SciCombinator

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Concept: Deltoid muscle

169

Changes in muscle activities are commonly associated with shoulder impingement and theoretically caused by changes in motor program strategies. The purpose of this study was to assess for differences in latencies and deactivation times of scapular muscles between subjects with and without shoulder impingement. Twenty-five healthy subjects and 24 subjects with impingement symptoms were recruited. Glenohumeral kinematic data and myoelectric activities using surface electrodes from upper trapezius (UT), lower trapezius (LT), serratus anterior (SA) and anterior fibers of deltoid were collected as subjects raised and lowered their arm in response to a visual cue. Data were collected during unloaded, loaded and after repetitive arm raising motion conditions. The variables were analyzed using 2 or 3 way mixed model ANOVAs. Subjects with impingement demonstrated significantly earlier contraction of UT while raising in the unloaded condition and an earlier deactivation of SA across all conditions during lowering of the arm. All subjects exhibited an earlier activation and delayed deactivation of LT and SA in conditions with a weight held in hand. The subjects with impingement showed some significant differences to indicate possible differences in motor control strategies. Rehabilitation measures should consider appropriate training measures to improve movement patterns and muscle control.

Concepts: Muscle, Humerus, Shoulder, Deltoid muscle, Clavicle, Glenohumeral joint, Scapula, Serratus anterior muscle

144

The aim of this study was to determine if there were significant differences in glenohumeral joint morphology between North American and East Asian populations that may influence sizing and selection of shoulder arthroplasty systems.

Concepts: Asia, Joints, Shoulder, North America, Asian American, Deltoid muscle, Glenohumeral joint

34

PURPOSE: It is commonly stated that supraspinatus initiates abduction; however, there is no direct evidence to support this claim. Therefore, the aims of the present study were to determine whether supraspinatus initiates shoulder abduction by activating prior to movement and significantly earlier than other shoulder muscles and to determine if load or plane of movement influenced the recruitment timing of supraspinatus. METHODS: Electromyographic recordings were taken from seven shoulder muscles of fourteen volunteers during shoulder abduction in the coronal and scapular planes and a plane 30° anterior to the scapular plane, at 25%, 50% and 75% of maximum load. Initial activation timing of a muscle was determined as the time at which the average activation (over a 25ms moving window) was greater than three standard deviations above baseline measures. RESULTS: All muscles tested were activated prior to movement onset. Subscapularis was activated significantly later than supraspinatus, infraspinatus, deltoid and upper trapezius, while supraspinatus, infraspinatus, upper trapezius, lower trapezius, serratus anterior and deltoid all had similar initial activation times. The effects of load or plane of movement were not significant. CONCLUSIONS: Supraspinatus is recruited prior to movement of the humerus into abduction but not earlier than many other shoulder muscles, including infraspinatus, deltoid and axioscapular muscles. The common statement that supraspinatus initiates abduction is therefore, misleading.

Concepts: Humerus, Shoulder, Rotator cuff, Supraspinatus muscle, Deltoid muscle, Muscles of the upper limb, Scapula, Serratus anterior muscle

31

The reverse fly machine is a popular exercise for strengthening the horizontal shoulder abductors including the posterior deltoid. . There seems to be little consensus as to which hand position most effectively targets the posterior deltoid despite this option on most machines. This study investigated the impact of varying one’s hand position, and consequently altering shoulder joint rotation, on muscle activity in various glenohumeral muscles during exercise on the reverse fly machine. Nineteen resistance trained men (mean age = 23.2 ± 4.3 years; height =176.9 ± 7.1 centimeters; body mass = 81.3 ± 10.5 kilograms; body mass index = 25.9 ± 2.6) were recruited from a university population to participate in the study. In a repeated measures design, subjects grasped the hand bars on the machine with either a pronated (PRO) or neutral (NEU) grip and performed dynamic horizontal abduction repetitions to muscular failure using a load equating to approximately 75% body weight. The order of performance of the hand positions was counterbalanced between participants so that approximately half of the subjects performed PRO first and the other half performed NEU first. Surface electromyography was used to record both mean and peak muscle activity of the posterior deltoid, middle deltoid, and infraspinatus. Results showed that mean EMG activity for the posterior deltoid was significantly greater in NEU compared to PRO (p = 0.046; 95% CI = 0.1 to 7.4% MVIC). Similarly, mean EMG activity of the infraspinatus also was significantly greater in NEU compared to PRO (p = 0.002; 95% CI = 3.7 to 13.6% MVIC). The results of this study show that performing exercise on the reverse fly machine with a neutral hand position significantly increases activity of the posterior deltoid and infraspinatus muscles compared to a pronated hand position.

Concepts: Muscle, Mass, Body mass index, Electromyography, Shoulder, Rotator cuff, Deltoid muscle, Glenohumeral joint

30

McAllister, MJ, Schilling, BK, Hammond, KG, Weiss, LW, and Farney, TM. Effect of grip width on electromyographic activity during the upright row. J Strength Cond Res 27(1): 181-187, 2013-The upright row (URR) is commonly used to develop the deltoid and upper back musculature. However, little information exists concerning muscle recruitment during variations of this exercise. Sixteen weight-trained men completed 2 repetitions each in the URR with 3 grip conditions: 50, 100, and 200% of the biacromial breadth (BAB). The load was the same for all grip conditions and was equal to 85% of the 1RM determined at 100% BAB. Repeated measures analyses of variance were used to compare the maximal activity of the anterior deltoid (AD), lateral deltoid (LD), posterior deltoid (PD), upper trapezius (UT), middle trapezius (MT), and biceps brachii (BB) during the 3 grip widths for eccentric and concentric actions. Significant differences (p < 0.05) were noted in concentric muscle activity for LD (p < 0.001) and PD (p < 0.001), and in eccentric muscle activity for AD (p = 0.023), LD (p < 0.001), UT (p < 0.001), MT (p < 0.001), and BB (p = 0.003). Bonferroni post hoc analysis revealed significant pairwise differences in the concentric actions from the LD (50% vs. 200% BAB and 100% vs. 200% BAB) and PD (50% vs. 200% BAB and 100% vs. 200% BAB), and eccentric actions of the LD (all comparisons), UT (all comparisons), MT (50% vs. 200% BAB and 100% vs. 200% BAB), and BB (50% vs. 200% BAB), with large-to-very-large effect sizes (ESs). Moderate-to-large ESs were noted for several nonsignificant comparisons. The main findings of this investigation are increased deltoid and trapezius activity with increasing grip width, and correspondingly less BB activity. Therefore, those who seek to maximize involvement of the deltoid and trapezius muscles during the URR should use a wide grip.

Concepts: Muscle, Biceps brachii muscle, Electromyography, Muscle contraction, Deltoid muscle, Muscles of the upper limb, Clavicle, Glenohumeral joint

28

The deltoid is a fascinating muscle with a significant role in shoulder function. It is comprised of three distinct portions (anterior or clavicular, middle or acromial, and posterior or spinal) and acts mainly as an abductor of the shoulder and stabilizer of the humeral head. Deltoid tears are not infrequently associated with large or massive rotator cuff tears and may further jeopardize shoulder function. A variety of other pathologies may affect the deltoid muscle including enthesitis, calcific tendinitis, myositis, infection, tumors, and chronic avulsion injury. Contracture of the deltoid following repeated intramuscular injections could present with progressive abduction deformity and winging of the scapula. The deltoid muscle and its innervating axillary nerve may be injured during shoulder surgery, which may have disastrous functional consequences. Axillary neuropathies leading to deltoid muscle dysfunction include traumatic injuries, quadrilateral space and Parsonage-Turner syndromes, and cause denervation of the deltoid muscle. Finally, abnormalities of the deltoid may originate from nearby pathologies of subdeltoid bursa, acromion, and distal clavicle.

Concepts: Humerus, Shoulder, Rotator cuff, Deltoid muscle, Axillary nerve, Clavicle, Scapula, Acromion

27

: Children with obstetrical brachial plexus injury often develop an internal rotation and adduction contracture about the shoulder as a secondary deformity, resulting in an inability to externally rotate and abduct the shoulder. The Hoffer procedure is evaluated for its potential benefit in improving shoulder abduction and external rotation and its impact on activities of daily living.

Concepts: Shoulder, Deltoid muscle, Brachial plexus, Abduction, Adduction

27

We describe our experience with a new system of patient-specific template called Personal Fit(®), which is unique in shoulder surgery and used in combination with Duocentric(®) prosthesis. The reverse prosthesis’s concept is the invention of Paul Grammont, developed with Grammont’s team of Dijon University as from 1981, which led to the first reversed total shoulder prosthesis called Trumpet in 1985. The Duocentric(®) prosthesis developed in 2001 is the third-generation prosthesis, coming from the Trumpet and the second-generation prosthesis Delta(®) (DePuy). This prosthesis provides a novel solution to the notching problem with an inferior overhang integrated onto the glenoid baseplate. Personal Fit(®) system is based on reconstructing the shoulder joint bones in three dimensions using CT scan data, placing a landmark on the scapula and locating points on the glenoid and humerus. That will be used as a reference for the patient-specific templates. We study the glenoid position planned with Personal Fit(®) software relative to native glenoid position in 30 cases. On average, the difference between the planned retroversion (or anteversion in one case) and native retroversion was 8.6°.

Concepts: Humerus, Joint, Shoulder, Rotator cuff, Deltoid muscle, Scapula, Acromion, Glenoid cavity

26

Shoulder pathology in adult tennis players including rotator cuff pathology is well known. However, early adaptations have not previously been studied in the adolescent elite tennis players.

Concepts: Shoulder, Rotator cuff, Rotator cuff tear, Deltoid muscle

25

To describe epidemiological data and evaluate the clinical results of traumatic anterior glenohumeral instability in rodeo athletes.

Concepts: Epidemiology, Shoulder, Deltoid muscle, Rodeo