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Concept: CAD/CAM Dentistry

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SUMMARY Fracture resistance of inlays and onlays may be influenced by the quantity of the dental structure removed and the restorative materials used. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of two different cavity preparation designs and all-ceramic restorative materials on the fracture resistance of the tooth-restoration complex. Fifty mandibular third molar teeth were randomly divided into the following five groups: group 1: intact teeth (control); group 2: inlay preparations, lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic (IPS e.max Press, Ivoclar Vivadent AG, Schaan, Liechtenstein); group 3: inlay preparations, zirconia ceramic (ICE Zirkon, Zirkonzahn SRL, Gais, Italy); group 4: onlay preparations, lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic (IPS e.max Press); and group 5: onlay preparations, zirconia ceramic (ICE Zirkon). The inlay and onlay restorations were adhesively cemented with dual polymerizing resin cement (Variolink II, Ivoclar Vivadent AG). After thermal cycling (5° to 55°C × 5000 cycles), specimens were subjected to a compressive load until fracture at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Statistical analyses were performed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey HSD tests. The fracture strength values were significantly higher in the inlay group (2646.7 ± 360.4) restored with lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic than those of the onlay group (1673.6 ± 677) restored with lithium-disilicate glass-ceramic. The fracture strength values of teeth restored with inlays using zirconia ceramic (2849 ± 328) and onlays with zirconia ceramic (2796.3 ± 337.3) were similar to those of the intact teeth (2905.3 ± 398.8). In the IPS e.max Press groups, as the preparation amount was increased (from inlay to onlay preparation), the fracture resistance was decreased. In the ICE Zirkon ceramic groups, the preparation type did not affect the fracture resistance results.

Concepts: Touring car racing, FIA, Teeth, Analysis of variance, Crown, Dental restoration, CAD/CAM Dentistry, Inlays and onlays

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Alveolar distraction osteogenesis (ADO), a novel bone augmentation technique, is gaining acceptance in restoring the vertical bone discrepancy between the transplanted graft and the residual alveolar bone after mandibular reconstruction. This case series presents the outcomes of ADO in fibula-reconstructed mandibles rehabilitated with dental implants, with an emphasis on clinical indications, surgical protocol, clinical outcomes, histologic evidence, and complications.

Concepts: Implants, Dental implant, Dentistry, Oral and maxillofacial surgery, Osseointegration, CAD/CAM Dentistry

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Background The authors describe our current practice of computer-aided virtual planned and pre-executed surgeries using microvascular free tissue transfer with immediate placement of implants and dental prosthetics.Methods All patients with ameloblastomas treated at New York University (NYU) Medical Center during a 10-year period from September 2001 to December 2011 were identified. Of the 38 (36 mandible/2 maxilla) patients that were treated in this time period, 20 were identified with advanced disease (giant ameloblastoma) requiring aggressive resection. Reconstruction of the resultant defects utilized microvascular free tissue transfer with an osseocutaneous fibular flap in all 20 of these patients.Results Of the patients reconstructed with free vascularized tissue transfer, 35% (7/20) developed complications. There were two complete flap failures with consequent contralateral fibula flap placement. Sixteen patients to date have undergone placement of endosteal implants for complete dental rehabilitation, nine of which received immediate placement of the implants at the time of the free flap reconstruction. The three most recent patients received immediate placement of dental implants at the time of microvascular free tissue transfer as well as concurrent placement of dental prosthesis.Conclusions To our knowledge, this patient cohort represents the largest series of comprehensive computer aided free-flap reconstruction with dental restoration for giant type ameloblastoma.

Concepts: Implants, Computer-aided design, Dental implant, Dentistry, Oral and maxillofacial surgery, Periodization, Free flap, CAD/CAM Dentistry

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Routine reconstruction of subtotal defects of the mandible and orthopedic rehabilitation supported by dental implants is achieved by means of detailed planning and lasts over a year. This article shows the outcomes of single-stage surgical treatment and immediate orthopedic rehabilitation performed with the help of preoperative virtual computer simulation. 3D investigation of pathological and donor sites, virtual simulation of tumor resection, positioning of the dental implants into fibula, virtual flap bending and transfer, virtual bending of fixing reconstruction plates, and fabrication of navigation templates and bridge prosthesis supported by dental implants were done preoperatively. The surgery included tumor resection, insertion of dental implants into fibula, elevation of fibula osteocutaneous free flap, rigid fixation within recipient site, and immediate loading by bridge orthopedic device. On 10-month follow-up, functional and esthetic results were asses as reasonable. Radiography showed dental implants to be integrated and positioned appropriately. We found that successful rehabilitation of the patients with extensive defects of the jaws could be achieved by ablative tumor resection, dental implants insertion prior to flap elevation guided by navigation templates, further osteotomy, modeling of the flap based on navigation template, flap transfer, and rigid fixation within recipient site by prebended plates, with application of prefabricated prosthesis.

Concepts: Implants, Prosthetics, Computer simulation, Dental implant, Dentistry, Oral and maxillofacial surgery, CAD/CAM Dentistry, Nobel Biocare

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The aim of this study was to evaluate the microstructure and mechanical behavior of polymer-infiltrated zirconia ceramics as a function of pre-sintering temperature (1000-1150°C).

Concepts: Tooth enamel, Ceramic materials, Crown, Dental restoration, CAD/CAM Dentistry, Zirconium dioxide, Bridge, Inlays and onlays

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Preclinical dental students must demonstrate aptitude in the preparation of teeth for treatment with several types of fixed dental prostheses. The optimal sequence of instruction and examination of these crown preparations in preclinical fixed prosthodontics is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine if grading scores by faculty and students were affected by changing the sequence of crown type preparations. Practical exams of two successive student cohorts (n=89 in 2014; n=92 in 2015) at one U.S. dental school using three crown preparations (full cast, porcelain fused to metal, and all-ceramic) in different order were analyzed by faculty grades and student self-assessment. All of the models indicated that the sequence in which the crown type preparations were taught did have an effect on the grades. The 2014 cohort had overall higher grades and particularly higher grades for the all-ceramic crown preparations. Evaluation scores were affected by the sequence in which the different crown type preparations were taught and tested. Although the overall results suggested that students may perform better if the all-ceramic crown preparation is taught last, this tendency may differ between years.

Concepts: Crown, Dental restoration, Restorative dentistry, CAD/CAM Dentistry, Bridge, Prosthodontology, Inlays and onlays, Fixed prosthodontics

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The dental market moves towards high-translucency monolithic zirconia dental crowns, which are usually placed either with - or without - a thin glaze layer. The microstructural features and the mechanical performances of these materials are still controversial, as well as their susceptibility to aging. This paper aims at studying these aspects in the current generation of zirconia dental crowns showing different degrees of translucency.

Concepts: Crown, Sintering, Dental restoration, CAD/CAM Dentistry, Zirconium dioxide, Bridge, Porcelain, Inlays and onlays

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Sinus augmentation is a routine procedure performed in patients presenting with severe atrophy of the posterior maxillary alveolar ridge who seek dental implant surgery. Although this strategy is successful in large part, complications such as maxillary sinusitis, antral bleeding, resorption of graft material, infection, failure of implant installation, and oroantral fistula formation are documented on occasion. However, reports of postoperative maxillary cyst (POMC) arising after sinus augmentation are rare. Described herein is a rare and large case of POMC formation after sinus augmentation. A brief review of the pertinent literature is included.

Concepts: Implants, Dental implant, Maxillary sinus, Dentistry, Oral and maxillofacial surgery, Osseointegration, CAD/CAM Dentistry, Sinus augmentation

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The goal of this investigation was to evaluate the bone-to-implant contact (BIC) of dental implants placed into fresh extraction sockets without pre-existing periapical pathology. When the extraction sites exhibited a gap distance of > 2 mm, autogenous bone harvested from surrounding surgical sites was grafted to fill that gap with no barrier membranes. All implants were clinically stable and successful at 6 months postoperative. The histologic examination demonstrated an average of 66.2% BIC for all five immediately placed dental implants. The results of this study provided sufficient histologic and histomorphometric knowledge to support immediate dental implant placement in carefully selected clinical scenarios.

Concepts: Implants, Dental implant, Dentistry, Oral and maxillofacial surgery, Osseointegration, CAD/CAM Dentistry

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The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to evaluate the survival rate, the marginal bone level, and the aesthetic outcome; at 3 years' follow-up, of dental implants placed into a high-esthetic aesthetic zone by comparing 2 techniques of postextraction implant with immediate loading: the socket shied technique and the conventional insertion technique.Several clinical studies suggested that the avulsion of a dental element causes dimensional alterations of both soft and hard tissues at the postextractive site. To increase the aesthetic outcomes, the “socket-shield technique” has been proposed. This method involves maintaining the vestibular root portion and immediate insertion of the dental implant in close proximity to the root.Patients enrolled in this study were randomized to receive a postextraction implant in the aesthetic zone, either with the socket shied technique or with the conventional insertion technique. Implant survival, marginal bone level, and the pink aesthetic score were the outcomes evaluated.Implant survival rate was 100% in both the groups at 3 years. Implants inserted with the socket shield technique showed better values of both marginal bone level and pink aesthetic score (P < 0.05).Although such preliminary results need to be further confirmed, the socket shield technique seems to be a safe surgical technique that allows an implant rehabilitation characterized by better aesthetic outcomes.

Concepts: Clinical trial, Randomized controlled trial, Implants, Dental implant, Dentistry, Oral and maxillofacial surgery, Osseointegration, CAD/CAM Dentistry