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Concept: David Keirsey

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This study sought to determine whether using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) would detect differences in personality preferences in first-year dental students admitted to the same dental school through different admission methods. First-year dental students admitted in 2000 and 2001 were given the MBTI instrument during orientation prior to the start of classes. In fall 2000, the Class of 2004 had 140 students, with 116 in the traditional track and twenty-four in the parallel problem-based learning (PBL) track. In fall 2001, the Class of 2005 had 144 students, all enrolled in the PBL curriculum. All students admitted to the PBL track had experienced a process that included evaluation of their participation in a small group. Students in the traditional track had individual interviews with faculty members. Both student groups were required to meet the same baseline grade point average and Dental Admission Test standards. In 2000, the PBL students showed personality preferences that were distinctly different from the personality preferences of traditional track students in the categories of Extroversion (89 percent PBL, 44 percent traditional) and Thinking (72 percent PBL, 39 percent traditional). In 2001, the all-PBL class retained the trend towards Extroversion (69 percent). This study suggests that admission method may effectively change the personality preference distribution exhibited by the students who are admitted to dental school.

Concepts: Personality psychology, Psychometrics, Carl Jung, Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, David Keirsey, INFP, INFJ

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The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between personality preferences of incoming fourth-year dental students at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio as measured by the Keirsey Temperament Sorter II and their third-year clinical productivity and percentage of broken appointments. All 105 incoming fourth-year dental students in 2016 were invited to participate in the study, and 92 students completed the temperament questionnaire, for a response rate of 87.5%. Those students' clinical activity during their third year was measured by production points and percentage of broken appointments extracted from the electronic health record. The results showed that the majority of the respondents were extroverts rather than introverts and that the extroverts had significantly higher production points and significantly fewer broken appointments than the introverts. The most common personality preferences were sensing and judging. More than two-thirds of the respondents represented the Guardian temperament, one of four categories on the temperament measure. These findings help highlight the traits that may contribute to success in clinical training during dental school and support the notion that clinical success may be influenced by certain personality characteristics as well as the technical and specialized skills of dentistry.

Concepts: Keirsey Temperament Sorter, David Keirsey, Guardian temperament

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The aim of this study was to determine whether the personality types of dental students and their group dynamics were linked to their problem-based learning (PBL) performance. The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) instrument was used with 263 dental students enrolled in Seoul National University School of Dentistry from 2011 to 2013; the students had participated in PBL in their first year. A four-session PBL setting was designed to analyze how individual personality types and the diversity of their small groups were associated with PBL performance. Overall, the results showed that the personality type of PBL performance that was the most prominent was Judging. As a group became more diverse with its different constituent personality characteristics, there was a tendency for the group to be higher ranked in terms of PBL performance. In particular, the overperforming group was clustered around three major profiles: Extraverted Intuitive Thinking Judging (ENTJ), Introverted Sensing Thinking Judging (ISTJ), and Extraverted Sensing Thinking Judging (ESTJ). Personality analysis would be beneficial for dental faculty members in order for them to understand the extent to which cooperative learning would work smoothly, especially when considering group personalities.

Concepts: Personality psychology, Carl Jung, Socionics, Personality typologies, Keirsey Temperament Sorter, Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, David Keirsey, ISTJ

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This study attempts to assess the association between surgeon personality factors (measured by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator personality inventory (MBTI(®))) and risk tolerance (measured by the Revised Physicians' Reactions to Uncertainty (PRU) and Physician Risk Attitude (PRA) scales).

Concepts: Personality psychology, Risk, Physician, Psychometrics, Carl Jung, Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, Holland Codes, David Keirsey