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SE Hook and HL Osborn
Abstract
Dispersants are commonly used to mitigate the impact of oil spills, however, the ecological cost associated with their use is uncertain. The toxicity of weathered oil, dispersed weathered oil, and the hydrocarbon-based dispersant Slickgone NS(®), to the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum has been examined using standardized toxicity tests. The assumption that most toxicity occurs via narcosis was tested by measuring membrane damage in diatoms after exposure to one of the petroleum products. The mode of toxic action was determined using microarray-based gene expression profiling in diatoms after exposure to one of the petroleum products. The diatoms were found to be much more sensitive to dispersants than to the water accommodated fraction (WAF), and more sensitive to the chemically enhanced WAF (CEWAF) than to either the WAF itself or the dispersants. Exposure to dispersants and CEWAF caused membrane damage, while exposure to WAF did not. The gene expression profiles resulting from exposure to all three petroleum mixtures were highly similar, suggesting a similar mode of action for these compounds. The observed toxicity bore no relationship to PAH concentrations in the water column or to total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH), suggesting that an undescribed component of the oil was causing toxicity. Taken together, these results suggest that the use of dispersants to clean up oil spills will dramatically increase the oil toxicity to diatoms, and may have implications for ecological processes such as the timing of blooms necessary for recruitment.
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Concepts
Toxicity, Exxon Valdez oil spill, DNA microarray, Diatom, Gene expression, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Diatoms, Petroleum
MeSH headings
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