SciCombinator

Discover the most talked about and latest scientific content & concepts.

Dinosaur incubation periods directly determined from growth-line counts in embryonic teeth show reptilian-grade development

OPEN Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America | 5 Jan 2017

GM Erickson, DK Zelenitsky, DI Kay and MA Norell
Abstract
Birds stand out from other egg-laying amniotes by producing relatively small numbers of large eggs with very short incubation periods (average 11-85 d). This aspect promotes high survivorship by limiting exposure to predation and environmental perturbation, allows for larger more fit young, and facilitates rapid attainment of adult size. Birds are living dinosaurs; their rapid development has been considered to reflect the primitive dinosaurian condition. Here, nonavian dinosaurian incubation periods in both small and large ornithischian taxa are empirically determined through growth-line counts in embryonic teeth. Our results show unexpectedly slow incubation (2.8 and 5.8 mo) like those of outgroup reptiles. Developmental and physiological constraints would have rendered tooth formation and incubation inherently slow in other dinosaur lineages and basal birds. The capacity to determine incubation periods in extinct egg-laying amniotes has implications for dinosaurian embryology, life history strategies, and survivorship across the Cretaceous-Paleogene mass extinction event.
Tweets*
51
Facebook likes*
10
Reddit*
1
News coverage*
73
Blogs*
6
SC clicks
0
Concepts
Reptile, Cretaceous–Tertiary extinction event, Extinction event, Extinction, Dinosaur
MeSH headings
-
comments powered by Disqus

* Data courtesy of Altmetric.com