SciCombinator

Discover the most talked about and latest scientific content & concepts.

Concept: Axillary vein

0

We sought to describe the caliber and vascular health of the subclavian and axillary arteries as related to their potential utilization in complex cardiovascular procedures.

Concepts: Subclavian artery, Axillary artery, Axillary vein

0

The axillary vein is a good site for ultrasound-guided central venous cannulation in terms of infection rate, patient comfort and its anatomical relationship with the clavicle and lungs. We compared real-time ultrasound-guided axillary vein cannulation with conventional infraclavicular landmark-guided subclavian vein cannulation in children. A total of 132 paediatric patients were randomly allocated to either ultrasound-guided axillary vein (axillary group) or landmark-guided subclavian vein (landmark group). The outcomes measured were success rate after two attempts, first-attempt success rate, time to cannulation and complication rate. The success rate after two attempts was 83% in the axillary group compared with 63% in the landmark group (odds ratio 2.85, 95%CI 1.25-6.48, p = 0.010). The first-attempt success rate was 46% for the axillary group and 40% for the landmark group (p = 0.274) and median time to cannulation was 156 s for the axillary group and 180 s for the landmark group (p = 0.286). There were no differences in complication rates between the two groups, although three episodes of subclavian artery puncture occurred in the landmark group (p = 0.08). We conclude that axillary vein cannulation using a real-time ultrasound-guided in-plane technique is useful and effective in paediatric patients.

Concepts: Blood, Heart, Randomized controlled trial, Vein, Subclavian vein, Subclavian artery, Axillary artery, Axillary vein

0

The axillary artery aneurysm (AxAAs) is a rare entity, with a diverse range of proposed etiologic mechanisms. Although usually asymptomatic, thrombo-embolic or haemorrhagic complications leave many with vascular and neurologic compromise. Both open and endovascular approaches have been reported. However, no consensus has been reached on the management of AxAAs. This case illustrates a unique emergent treatment approach for a ruptured axillary artery aneurysm, involving endovascular plugging, and immediate subsequent open hematoma evacuation. Although there was no restoration of vessel continuity, reasonable recovery of motor function upon follow-up suggests this treatment approach may be considered in emergent settings.

Concepts: Mathematics, Function, Greek loanwords, Continuous function, Motor skill, Open set, Axillary artery, Axillary vein

0

Paget-Schrotter Syndrome (PSS) also known as “effort thrombosis” is a form of primary thrombosis in the subclavian vein at the costoclavicular junction is usually seen in younger patients after repeated strenuous activity of the shoulders and arms. When occurring in younger patients, PSS presents itself with predisposing factors such as unilateral dull, aching pain in the shoulder or axilla and swelling of the arm and hand.

Concepts: Stroke, Thrombosis, Vein, Low molecular weight heparin, Inferior vena cava, Deep vein thrombosis, Deep vein, Axillary vein

0

Subclavian and axillary artery injuries are uncommon. In addition to many open vascular repairs, endovascular techniques are used for definitive repair or vascular control of these anatomically challenging injuries. The aim of this study was to determine the relative roles of endovascular and open techniques in the management of subclavian and axillary artery injuries comparing hospital outcomes, and long-term limb viability.

Concepts: Control, Subclavian vein, Subclavian artery, Axillary artery, Axillary vein

0

Transposed basilic vein arteriovenous fistulas suffer from stenosis at their basilic angle of transposition (BAT). This lesion exhibits frequent recurrence after angioplasty. The primary goal of this study was to determine the effect of stent-graft placement on BAT lesion- and access-patency. The secondary goals were to determine the frequency of intervention pre- and post-stent placement and stent-associated stenosis.

Concepts: Stent, Arteriovenous fistula, Fistula, Superficial vein, Axillary vein, Goal, Dorsal venous network of hand, Basilic vein

0

Although the cephalic vein follows a fairly consistent course, numerous variants have been reported. We found a rare anatomical presentation of the cephalic vein in a 75-year-old Korean male cadaver. The left cephalic vein was identified in the deltopectoral groove, ascended over the clavicle, and terminated into the left subclavian vein just before its union with the left internal jugular vein. The detailed knowledge on the variations of the cephalic vein is important for clinicians as well as anatomists since the approach through the axillary base is favored in many invasive clinical procedures.

Concepts: Internal jugular vein, Jugular vein, Central venous catheter, Subclavian vein, Brachiocephalic vein, Subclavian artery, Axillary vein, Cephalic vein

0

A 43-year-old man had a peritoneovenous shunt inserted for the treatment of chylous ascites secondary to myelofibrosis. Despite being on anticoagulation for superior mesenteric vein thrombosis, he developed shunt dysfunction within two weeks of insertion. Superior venacavography showed multiple filling defects in the right axillary vein, no filling of the right brachiocephalic and right subclavian vein, and thrombotic occlusion of the internal jugular veins bilaterally. The shunt was removed 11 days after insertion, and there was extensive thrombosis of the venous end of the shunt and the compressible pump chamber. Shunt thrombosis is known to occur but remains a rare complication, with 87% of such obstructions being due to a thrombus at the tip of the venous end of the shunt. Extensive thrombosis of the shunt (as in the present case) is very rare.

Concepts: Ascites, Internal jugular vein, Hepatic portal vein, Subclavian vein, Brachiocephalic vein, Subclavian artery, Axillary vein, Veins of the torso

0

When permanent pacemaker implantation is not possible or advisable via superior venous access (i.e., axillary or subclavian veins), safe and feasible surgical alternatives are required. The femoral approach is relatively unknown and seldom studied. This single-centre study analysed 10-year outcomes of a femoral implantation approach.

Concepts: Vein, Subclavian vein, Deep vein thrombosis, Deep vein, Artificial pacemaker, Subclavian artery, Axillary vein, Veins

0

Percutaneous subclavian, axillary, and cephalic vein access are all used in conjunction for atrial and ventricular lead implantation, though no standard approach for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) device implantation has been established. We describe an effective and a safe technique for implanting three leads via cephalic vein for CRT pacemaker and/or defibrillator implantations.

Concepts: Blood, Heart, Device, Implantation, Axillary vein, Cephalic vein