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Concept: Aphthous ulcer

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BACKGROUND: Oral lichen planus (OLP) is seen frequently in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of oral candidiasis, other mucosal lesions, and xerostomia during interferon (IFN) therapy for HCV infection. METHODS: Of 124 patients with HCV-infected liver diseases treated with IFN therapy in our hospital, 14 (mean age 56.00 +/- 12.94 years) who attended to receive administration of IFN once a week were identified and examined for Candida infection and other oral lesions and for the measurement of salivary flow. Serological assays also were carried out. RESULTS: Cultures of Candida from the tongue surfaces were positive in 7 (50.0%) of the 14 patients with HCV infection at least once during IFN therapy. C. albicans was the most common species isolated. The incidence of Candida during treatment with IFN did not increase above that before treatment. Additional oral mucosal lesions were observed in 50.0% (7/14) of patients: OLP in three (21.4%), angular cheilitis in three (21.4%) and recurrent aphthous stomatitis in one (7.1%). OLP occurred in one patient before treatment with IFN, in one during treatment and in one at the end of treatment. 85.7% of the oral lesions were treated with topical steroids. We compared the characteristics of the 7 patients in whom Candida was detected at least once during IFN therapy (group 1) and the 7 patients in whom Candida was not detected during IFN therapy (group 2). The prevalence of oral mucosal lesions (P=0.0075) and incidence of external use of steroids (P=0.0308) in group 1 were significantly higher than in group 2. The average body weight of group 1 decreased significantly compared to group 2 (P=0.0088). Salivary flow decreased in all subjects throughout the course of IFN treatment and returned at 6th months after the end of treatment. In group 1, the level of albumin at the beginning of the 6th month of IFN administration was lower than in group 2 (P=0.0550). According to multivariate analysis, one factor, the presence of oral mucosal lesions, was associated with the detection of Candida. The adjusted odds ratio for the factor was 36.00 (95% confidence interval 2.68-1485.94). CONCLUSION: We should pay more attention to oral candidiasis as well as other oral mucosal lesions, in patients with weight loss during IFN treatment.

Concepts: Interferon, Hepatitis C, Candida albicans, Candidiasis, Aphthous ulcer, Oral pathology, Lichen planus, Stomatitis

28

BACKGROUND:: Patients with Celiac Disease (CD) have a wide variety of symptoms, from being asymptomatic to having chronic diarrhea, abdominal pain and extra-intestinal symptoms. In the oral cavity, enamel defects and recurrent aphthous stomatitis are the most common symptoms. AIM:: To assess oral health, bacterial colonization and salivary buffering capacity of patients with CD at diagnosis were compared with CD patients on gluten free diet (GFD) and healthy children. METHODS:: Three groups were prospectively investigated: newly diagnosed celiac disease, celiac disease treated with GFD and a control group. All children were examined by pediatric dentists and saliva samples were collected for bacterial and pH analysis. RESULT:: Ninety children were enrolled in the study, thirty in each group. A higher prevalence of enamel hypoplasia (66%) was found in celiac children. Plaque Index was significantly lower in the celiac treated group, which correlated with oral health behavior: teeth brushing and frequency of eating between meals. Children on GFD brushed their teeth and used fluoride significantly more often than other children in the study. No difference between groups was found in snacks consumption, Mutans Streptococci and Lactobacilli counts in saliva, as well as pH and buffer capacity, CONCLUSIONS:: A lower degree of plaque was found in celiac children on GFD. This finding could not be explained by salivary properties or bacteria, but rather by better oral hygiene. The results should raise the awareness of pediatric gastroenterologists to oral health related issues in children with CD.

Concepts: Bacteria, Wheat, Crohn's disease, Buffer solution, Coeliac disease, Gluten, Aphthous ulcer, Gluten-free diet

27

Microstomia is a term used to describe a small oral aperture. Most of the reported cases are caused by scar contracture after facial trauma, burn injury, and tumor excision. We experienced a rare case of microstomia in a patient with antilaminin 332 mucous membrane pemphigoid, which was an acquired autoimmune disease and showed blisters and erosive lesions mainly on the mucous membranes. The patient had recurrent aphthous stomatitis and presented microstomia caused by scar contracture of oral mucosa. We surgically corrected microstomia by 5-flap Z-plasty for commissuroplasty and 2 Z-plasty of both upper and lower lips for an enlargement of oral aperture. The patient could achieve an enough oral aperture and was satisfied with the result. There was no recurrence of microstomia for 2 years.

Concepts: Mucous membrane, Oral mucosa, Aphthous ulcer, Lip, Stomatitis

2

Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is a common oral mucosal disorder of unclear etiopathogenesis. Although recent studies of the oral microbiota by high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes have suggested that imbalances in the oral microbiota may contribute to the etiopathogenesis of RAS, no specific bacterial species associated with RAS have been identified. The present study aimed to characterize the microbiota in the oral mucosa and saliva of RAS patients in comparison with control subjects at the species level.

Concepts: DNA, Archaea, Bacteria, Oral mucosa, Ribosomal RNA, 16S ribosomal RNA, Aphthous ulcer, Stomatitis

1

Minor Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis (RAS) represents a disease which is very difficult to prevent. This case-control study focused on possible associations between minor Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis in children, their oral health, and underlying behavioral indexes of children’s attitudes and habits pertaining to (home) oral hygiene, with the further goal of enabling the dentist to prevent these specific kind of lesions, both from a clinical and a broader psychosocial perspective.

Concepts: Epidemiology, The Association, Aphthous ulcer, Stomatitis

1

Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is a common disease of the oral mucosa with an unknown etiology. This study aimed to determine if food additives play a role in the etiology of RAS as well as to determine if patch testing can be used to detect which allergens cause RAS.

Concepts: Oral mucosa, Aphthous ulcer, Stomatitis

1

The syndrome of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis (PFAPA syndrome) is the most common cause of periodic fever in childhood. The current pharmacological treatment includes corticosteroids, which usually are efficacious in the management of fever episodes, colchicine, for the prophylaxis of febrile episodes, and other medication for which efficacy has not been proven so far. Tonsillectomy is an option for selected patients. Usually PFAPA syndrome resolves during adolescence, but there is increasing evidence that this condition may persist into adulthood.

Concepts: Aphthous ulcer

0

Diagnosis of Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) is currently based on a set of criteria proposed in 1999 modified from Marshall’s criteria. Nevertheless no validated evidence based set of classification criteria for PFAPA has been established so far. The aim of this study was to identify candidate classification criteria PFAPA syndrome using international consensus formation through a Delphi questionnaire survey.

Concepts: The Canon of Medicine, Evidence-based medicine, Aphthous ulcer, Oral ulcer, Stomatitis, Periodic fever syndrome

0

Behçet’s disease (BD) is a rare systemic vasculitis characterized by oral aphthous ulcers, genital ulcers, ocular lesions and other systemic manifestations. BD occurs most frequently in Eurasian populations along the ancient trading route known as the “Silk Road” which extends from eastern Asia to the Mediterranean basin. The causes of BD are unknown: it is believed to be due to an autoimmune process triggered by an infectious or environmental agent in a genetically predisposed individual. HLA-B51 allele located in the MHC locus, on chromosome 6p has been the most strongly associated risk factor for BD in areas along the Old Silk Route. Herpes simplex virus-1 and Streptococcus have been postulated as possible environmental triggers of BD. T cell homeostasis perturbation, especially Th1 and Th17 expansions and decrease regulation by Tregs are now supposed to be the cornerstone of BD pathogenesis. The histology shows vasculitis that involves both arteries and veins, and vessels of any size. BD is a systemic vasculitis with significant neutrophil infiltration, endothelial cell swelling, and fibrinoid necrosis. The diagnosis of BD is only supported by clinical criteria and requires the exclusion of other diagnoses based on clinical presentation. There are no pathognomonic laboratorial findings of BD. This rare disease often leads to blindness and fatal systemic involvement. Main causes of death include major vessel disease and central nervous system involvement (Neuro-Behcet). Corticosteroids are commonly used to treat clinical manifestations of BD in combination with immunosuppressant drugs. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-blocking agents such as Infliximab, Etanercept, and Adalimumab have been reported to have success in patients with BD.

Concepts: Immune system, Inflammation, Nervous system, Blood vessel, Rheumatoid arthritis, Psoriasis, Aphthous ulcer, Adalimumab

0

Behcet’s disease (BD) patients should have recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) but they may or may not have atrophic glossitis (AG). This study mainly assessed the frequencies of serum gastric parietal cell antibody (GPCA), thyroglobulin antibody (TGA), and thyroid microsomal antibody (TMA) positivities in 30 AG-positive RAS/BD (AG+RAS/BD) and 33 AG-negative RAS/BD (AG־RAS/BD) patients.

Concepts: Aphthous ulcer, Oral pathology, Parietal cell, Stomatitis