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Concept: Anti-psychiatry

170

BACKGROUND: Patients with schizophrenia and their families have suffered greatly from stigmatizing effects. Although many efforts have been made to eradicate both prejudice and stigma, they still prevail even among medical professionals, and little is known about how contact with schizophrenia patients affects their attitudes towards schizophrenia. METHODS: We assessed the impact of the renaming of the Japanese term for schizophrenia on clinical residents and also evaluated the influence of contact with schizophrenia patients on attitudes toward schizophrenia by comparing the attitudes toward schizophrenia before and after a one-month clinical training period in psychiatry. Fifty-one clinical residents participated. Their attitudes toward schizophrenia were assessed twice, before and one month after clinical training in psychiatry using the Implicit Association Test (IAT) as well as Link’s devaluation-discrimination scale. RESULTS: The old term for schizophrenia, “Seishin-Bunretsu-Byo”, was more congruent with criminal than the new term for schizophrenia, “Togo-Shitcho-Sho”, before clinical training. However, quite opposite to our expectation, after clinical training the new term had become even more congruent with criminal than the old term. There was no significant correlation between Link’s scale and IAT effect. CONCLUSIONS: Renaming the Japanese term for schizophrenia still reduced the negative images of schizophrenia among clinical residents. However, contact with schizophrenia patients unexpectedly changed clinical residents' attitudes towards schizophrenia negatively. Our results might contribute to an understanding of the formation of negative attitudes about schizophrenia and assist in developing appropriate clinical training in psychiatry that could reduce prejudice and stigma concerning schizophrenia.

Concepts: Health care provider, Medicine, Effect, Effectiveness, Implicit Association Test, Anti-psychiatry, Mental status examination

37

Perceptions of dangerousness are an influential component of mental health stigma and can be driven by the display of psychiatric symptoms and the use of psychiatric service institutions. Yet, no previous study compared symptoms and service use associated perceptions of dangerousness. Therefore, we conducted a representative survey (Nā€‰=ā€‰2,207) in the canton of Basel-Stadt, Switzerland. Participants were asked to answer the perceived dangerousness scale with respect to a vignette that either depicted psychiatric symptoms of a fictitious character or a psychiatric service institution the fictitious character had been admitted to. Between the vignettes, type of symptoms, type of psychiatric service, dangerousness, and gender were systematically varied. Perceived dangerousness was significantly lower as related to psychiatric service use than related to psychiatric symptoms. Overall, symptoms of alcohol dependency, behavior endangering others, and male gender of the fictitious character tend to increase perceived dangerousness. Furthermore, being hospitalized in a psychiatric unit at a general hospital or the rater being familiar with psychiatric services tends to decrease perceived dangerousness. Effective anti-stigma initiatives should integrate education about dangerousness as well as methods to increase familiarity with psychiatry. Additionally, an integration of modern psychiatry in somato-medical care institutions might decrease stigmatization.

Concepts: Psychology, Mental health, Sociology, Mental disorder, Switzerland, Psychiatry, Anti-psychiatry, Psychiatric hospital

26

In the 1960s Franco Basaglia, the Director of a Psychiatric Hospital in a small city on the edge of Italy (Gorizia), began to transform that institution from the inside. He introduced patient meetings and set up a kind of Therapeutic Community. In 1968 he asked two photographers - Carla Cerati and Gianni Berengo Gardin - to take photos inside Gorizia and other asylums. These images were then used in a photobook called Morire di Classe (To Die Because of your Class) (1969). This article re-examines in detail the content of this celebrated book and its history, and its impact on the struggle to reform and abolish large-scale psychiatric institutions. It also places the book in its social and political context and as a key text of the anti-psychiatry movement of the 1960s.

Concepts: Hospital, Mental disorder, Psychiatry, Anti-psychiatry, Psychiatric hospital, Involuntary commitment, Deinstitutionalisation, Psychiatric survivors movement

25

The Forensic Therapeutic Outpatient Clinic (FTA) in Berlin targets the professional aftercare treatment of classified high-risk violent and sexual offenders released from prison or forensic psychiatric hospitals.

Concepts: Hospital, Mental disorder, Psychiatry, Anti-psychiatry, Clinic, Psychiatric hospital, Involuntary commitment, Deinstitutionalisation

23

Studies indicate that risk of mortality is higher for patients admitted to acute hospitals at the weekend. However, less is known about clinical outcomes among patients admitted to psychiatric hospitals.

Concepts: Patient, Hospital, Mental disorder, Psychiatry, Anti-psychiatry, Psychiatric hospital, Involuntary commitment, Deinstitutionalisation

11

In response to queries about whether brain imaging technology has reached the point where it is useful for making a clinical diagnosis and for helping to guide treatment selection, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) has recently written a position paper on the Clinical Application of Brain Imaging in Psychiatry. The following perspective piece is based on our contribution to this APA position paper, which specifically emphasized the application of neuroimaging in mood disorders. We present an introductory overview of the challenges faced by researchers in developing valid and reliable biomarkers for psychiatric disorders, followed by a synopsis of the extant neuroimaging findings in mood disorders, and an evidence-based review of the current research on brain imaging biomarkers in adult mood disorders. Although there are a number of promising results, by the standards proposed below, we argue that there are currently no brain imaging biomarkers that are clinically useful for establishing diagnosis or predicting treatment outcome in mood disorders.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 2 April 2013; doi:10.1038/mp.2013.25.

Concepts: Psychology, Medical imaging, Neuroimaging, Neuroscience, Mental disorder, Psychiatry, Anti-psychiatry, American Psychiatric Association

8

There is a relative paucity of information on both empirical and subjective treatment strategies for treatment-resistant depression (TRD), especially in late life. This paper reviews the findings from two 2016 surveys conducted through the American Psychiatric Association publication the Psychiatric Times and via a member survey by the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry (AAGP).

Concepts: Medicine, Geriatrics, Psychiatry, Anti-psychiatry, Mental status examination, American Psychiatric Association, Robert Spitzer, Geriatric psychiatry

5

The quality of the therapeutic relationship between psychiatric patients and their attending physicians plays a key role in treatment success. We hypothesize that mandatory treatment is negatively associated with the quality of the therapeutic relationship. In a cross-sectional study design, data on psychopathological symptom load (as captured with the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale) and on the quality of the therapeutic relationship (as measured with the Scale to Assess the Therapeutic Relationship) were collected from 113 adult male psychiatric patients and 35 attending physicians. Patients belonged to one of three groups: self-referred or involuntarily admitted patients from general psychiatry wards or patients from medium secure forensic psychiatric units. On average, self-referred patients rated the quality of the therapeutic relationship significantly more positive than did involuntarily admitted patients in general psychiatry wards. Forensic psychiatric patients, on average, gave an intermediate rating of the quality of the therapeutic relationship. There was no association between patients' ratings and physicians' ratings of the quality of the therapeutic relationship. Patients' ratings of the quality of the therapeutic relationship were inversely related to symptom severity in general and hostility in particular. Ratings of the quality of the therapeutic relationship are not associated with patients' legal status but rather with patients' symptoms of hostility.

Concepts: Medicine, Cross-sectional study, Doctor-patient relationship, Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, Anti-psychiatry, Psychiatric hospital, Involuntary commitment

4

Psychotic and affective exacerbations associated with synthetic cannabinoid (SC) use are becoming an emerging concern in psychiatric hospitals. However, data are lacking regarding whether clinical manifestations of SC use differ from those associated with cannabis use.

Concepts: Hospital, Mental disorder, Psychiatry, Anti-psychiatry, Psychiatric hospital, Cannabinoid, Involuntary commitment, Deinstitutionalisation

3

Despite the recent increase of research interest in involuntary treatment and the use of coercive measures, gender differences among coerced schizophrenia patients still remain understudied. It is well recognized that there are gender differences both in biological correlates and clinical presentations in schizophrenia, which is one of the most common diagnoses among patients who are treated against their will. The extent to which these differences may result in a difference in the use of coercive measures for men and women during the acute phase of the disease has not been studied.

Concepts: Epidemiology, Medical terms, Gender, Gender role, Gender identity, French language, Psychiatry, Anti-psychiatry