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Concept: Fiedler contingency model

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A recent shift towards more collective leadership in the NHS can help to achieve a culture of safety, particularly through encouraging frontline staff to participate and take responsibility for improving safety through learning from error and near misses. Leaders must ensure that they provide psychological safety, organizational fairness and learning systems for staff to feel confident in raising concerns, that they have the autonomy and skills to lead continual improvement, and that they have responsibility for spreading this learning within and across organizations.

Concepts: Skill, Management, Positive psychology, Leadership, Fiedler contingency model

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Aim This article reports the results of a study that gives an insight into ward leaders' perspectives of their leadership role and explores how they deliver leadership at ward level within organisational constraints and processes. Previous studies have been evaluations of clinical leadership in general, or literature reviews of the ward leader role. The aim of this study was to examine the leadership role of ward sisters and to understand how they lead improvements in quality of care on their wards. Methods A qualitative methodology was used, incorporating 19 in-depth interviews with ward leaders and modern matrons. Results Three main themes were identified: empty conformity, authority and autonomy, and visibility and leading by example. Participants aimed to be role models in leading and maintaining standards of care for patients, but this was sometimes constrained by organisational processes, lack of authority and autonomy, and lack of support and preparation. Conclusion Perceived differences between nursing and health service management mean that ward leaders' efforts to lead improvements in quality care are often undermined. Ward leaders must strike a balance between leading high-quality nursing care, in the context of organisational and political performance requirements, and the demands of administrative work, while often lacking autonomy and authority.

Concepts: Health care, Management, Strategic management, Leadership, Leader, Fiedler contingency model, Hero, Charismatic authority

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The aim of the study is to create a mixed-methods evaluation template to examine the educational experiences and outcomes of participants in the Nurse Manager Fellowship (NMF) sponsored by the American Organization of Nurse Executives (AONE) Foundation. The focus was to capture change as reported by the nurse manager (NM) fellows and the senior leaders who sponsored them and to gain access to the participants' lived experiences as leadership learners.

Concepts: Management, Leadership, Fiedler contingency model

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The 2016 International Nursing Administration Research Conference, Leading in a Healthcare Vortex, was held in Orlando, Florida. The program drew 116 attendees with representation from Canada and Brazil. Participants from practice, education, and research discussed leadership in our turbulent healthcare climate, which are highlighted in this column. The conference was dedicated to the memory of Dr Heather S. Laschinger in recognition of her distinguished research legacy of empowering nursing work environments and mentorship of prominent nursing administration researchers.

Concepts: Health, Research, Management, Leadership, Coaching, Vortex, 2016 Summer Olympics, Fiedler contingency model

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To suggest a methodical approach for refining transitional management abilities, including empowerment of a growing leader, leading in an unfamiliar organization or leading in an organization that is changing.

Concepts: Management, Strategic management, Leadership, Leader, Fiedler contingency model

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Purpose The purpose of this paper is to expand attention to responsible leader behavior in the world’s health sectors by explaining how this concept applies to health sectors, considering why health sector leaders should behave responsibly, reviewing how they can do so, and asserting potential impact through an applied example. Design/methodology/approach This paper is a viewpoint, reflecting conceptualizations rooted in leadership literature which are then specifically applied to health sectors. A definition of responsible leader behavior is affirmed and applied specifically in health sectors. Conceptualizations and viewpoints about practice of responsible leader behavior in health sectors and potential consequences are then discussed and asserted. Findings Leadership failures and debacles found in health, but more so in other sectors, have led leadership researchers to offer insights, many of them empirical, into the challenges of leadership especially by more clearly delineating responsible leader behavior. Practical implications Much of what has been learned in the research about responsible leader behavior offers pathways for health sector leaders to more fully practice responsible leadership. Social implications This paper asserts and provides a supporting example that greater levels of responsible leader behavior in health sectors hold potentially important societal benefits. Originality/value This paper is the first to apply emerging conceptualizations and early empirical findings about responsible leader behavior specifically to leaders in health sectors.

Concepts: Scientific method, Sociology, Research, Skill, Management, Leadership, Fiedler contingency model

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Purpose Despite the practice of dual leadership in many organizations, there is relatively little research on the topic. Dual leadership means two leaders share the leadership task and are held jointly accountable for the results of the unit. To better understand how dual leadership works, this study aims to analyse three different dual leadership pairs at a Danish hospital. Furthermore, this study develops a tool to characterize dual leadership teams from each other. Design/methodology/approach This is a qualitative study using semi-structured interviews. Six leaders were interviewed to clarify how dual leadership works in a hospital context. All interviews were transcribed and coded. During coding, focus was on the nine principles found in the literature and another principle was found by looking at the themes that were generic for all six interviews. Findings Results indicate that power balance, personal relations and decision processes are important factors for creating efficient dual leaderships. The study develops a categorizing tool to use for further research or for organizations, to describe and analyse dual leaderships. Originality/value The study describes dual leadership in the hospital context and develops a categorizing tool for being able to distinguish dual leadership teams from each other. It is important to reveal if there are any indicators that can be used for optimising dual leadership teams in the health-care sector and in other organisations.

Concepts: Research methods, Focus group, Evaluation methods, Management, Strategic management, Leadership, Semi-structured interview, Fiedler contingency model

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The influence of leaders' character (e.g., integrity, humility/forgiveness) has rarely been examined in leadership research. The current investigation focused on the impact of integrity and humility/forgiveness on both followers' perceptions of leaders' worthiness of being followed (WBF) and stress. Results from a scenario experiment (n = 347) and a field study (n = 110) indicated that these aspects incrementally predict WBF above and beyond the impact of transformational leadership. Similar results were found concerning followers' stress with the exception of leader integrity in the field study. According to relative importance analyses, integrity and transformational leadership predict WBF equally well. The results have conceivable implications for human resources (personnel selection and development). Future research should examine additional outcome variables that are affected by certain leader characteristics as well as potential negative effects of the examined character aspects.

Concepts: Management, Positive psychology, Leadership, Social influence, Organizational studies and human resource management, Fiedler contingency model, Hero

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Integrity, trust and authenticity are essential characteristics of an effective leader, demonstrated through a values-based approach to leadership. This article explores whether Covey’s (1989) principle-centred leadership model is a useful approach to developing doctors' leadership qualities and skills.

Concepts: Skill, Management, Positive psychology, Leadership, Fiedler contingency model

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Discrepancies, or perceptual distance, between leaders' self-ratings and followers' ratings of the leader are common but usually go unrecognized. Research on discrepancies is limited, but there is evidence that discrepancies are associated with organizational context. This study examined the association of leader-follower discrepancies in Implementation Leadership Scale (ILS) ratings of mental health clinic leaders and the association of those discrepancies with organizational climate for involvement and performance feedback. Both involvement and performance feedback are important for evidence-based practice (EBP) implementation in mental health.

Concepts: Management, Positive psychology, Leadership, Fiedler contingency model, Political science terms