SciCombinator

Discover the most talked about and latest scientific content & concepts.

HM Tun, T Konya, TK Takaro, JR Brook, R Chari, CJ Field, DS Guttman, AB Becker, PJ Mandhane, SE Turvey, P Subbarao, MR Sears, JA Scott and AL Kozyrskyj
Abstract
Early-life exposure to household pets has the capacity to reduce risk for overweight and allergic disease, especially following caesarean delivery. Since there is some evidence that pets also alter the gut microbial composition of infants, changes to the gut microbiome are putative pathways by which pet exposure can reduce these risks to health. To investigate the impact of pre- and postnatal pet exposure on infant gut microbiota following various birth scenarios, this study employed a large subsample of 746 infants from the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development Study (CHILD) cohort, whose mothers were enrolled during pregnancy between 2009 and 2012. Participating mothers were asked to report on household pet ownership at recruitment during the second or third trimester and 3 months postpartum. Infant gut microbiota were profiled with 16S rRNA sequencing from faecal samples collected at the mean age of 3.3 months. Two categories of pet exposure (i) only during pregnancy and (ii) pre- and postnatally were compared to no pet exposure under different birth scenarios.
Tweets*
283
Facebook likes*
29
Reddit*
2
News coverage*
90
Blogs*
8
SC clicks
0
Concepts
Infant, Feces, Allergy, Ribosomal RNA, 16S ribosomal RNA, Pregnancy, Gut flora, Childbirth
MeSH headings
-
comments powered by Disqus

* Data courtesy of Altmetric.com