SciCombinator

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Concept: Candidiasis

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Invasive aspergillosis remains a major cause of death among the immunocompromised population and those receiving long-term immunosuppressive therapy. In light of increased azole resistance, variable outcomes with existing echinocandin mono and combination therapy, and persistent high mortality rates, new antifungal agents for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis are clearly needed.SCY-078 is the first in class triterpenoid antifungal, a novel class of glucan synthase inhibitors, with broadin vitroandin vivoactivity against a broad spectrum ofCandidaandAspergillusIn vitrotesting of clinical strains ofAspergillus fumigatusand non-fumigatusstrains showed potent fungistatic activity of SCY-078 (minimum effective concentration, MEC90= 0.125 μg/ml) as compared with amphotericin B (MIC90= 8 μg/ml) and voriconazole (MIC90= 2 μg/ml). Combination testing of SCY-078 with isavuconazole or voriconazole demonstrated synergistic activity against the majority of the azole-susceptible strains tested, and SCY-078 in combination with amphotericin B was synergistic against the azole-susceptible strains, as well as one known resistantcyp51Amutant. SCY-078 may be an important additional antifungal for first-line or salvage mono or combination treatment of invasive aspergillosis.

Concepts: Candidiasis, Echinocandin, Mortality rate, Opportunistic infection, Aspergillosis, Ergosterol, Flucytosine, Antifungals

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The European Conference on Infections in Leukemia (ECIL) provides recommendations for diagnostic strategies and prophylactic, pre-emptive or targeted therapy strategies for various types of infection in patients with hematological malignancies or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients. Meetings are held every two years since 2005 and evidence-based recommendations are elaborated after evaluation of the literature and discussion among specialists of nearly all European countries. In this manuscript, the ECIL group presents the 2015-update of the recommendations for the targeted treatment of invasive candidiasis, aspergillosis and mucormycosis. Current data now allow a very strong recommendation in favor of echinocandins for first line therapy of candidemia irrespective of the underlying predisposing factors. Anidulafungin has been given the same grading as the other echinocandins for hemato-oncological patients. The beneficial role of catheter removal in candidemia is strengthened. Aspergillus guidelines now recommend the use of either voriconazole or isavuconazole for first line treatment of invasive aspergillosis, while first line combination antifungal therapy is not routinely recommended. As only few new data were published since the last ECIL guidelines, no major changes were brought to mucormycosis recommendations.

Concepts: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, Antifungals, Aspergillosis, Cancer, Bone marrow, Hematology, Chemotherapy, Candidiasis

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Candida glabrata is an infrequent cause of candidemia in Brazilian public hospitals. We investigated putative differences in the epidemiology of candidemia in institutions with different sources of funding. Prospective laboratory-based surveillance of candidemia was conducted in seven private and two public Brazilian tertiary care hospitals. Among 4,363 episodes of bloodstream infection, 300 were caused by Candida spp. (6.9%). Incidence rates were significantly higher in public hospitals, i.e., 2.42 vs. 0.91 episodes per 1,000 admissions (P< 0.01). Patients in private hospitals were older, more likely to be in an intensive care unit and to have been exposed to fluconazole before candidemia. Candida parapsilosis was more frequently recovered as the etiologic agent in public (33% vs. 16%, P< 0.001) hospitals, whereas C. glabrata was more frequently isolated in private hospitals (13% vs. 3%, P < 0.001). Fluconazole resistance among C. glabrata isolates was more frequent in private hospitals (76.5% vs. 20%, P = 0.02). The 30-day mortality was slightly higher among patients in public hospitals (53% vs. 43%, P = 0.10). Candida glabrata is an emerging pathogen in private institutions and in this setting, fluconazole should not be considered as a safe option for primary therapy of candidemia.

Concepts: Candida parapsilosis, Medicine, Candida glabrata, Yeast, Candida, Tertiary referral hospital, Candidiasis

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Candidemia is an important cause of morbidity and mortality. As statins interfere with yeast membrane synthesis, we assessed whether use of statins during candidemia may cause differences in clinical outcomes. A retrospective review of 124 candidemia episodes during 2003-2008 in which all-cause and attributable mortality, length of stay and level of care were compared for patients who received and those who did not receive statins. A total of 124 candidemia events were observed involving 14 patients on statins and 110 without statins. Overall mortality in candidemia cases was 46%, but only 2% was attributed to candidemia. No differences were observed in clinical outcomes for the two groups of patients. During the last 2-year period of our study, there were higher rates of candidemia caused by non-C. albicans Candida spp., particularly those due to C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis. In conclusion, statin use during candidemia did not alter mortality, length of stay, or intensive care requirement of our patients, despite higher rates of non-C. albicans Candida species isolated during the last 2 years of our study.

Concepts: Mortality rate, Retrospective, Candida parapsilosis, Candida krusei, Candida glabrata, Statin, Candidiasis, Candida albicans

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Candida famata (also known as Debaryomyces hansenii and Torulopsis candida) is a commensal yeast found in cheese, dairy products and the environment. C. famata accounts for 0.2%-2% of invasive candidiasis. The purpose of this study was to provide an overview of the treatment of C. famata bloodstream infections.

Concepts: Yeast, Milk, Candida krusei, Gut flora, Ecology, Candida, Candidiasis, Candida albicans

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Candidal adhesion has been implicated as the initial step in the pathogenesis of oral candidiasis and cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) has been implicated in adhesion to mucosal surfaces. Candida dubliniensis is an opportunistic pathogen associated with recurrent oral candidiasis. Chlorhexidine gluconate is by far the commonest antiseptic mouth wash prescribed in dentistry. At dosage intervals the intraoral concentration of this antiseptic fluctuates considerably and reaches sub-therapeutic levels due to the dynamics of the oral cavity. Hence, the organisms undergo only a limited exposure to the antiseptic during treatment. The impact of this antiseptic following such exposure on CSH of C. dubliniensis isolates has not been investigated. Hence, the main objective of this study was to investigate the effect of brief exposure to sub-therapeutic concentrations of chlorhexidine gluconate on the CSH of C. dubliniensis isolates. Twelve oral isolates of C. dubliniensis were briefly exposed to three sub-therapeutic concentrations of 0.005%, 0.0025% and 0.00125% chlorhexidine gluconate for 30 min. Following subsequent removal of the drug, the CSH of the isolates was determined by a biphasic aqueous-hydrocarbon assay. Compared with the controls, exposure to 0.005% and 0.0025% chlorhexidine gluconate suppressed the relative CSH of the total sample tested by 44.49% (P < 0.001) and 21.82% (P < 0.018), respectively, with all isolates being significantly affected. Although exposure to 0.00125% of chlorhexidine gluconate did not elicit a significant suppression on the total sample tested (7.01%; P > 0.05), four isolates of the group were significantly affected. These findings imply that exposure to sub-therapeutic concentrations of chlorhexidine gluconate may suppress CSH of C. dublinienis isolates, thereby reducing its pathogenicity and highlights further the pharmacodynamics of chlorhexidine gluconate.

Concepts: Suppression, Candidiasis, Gingivitis, Candida, Candida albicans, Chlorhexidine, Antiseptic, Mouthwash

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We set out to identify the prognostic factors in adult patients with Candida spp. bloodstream infection, assessing the impact on in-hospital mortality of catheter removal and adequacy of antifungal therapy.

Concepts: Hospital, Infection, Immune system, Candidiasis

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Rhodotorula species are emergent fungal pathogens capable of causing invasive infections, primarily fungemia. They are particularly problematic in immunosuppressed patients when using a central venous catheter. In this study, we evaluated the species distribution of 51 clinical and 8 environmental Rhodotorula species isolates using the ID32C system and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing. Antifungal susceptibility testing and biofilm formation capability using a crystal violet staining assay were performed. Using ITS sequencing as the gold standard, the clinical isolates were identified as follows: 44 R. mucilaginosa isolates, 2 R. glutinis isolates, 2 R. minuta isolates, 2 R. dairenensis isolates, and 1 Rhodosporidium fluviale isolate. The environmental isolates included 7 R. mucilaginosa isolates and 1 R. slooffiae isolate. Using the ID32C system, along with a nitrate assimilation test, only 90.3% of the isolates tested were correctly identified. In the biofilm formation assay, R. mucilaginosa and R. minuta exhibited greater biofilm formation ability compared to the other Rhodotorula species; the clinical isolates of R. mucilaginosa showed greater biofilm formation compared to the environmental isolates (P = 0.04). Amphotericin B showed good in vitro activity (MIC ≤ 1 μg/ml) against planktonic cells, whereas voriconazole and posaconazole showed poor activity (MIC(50)/MIC(90), 2/4 μg/ml). Caspofungin and fluconazole MICs were consistently high for all isolates tested (≥64 μg/ml and ≥ 4 μg/ml, respectively). In this study, we emphasized the importance of molecular methods to correctly identify Rhodotorula species isolates and non-R. mucilaginosa species in particular. The antifungal susceptibility profile reinforces amphotericin B as the antifungal drug of choice for the treatment of Rhodotorula infections. To our knowledge, this is the first study evaluating putative differences in the ability of biofilm formation among different Rhodotorula species.

Concepts: Antifungal drug, Molecular biology, Catheter, Biofilm, Ergosterol, Flucytosine, Candidiasis, Antifungals

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From a collection of yeast isolates isolated from patients in Tunisian hospitals between September 2006 and July 2010, the yeast strain JEY63 (CBS 12513), isolated from a 50-year-old male that suffered from oral thrush, could not be identified to the species level using conventional methods used in clinical laboratories. These methods include matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), germ tube formation, and the use of CHROMagar Candida and metabolic galleries. Sequence analysis of the nuclear rRNA (18S rRNA, 5.8S rRNA, and 26S rRNA) and internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS1 and ITS2) indicated that the ribosomal DNA sequences of this species were not yet reported. Multiple gene phylogenic analyses suggested that this isolate clustered at the base of the Dipodascaceae (Saccharomycetales, Saccharomycetes, and Ascomycota). JEY63 was named Candida tunisiensis sp. nov. according to several phenotypic criteria and its geographical origin. C. tunisiensis was able to grow at 42°C and does not form chlamydospores and hyphae but could grow as yeast and pseudohyphal forms. C. tunisiensis exhibited most probably a haploid genome with an estimated size of 10 Mb on at least three chromosomes. Using European Committee for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) and Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) Candida albicans susceptibility breakpoints as a reference, C. tunisiensis was resistant to fluconazole (MIC = 8 μg/ml), voriconazole (MIC = 0.5 μg/ml), itraconazole (MIC = 16 μg/ml), and amphotericin B (MIC = 4 μg/ml) but still susceptible to posaconazole (MIC = 0.008 μg/ml) and caspofungin (MIC = 0.5 μg/ml). In conclusion, MALDI-TOF MS permitted the early selection of an unusual isolate, which was still unreported in molecular databases but could not be unambiguously classified based on phylogenetic approaches.

Concepts: Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization, Gene, Ascomycota, Candida albicans, Candidiasis, DNA, Yeast, Ribosomal RNA

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In order to identify Trichosporon species in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded sections from which visual discrimination of non-glabrata Candida species is mostly ineffective but critical for the choice of antifungals, we tested the usefulness of a newly designed peptide nucleic acid probe (PNA) for in situ hybridization (ISH). Results confirmed the usefulness of ISH with our PNA probe in identifying Trichosporon species from Candida albicans.

Concepts: Candida albicans, Identification, Candidiasis