SciCombinator

Discover the most talked about and latest scientific content & concepts.

E-cigarette smoke damages DNA and reduces repair activity in mouse lung, heart, and bladder as well as in human lung and bladder cells

OPEN Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America | 31 Jan 2018

HW Lee, SH Park, MW Weng, HT Wang, WC Huang, H Lepor, XR Wu, LC Chen and MS Tang
Abstract
E-cigarette smoke delivers stimulant nicotine as aerosol without tobacco or the burning process. It contains neither carcinogenic incomplete combustion byproducts nor tobacco nitrosamines, the nicotine nitrosation products. E-cigarettes are promoted as safe and have gained significant popularity. In this study, instead of detecting nitrosamines, we directly measured DNA damage induced by nitrosamines in different organs of E-cigarette smoke-exposed mice. We found mutagenic O6-methyldeoxyguanosines and γ-hydroxy-1,N2 -propano-deoxyguanosines in the lung, bladder, and heart. DNA-repair activity and repair proteins XPC and OGG1/2 are significantly reduced in the lung. We found that nicotine and its metabolite, nicotine-derived nitrosamine ketone, can induce the same effects and enhance mutational susceptibility and tumorigenic transformation of cultured human bronchial epithelial and urothelial cells. These results indicate that nicotine nitrosation occurs in vivo in mice and that E-cigarette smoke is carcinogenic to the murine lung and bladder and harmful to the murine heart. It is therefore possible that E-cigarette smoke may contribute to lung and bladder cancer, as well as heart disease, in humans.
Tweets*
761
Facebook likes*
7
Reddit*
3
News coverage*
147
Blogs*
11
SC clicks
0
Concepts
Tobacco smoking, Electronic cigarette, Combustion, Gene, DNA, Tobacco, Nicotine, Cancer
MeSH headings
-
comments powered by Disqus

* Data courtesy of Altmetric.com