthesis and the periodontium will be compromised. A close interdisciplinary relationship between periodontics and prosthodontics is therefore necessary to avoid an unsatisfactory treatment outcome, requiring extensive and expensive retreatment. The design of the prosthesis, the number and quality of the abutment teeth, the preparation and the pontic, the occlusion and the material need to be considered when planning prosthodontic treatment. The location of the preparation margin and the contour and emergence profile of the prosthesis will influence the response of the gingival tissues to the prosthesis. Pontic design and cleansibility also contribute to the response of the gingival tissues as well as to the clinical and esthetic outcome. Even an optimal pontic design will not prevent inflammation of the mucosa adjacent to the pontic if pontic hygiene is not maintained by removal of plaque. Case selection and the patients' ability to carry out adequate oral hygiene are therefore essential for longevity of the prosthesis, and regular reviews provide an opportunity for early detection and treatment of failures.

Concepts: Periodontology, Gingiva, Periodontitis, Periodontal disease, Dentures, Prosthodontics, Palatal obturator, Fixed prosthodontics

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Preclinical fixed prosthodontics is taught by Department of Prosthodontics faculty members at Virginia Commonwealth University School of Dentistry; however, 86% of all clinical cases in academic year 2012 were staffed by faculty members from the Department of General Practice. The aims of this retrospective study were to quantify the quality of impressions, accuracy of laboratory work authorizations, and most common errors and to determine if there were differences between the rate of errors in cases supervised by the prosthodontists and the general dentists. A total of 346 Fixed Prosthodontic Laboratory Tracking Sheets for the 2012 academic year were reviewed. The results showed that, overall, 73% of submitted impressions were acceptable at initial evaluation, 16% had to be poured first and re-evaluated for quality prior to pindexing, 7% had multiple impressions submitted for transfer dies, and 4% were rejected for poor quality. There were higher acceptance rates for impressions and work authorizations for cases staffed by prosthodontists than by general dentists, but the differences were not statistically significant (p=0.0584 and p=0.0666, respectively). Regarding the work authorizations, 43% overall did not provide sufficient information or had technical errors that delayed prosthesis fabrication. The most common errors were incorrect mountings, absence of solid casts, inadequate description of margins for porcelain fused to metal crowns, inaccurate die trimming, and margin marking. The percentages of errors in cases supervised by general dentists and prosthodontists were similar for 17 of the 18 types of errors identified; only for margin description was the percentage of errors statistically significantly higher for general dentist-supervised than prosthodontist-supervised cases. These results highlighted the ongoing need for faculty development and calibration to ensure students receive the highest quality education from all faculty members teaching fixed prosthodontics.

Concepts: University, Dentistry, Dentures, Prosthodontology, Prosthodontics, Palatal obturator, Fixed prosthodontics, Virginia Commonwealth University

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The aim of this retrospective study was to quantify differences between general dentists and prosthodontists regarding appointments, treatment time, impressions, and preoperative diagnostic data in teaching predoctoral clinical fixed prosthodontics. Electronic dental records (n=356) of patients treated at one dental school in academic year 2012 were randomly selected for review to obtain the following data: faculty and student demographics, number of appointments and treatment time from preparation to cementation, number of impressions made, completion of oral disease control treatment (ODCT), and presence of preoperative periapical radiographs and diagnostic casts. The results showed that ODCT was completed in 78%, preoperative radiographs were present in 76%, and diagnostic casts made in 53% of the cases reviewed. There was no statistically significant difference in number of appointments, treatment time, or number of final impressions when students were staffed by general dentists or prosthodontists. When students were supervised by multiple faculty members, there was generally an increase in treatment time and number of appointments and final impressions. Although this study found no statistically significant differences between general dentists and prosthodontists regarding the criteria evaluated, the results suggest that faculty development and calibration are needed to ensure ODCT is completed and preoperative radiographs are present prior to initiating fixed prosthodontic procedures.

Concepts: Statistics, Statistical significance, University, Dentistry, American Dental Association, Prosthodontology, Prosthodontics, Fixed prosthodontics

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Gingival displacement is recognized as a substantive and difficult procedure in fixed prosthodontics. However, a realistic simulation of gingival displacement is unavailable for preclinical dental students.

Concepts: Prosthodontics, Fixed prosthodontics